Kimberly Peirce

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"Carrie" Los Angeles Premiere

Kimberly Peirce and Evren Savci - "Carrie" Los Angeles Premiere Held at The ArcLight Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 8th October 2013

Julianne Moore, Kimberly Peirce and Chloe Grace Moretz
Julianne Moore, Kimberly Peirce and Chloe Grace Moretz
Julianne Moore, Kimberly Peirce and Chloe Grace Moretz
Alex Russell, Cynthia Preston, Judy Greer, Julianne Moore, Kimberly Peirce, Chloe Grace Moretz and Portia Doubleday
Kimberly Peirce

Premiere of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures and Screen Gems CARRIE

Julianne Moore, Kimberly Peirce and Chloë Grace Moretz - Celebrities attend Premiere of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures' and Screen Gems' CARRIE at ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 7th October 2013

Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore Hollywood Walk of Fame Star Ceremony

Chloe Grace Moretz, Julianne Moore and Kimberly Peirce - Julianne Moore Hollywood Walk of Fame Star Ceremony - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 3rd October 2013

chloe Moretz
Chloe Grace Moretz
Chloe Grace Moretz
Chloe Grace Moretz
Chloe Grace Moretz

The East Premiere

Kimberly Peirce - Los Angeles Premiere of "The East" held at the ArcLight Hollywood Theatre 10 - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 29th May 2013

Kimberly Peirce
Kimberly Peirce
Kimberly Peirce

Carrie Trailer


Carrie White is a plain and very sheltered girl raised alone by her extremely strict Christian mother who frequently punishes her. At school she is habitually bullied, something that gets ten times worse after a both humiliating and terrifying experience in the girls' locker room which causes her mother to inflict yet more punishment on her. Through her tumultuous life, she discovers that she has the power to move objects with her mind, something that causes much distress to her mother. The only people to truly show any compassion is her gym teacher Miss Desjardin and one of the popular girls, Sue Snell, who encourages her handsome boyfriend Tommy Ross to take her to the school prom. Carrie accepts, believing that she has been accepted for the first time in her life, only to face the biggest and most destructive humiliation of her life. 

The re-make to the Oscar nominated 1976 horror based on the book by acclaimed author Stephen King is due to hit screens this year in the first major rendition since the Brian De Palma flick's release. 2013's 'Carrie' has been directed by Kimberly Peirce ('Boys Don't Cry', 'Stop-Loss') with a screenplay by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa ('Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa') and it is set for release in UK cinemas everywhere from November 29th 2013.

Click Here To Read - Carrie Movie Review

Carrie Remake Teaser Trailer: Will Fans Of The Original Be Converted?


Chloe Moretz Julianne Moore Brian De Palma Kimberly Peirce Sissy Spacek

A teaser trailer for the Carrie remake was unveiled at New York’s Comic Con last weekend and has now made its way online. Starring Chloe Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore, the re-visioning of the 1976 Brian De Palma classic will, of course, have horror fanatics cowering behind the sofa in fear, peering gingerly through the fingers that fearfully cover their eyes. This won’t be because they are particularly scared of whatever is happening on screen, though but because they are petrified of what director Kimberly Peirce may have done to their beloved Carrie.

The teaser trailer itself isn’t exactly very… teasing. As the camera pans over an American town that’s been pretty much entirely set on fire, it eventually zooms in on Chloe Grace Moretz, stood in the middle of the street, surrounded by flames and covered in blood, recalling the classic Carrie scene. Except, in the classic image of Carrie (played by Sissy Spacek), covered in blood, she wasn’t standing in the middle of the street. She was at her school prom. But hey, why let a massive detail like that upset you? Perhaps this scene is just from her walk home from the prom. (Cue thousands of horror purists reaching for their ventilators).

Over the action, a montage of voices spout various suspense-inducing phrases, such as “she wasn’t some monster — she was just a girl” and “her mother was a fanatic, I don’t know how she lived with her.” We don’t get much more than that from this first glimpse of the film; the movie’s producers will have to try a lot harder than this if they want to coax any fans of the original out from behind the sofa.


Stop-Loss Review


OK
Any suspicions that Kimberly Peirce was a one-note art house auteur (her first and only feature was 1999's Boys Don't Cry) will be immediately assuaged by the full-throttle war-film assuredness of the opening sequences of her Iraq war film Stop-Loss. Shot in part like the homemade videos that modern American soldiers often make of their own experiences (filmed on the battlefield and then edited, usually with pop music soundtracks, on their personal computers), it establishes with smash-bang audacity and authenticity the camaraderie and of an infantry squad serving in Tikrit near the end of their rotation. The combat witnessed is typically brutal, up-close, and all-inclusive (military and civilian) in terms of casualties. Without having to put much of anything into words, Peirce has put her fresh-faced young cast (Ryan Phillippe, Channing Tatum, Joseph Gordon-Levitt) through a meat-grinder of an ordeal that makes it perfectly clear that once these guys are back stateside, patriotic or not, they're done.

