Kim Gordon

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The Punk Singer Trailer


Kathleen Hanna was one of the pioneering icons of the riot grrrl feminist punk movement in the 90s as the lead singer of Bikini Kill and later Le Tigre. Outspoken and determined, she wanted to bring feminism to pop culture in a way that had never before been done, at a time where male orientated grunge artists such as Nirvana were at the top of their game. The years after her initial music career were a deep struggle for Kathleen, however, due to serious health issues. She had contracted Lyme disease which forced her to leave Le Tigre in 2005 and undergo treatment. It caused much confusion among her fans who thought she'd never stop making powerful pro-woman music, but now she's back in business with her newest band The Julie Ruin.

This candid documentary tells the story of Kathleen's chaotic career and troublesome personal life featuring intimate interviews with the likes of Kathleen herself, her husband and Beastie Boys member Adam Horovitz, Sleater-Kinney singer Carrie Brownstein, Joan Jett from Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, fashion blogger Tavi Gevinson and Sonic Youth vocalist Kim Gordon. 'The Punk Singer' won the Women in Cinema Lena Sharpe Award at the Seattle International Film Festival where it also landed 2nd place for the Golden Space Needle Award and was nominated for the Documentary Award. It is due for release on May 23rd 2014.

Click here to read The Punk Singer movie review

MOCA Celebrates 35th Anniversary Gala

Kim Gordon - Celebrities attend MOCA's 35th Anniversary Gala presented by Louis Vuitton welcoming new Director Philippe Vergne at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 29th March 2014

Kim Gordon
Guest and Kim Gordon

"Girls" Season Three Premiere

Kim Gordon - "Girls" Season Three Premiere at Jazz at Lincoln Center - New York, New York, United States - Monday 6th January 2014

Kim Gordon

"A Glimpse Inside The Mind Of Charles Swan III" New York Screening

Kim Gordon and Fred Armisen - Kim Gordon, Fred Armisen New York City, NY, United States "A Glimpse Inside The Mind Of Charles Swan III" New York Screening Wednesday 9th January 2013

Kim Gordon and Fred Armisen

Surface to Air store opening party - Inside

Vel and Kim Gordon Wednesday 7th September 2011 Surface to Air store opening party - Inside New York City, USA

Surface to Air store opening party - Inside

Kim Gordon - Jeremie Roza and Kim Gordon New York City, USA - Surface to Air store opening party - Inside Wednesday 7th September 2011

Boarding Gate Review


Grim
Asia Argento plays a former prostitute cum corporate assassin who decides to murder her old flame in Olivier Assayas' wasteful Boarding Gate, and that's just about all I can say about the movie. Michael Madsen plays a perverse bigwig too, but he's done that before; Assayas shows an interest in Chinese technology, but he's also done that before, and with more impressive results. Despite its intentions, the only thing even worth speaking about here is Ms. Argento, fruit of Italian horror maestro Dario Argento's loins.

Sandra (Argento) spends the first push of this dismal film talking background with Miles (Madsen). and even in these stagy environs, Argento's unkempt sleaze permeates the entire scene. Miles speaks about his new wife and kids but can't help but fall for Sandra, with her hand placed playfully between her thighs, asking him to say the word "slave" over and over. Later, she talks about how an encounter with her ex-flame put her off of Lebanese cuisine, not long before she strips down to black panties and strangles Miles with his belt while giving him a handjob. Then she shoots him full of bullets.

Continue reading: Boarding Gate Review

Last Days (2005) Review


Extraordinary
Completing a stylistic and thematic trilogy begun with 2003's Gerry and Elephant (and inspired by the work of Hungarian auteur Bela Tarr), Last Days finds director Gus Van Sant once again engaging in breathtaking experimentation with sound, image, and content. Just as Elephant was modeled after, but not a faithful depiction of, the Columbine high school shootings, so Van Sant's latest - charting the final hours of a reclusive, iconic rock star in his remote country mansion - is simultaneously about and not about Kurt Cobain, a hypothetical rumination on the deceased musician that shares with his preceding films a hypnotic sense of time and space, as well as a fascination with the prosaic moments proceeding death. Having turned his back on the staid narrative conventions of formulaic Hollywood dramas (including his own Finding Forrester and Good Will Hunting), Van Sant now embraces an avant-garde aesthetic concerned with finding truth through non-linear storytelling and a focus on environmental tone and texture, both of which are employed as a means of placing viewers in a particular physical and emotional "space." And with Last Days, this unorthodox filmmaking achieves a state of sublime cinematic nirvana.

"Teenage angst has paid off well / Now I'm bored and old," sang Cobain on Nirvana's Serve the Servants, and one can feel that infectious malaise throughout Van Sant's portrait of Blake (Michael Pitt), a grungy icon living out what a friend (Kim Gordon) dubs "a rock and roll cliché." Donning Cobain accoutrements such as a hunter's cap and a green-and-red sweater and sporting shoulder-length blond hair, Blake spends the film sleepwalking around his backwoods home and property with a mixture of drug-addled bewilderment and spiritual melancholy, and Pitt embodies this wayward soul - whose rambling exploits involve wearing a black spaghetti-strap dress and toting a rifle - with a hunched, drooping-to-the-floor sagginess (as if under tremendous strain) that's at odds with the actor's slender physique. His constantly incomprehensible muttering, such as during an amusing, chance encounter with a telephone book salesman (where the only audible Blake line is telling: "Success is subjective"), echoes Cobain's frequently indecipherable lyrics while also conveying a torturous emotional detachment. Trapped in Van Sant's constrictive full frame (employed to heighten the oppressive claustrophobia gripping the character), Pitt's Blake is a zombie who, as revealed by the film's opening scene - finding him symbolically baptizing himself in a tree-shrouded lake, and later whispering and then roaring "Home on the Range" to the empty nighttime forest - desperately seeks communion with the world around him.

Continue reading: Last Days (2005) Review

Kim Gordon

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