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Daughter of Klaus Kinski Claims German Actor Raped Her


Klaus Kinski Werner Herzog

The daughter of Klaus Kinski - the late German actor known for Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo - has accused her father of raping her repeatedly as a child. The worrying accusations were made this week by Pola Kinski, his now 60-year-old daughter from his first marriage. 

Speaking in Germany's weekly magazine Stern, Pola said, "He ignored everything, including the fact that I often tried to resist and told him 'I don't want to'. He simply didn't care. He just took what he wanted." Kinski - known for his short temper - died in California in 1991 and was regarded as one of Germany's most exuberant performers. He appeared alongside Clint Eastwood in the western For A Few Dollars More, though was known for his work with Herzog, which often resulted in violent clashes with the director. Kinski had a history of mental health problems and attempted suicide. His vitriolic outbursts meant he was feared by interviewers. His daughter claims that the actor began summoning her to hotel rooms and apartments in Berlin, Rome and Madrid, throwing her against walls and subjecting her to violent rape before showering her with lavish gifts afterwards. "He treated himself to a little sex object, placed on silk cushions," she said.

Klaus Kinski had two other children with his second and third wives. His daughter - the film star Natasha Kinski and son Nikolai - are yet to comment on Pola's revelations.

Picture - Atmosphere with a picture of... Berlin, Germany, Friday 26th November 2010

Atmosphere, Berlin and Klaus Kinski - Atmosphere with a picture of Klaus Kinski Berlin, Germany - Reopening of the Seven Star Gallery at nhow Hotel Friday 26th November 2010

Crawlspace Review


Grim
Old-fashioned horror -- plotless, goofily gory, and a few boobies for the perusing. Klaus Kinski stars as a nice old man who rents rooms in his house to young ladies -- only he's a masochistic ex-Nazi with a penchant for crawling around in the heating ducts to ogle them, at least while he's not designing bizarre instruments of torture or caring for the poor sap he keeps in a cage. Sad performances and a meandering plot -- if that -- make this a pass, but it's good for a couple of cheap thrills and a fond reminder of why horror flicks have gotten so bad. Originally in 3-D.

Crawlspace Review


Grim
Old-fashioned horror -- plotless, goofily gory, and a few boobies for the perusing. Klaus Kinski stars as a nice old man who rents rooms in his house to young ladies -- only he's a masochistic ex-Nazi with a penchant for crawling around in the heating ducts to ogle them, at least while he's not designing bizarre instruments of torture or caring for the poor sap he keeps in a cage. Sad performances and a meandering plot -- if that -- make this a pass, but it's good for a couple of cheap thrills and a fond reminder of why horror flicks have gotten so bad.

Marquis de Sade: Justine Review


Terrible
Of all the films I've seen based on the Marquis de Sade's literature and life, Justine comes the closest to being an Emmanuelle sequel. It's also the only one that I know of to star Jack Palance and gives us none other than the glorious freak Klaus Kinski as the Marquis himself. The story involves a young virgin's sexual awakening -- and willing subjection to humiliation and light torture -- and is in keeping with de Sade's work. Still, though it's rather awfully made, it's somewhat tame by today's standards, which also makes it more than a bit humorous.

Continue reading: Marquis de Sade: Justine Review

Fitzcarraldo Review


Weak
Werner Herzog takes another river trip (after Aguirre, the Wrath of God), this time with the impossibly scary-looking Klaus Kinski as an only semi-insane man who wants to bring together Enrico Caruso and Sarah Bernhardt for an opera. (And you only thought it was about an Italian dance.) In so doing, he navigates a Peruvian river in order to harvest its rubber trees, goading a group of Indians into lifting his steamboat over the mountains. If there's a point to this, it's what Herzog's point always is: That obsession can drive you nuts. I'm not sure I needed a freaky German traipsing through the jungle for 2 1/2 hours to drive that point home, but there you have it. The contraption built to hault the boat over the mountains, however, is quite an astonishing thing to behold.

Burden Of Dreams Review


Good
Burden of Dreams is an odd choice for the Criterion Collection: It's a documentary about the making of a film (Fitzcarraldo) which itself has not even been released on the Criterion label. It's also the only making-of doc that Criterion has ever released (at least to my knowledge).

That said, Fitzcarraldo is strikingly unique in the history of film, and the story behind it is one worth hearing a little more about. It all started haltingly -- with Jason Robards and Mick Jagger, believe it or not, starring in the movie about a crazed rubber baron who wants to build an opera house deep in the Amazon rain forest. But after Robards gets sick and Jagger drops out, the film starts over, with Klaus Kinski in the famous lead role as Fitzcarraldo. Fitzcarraldo isn't just regular-crazy, he's totally nuts: Part of his plan involves dragging an enormous barge over a mile of land in order to reach an otherwise shut-off river, and director Werner Herzog staged this -- for real -- during the making of Fitzcarraldo.

Continue reading: Burden Of Dreams Review

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