Like In the Valley of Elah -- which this film occasionally seems like an MTV/Varsity Blues pop variation of -- most of Stop-Loss is set back in the States. The war is seen mostly in flickers and video-montages, the kind that keep a man up at night. In one particularly grueling scene set at a military hospital, a hideously scarred soldier missing two limbs confides that at night his ward sounds like a horror movie, with all the nightmares and screaming. Also like Elah, Peirce's script (co-written with Mark Richard) is steeped in oorah military brio and discipline, where there is little questioning of war itself. Stop-Loss is, however, a message movie, and no matter how artfully Peirce directs her cast and tries to avoid any sense of political polemic, there's just no avoiding that message, a fact that nearly scuppers the whole film.

Continue reading: Stop-Loss Review

Picture - Kimberly Peirce and Guest Los Angeles, California, Monday 17th March 2008

Kimberly Peirce and Directors Guild Of America - Kimberly Peirce and Guest Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles premiere of 'Stop-Loss' - arrivals held at Directors Guild of America Monday 17th March 2008

This Film Is Not Yet Rated Review


Weak
When South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker made Orgazmo, a romp about a Mormon porn star, and submitted it to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) for a rating, it came back NC-17. The filmmakers asked what they could do to get it down to an R, and they were told, brusquely, nothing. Years later they made Team America: World Police, which included a four-minute puppet-sex scene (including many shots they had no intention of using, just so they'd have something to cut out) that pushed them into forbidden territory. This time, however, they were provided scene-specific notes on how to make the film into an R. The difference? Orgazmo was an indie release, while Team America came from Paramount Studios. The message of this story, as relayed by Stone in the documentary This Film is Not Yet Rated, is fairly simple: The MPAA is less a responsible watchdog organization keeping the country safe from sexually explicit material than it is a corrupt industry tool, keeping the fig leaf of respectability not so firmly in place.

The MPAA was a lobbying organization that first implemented its voluntary ratings system in 1968 under the auspices of Jack Valenti, a Washington insider and LBJ confidant determined to defend Hollywood from the possibility of government regulation. Valenti argued it was better for film studios to police themselves so as to avoid having political prudes come down with a modernized Hays Code. So filmmakers must present their films to the MPAA's classifications panel (whose identities are never disclosed and are only described on the MPAA's website as "a board of parents") and then, if they don't have enough industry clout or the ability/desire to cut and resubmit their film for another pass, have to live with whatever rating is passed down. As This Film points out time and again, given that NC-17 films are shown by almost no theaters and often not carried by video rental chains, it's a system where de facto censorship is carried out by a secret nongovernmental body that seems to have a real problem with sex.

Continue reading: This Film Is Not Yet Rated Review

This Film Is Not Yet Rated Review


Weak
When South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker made Orgazmo, a romp about a Mormon porn star, and submitted it to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) for a rating, it came back NC-17. The filmmakers asked what they could do to get it down to an R, and they were told, brusquely, nothing. Years later they made Team America: World Police, which included a four-minute puppet-sex scene (including many shots they had no intention of using, just so they'd have something to cut out) that pushed them into forbidden territory. This time, however, they were provided scene-specific notes on how to make the film into an R. The difference? Orgazmo was an indie release, while Team America came from Paramount Studios. The message of this story, as relayed by Stone in the documentary This Film is Not Yet Rated, is fairly simple: The MPAA is less a responsible watchdog organization keeping the country safe from sexually explicit material than it is a corrupt industry tool, keeping the fig leaf of respectability not so firmly in place.

The MPAA was a lobbying organization that first implemented its voluntary ratings system in 1968 under the auspices of Jack Valenti, a Washington insider and LBJ confidant determined to defend Hollywood from the possibility of government regulation. Valenti argued it was better for film studios to police themselves so as to avoid having political prudes come down with a modernized Hays Code. So filmmakers must present their films to the MPAA's classifications panel (whose identities are never disclosed and are only described on the MPAA's website as "a board of parents") and then, if they don't have enough industry clout or the ability/desire to cut and resubmit their film for another pass, have to live with whatever rating is passed down. As This Film points out time and again, given that NC-17 films are shown by almost no theaters and often not carried by video rental chains, it's a system where de facto censorship is carried out by a secret nongovernmental body that seems to have a real problem with sex.

Continue reading: This Film Is Not Yet Rated Review

Boys Don't Cry Review


Essential
Boys Don't Cry, the first film that I have paid for without the promise of immediate compensation in quite a while, cost me $9.50 for a matinee.

It was worth every penny.

Continue reading: Boys Don't Cry Review

Kimberly Peirce

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