Kuno Becker

Kuno Becker

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Katie Couric's FED UP Premiere

Kuno Becker - Everything we've been told about food and exercise for the past 30 years is dead wrong. FED UP is the film the food industry doesn't want you to see. From Katie Couric, Laurie David (AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH) and director Stephanie Soechtig, FED UP will change the way you eat forever. The film opens in theaters across the country on Friday May 9th. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 8th May 2014

Kuno Becker
Kuno Becker
Kuno Becker

LA premiere of 'The Quiet Ones' - Arrivals

Kuno Becker - Los Angeles premiere of 'The Quiet Ones' - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 22nd April 2014

'Instructions Not Included' premiere

Kuno Becker - Premiere of Pantelion Films' 'Instructions Not Included' - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 22nd August 2013

Kuno Becker

Picture - Kuno Becker Hollywood, California, Thursday 10th September 2009

Kuno Becker Thursday 10th September 2009 Padres Contra El Cancer's 9th Annual 'Sue–o De Esperanza' Benefit Gala held at The Hollywood Palladium Hollywood, California

Kuno Becker

Goal II: Living the Dream Review


Grim
As its name implies, Goal II is a sequel, but what you may not know is that it is actually the second part of what will likely be the only European soccer trilogy ever filmed. In this episode, young Mexican-American soccer genius Santiago Munes (Kuno Becker), having made it from LA to one of Britain's top "football" clubs in Goal I, now gets to "live the dream" as a world-famous soccer star.

No sooner is he Britain's brand new sensation than Santi is traded away to the Valhalla of European soccer, Real Madrid. He's happy to go, even if it means putting stress on his relationship with his British fiancée Roz (Anna Friel). Whisked off to Spain, he finds himself sharing a locker room with Beckham, Ronaldinho, Zidane (all appearing as themselves), and Gavin Harris (Alessandro Nivola), an old-time and rapidly aging British soccer star who shows Santi what this world of Ferraris, mansions, and bosomy Spanish sluts is all about. The painfully sincere Santi is wide-eyed but virtuous and only gets into trouble when photographers catch him in what they mistakenly believe to be naughty acts. After seeing the photos herself, poor Roz is bereft in rainy Newcastle.

Continue reading: Goal II: Living the Dream Review

Sex and Breakfast Review


Grim
Yes, I know he's 28 years old now, but I'm just still not ready to accept Macaulay Culkin as a sexual being, much less deal with him as the star of a sex drama like Sex and Breakfast.

The task would be easier if the film had more going for it. Miles Brandman writes and directs this story of two young couples who find their relationships flagging, and who both decide that the way to patch things up is to sleep with other people. Why, of course!

Continue reading: Sex and Breakfast Review

Nomad Review


Weak
I get the sense that the story of the making of Nomad is far more interesting than the film itself. Shot in Kazakhstan over the course of two years (weather and funding caused delays) with the urging of the Kazakh president, acquired and doctored by Harvey Weinstein, and starring a cast of Americans speaking Kazakh and Kazakhs speaking English with assorted in-line dubbing all over the place (Bai Ling!), this horse-and-yurt epic is picturesque but baffling. What was behind it all? An attempt to recover the dignity of the Kazakh people after the PR debable of Borat?

As for the end product: Nomad will appeal mainly to two small special-interest groups: those with a fascination for 18th century Central Asian geopolitics, and those with a fascination for costume design. Also, people who like swords and horses.

Continue reading: Nomad Review

Goal! The Dream Begins Review


Grim

Burdened with the most optimistic title since Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins, Goal! The Dream Begins is indeed the first part of a trilogy that will eventually take a soccer-mad kid from Los Angeles to the World Cup. But first, he's gotta get out of the barrio; good thing there's a cliché-ridden story arc to get him there.

This chapter brings young Santiago Munez (Mexican telenovela hunk Kuno Becker) to grubby Tyneside, U.K., a destination most sun-addicted Angelinos would only consider a Dream if they were going to play Premiership soccer. Fortunately, after a scout from Newcastle United observes his ball skills, this is exactly Santiago's fate. Soon he's saying adios to his undocumented immigrant family, including Dad, who'd rather his son pursue the American dream of mowing other people's grass. Somehow Santiago gets a passport, and off he goes.

Continue reading: Goal! The Dream Begins Review

Lucia, Lucia Review


Good
How does an attention-grabber like Lucia, Lucia get a finale so dull, that it actually taints the entire movie? For about 90 minutes, the movie grabs you by the shirt collar with a plot ripe with humor, sex, and character development. And then those last minutes come along like a kazoo solo in a Springsteen working-class anthem, forever altering your experience.

Regardless of that metaphorical solo, Lucia, Lucia blends a lot of different styles effortlessly and is buoyed by a terrific performance by Cecilia Roth in the title role. Lucia is an aging children's book writer who is unsatisfied with her life in Mexico. Everything changes, when her bureaucrat husband, Ramon, disappears at the airport.

Continue reading: Lucia, Lucia Review

Kuno Becker

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