Kelly Lynch

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Los Angeles LGBT Center Hosts Annual Garden Party - An Afternoon In Tuscany

Annie Goto, Kelly Lynch and Guests - Los Angeles LGBT Center Hosts Annual Garden Party - An Afternoon In Tuscany at Private Residence - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 26th July 2015

Annie Goto, Kelly Lynch and Guests
Kelly Lynch and Madonna Cacciatore
Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch
Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch

An Evening With Women

Brent Bolthouse, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch - A variety of female celebrities were snapped as they attended an Evening With Women Benefitting the Los Angeles LGBT Center which was held at the Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 16th May 2015

Brent Bolthouse, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch
Brent Bolthouse, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch
Brent Bolthouse, Lorri L. Jean, Pauley Perrette, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch
Brent Bolthouse, Lorri L. Jean, Pauley Perrette, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch
Lorri L. Jean, Pauley Perrette, Annie Goto and Kelly Lynch

Tribeca Film Festival L.A. Celebration

Kelly Lynch - Tribeca Film Festival L.A. Celebration held at The Standard in Hollywood. at Tribeca Film Festival - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 24th March 2015

The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Kelly Lynch - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 23rd February 2015

Kelly Lynch
Kelly Lynch

The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Kelly Lynch - The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall - Arrivals at Wallis Annenberg Center, Oscars - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Kelly Lynch
Kelly Lynch
Kelly Lynch

Kaboom Review


Excellent
As this scruffy coming-of-age sex comedy turns into a horror movie, the combination is completely disarming. It's both silly and creepy, with honest subtext about youthful searching and the complexities of human sexuality.

Just starting university, 18-year-old Smith (Dekker) hasn't decided yet whether he's gay or straight. It doesn't help that his often naked roommate Thor (Zylka) claims to be straight despite evidence to the contrary. His best pal is the sardonic Stella (Bennett), who has a crush on a hot girl (Mesquida). Yes, everyone's obsessed with sex, and they're experimenting rather a lot. But Smith is also haunted by nightmarish dreams about a redhead (LaLiberte). And when these dreams start invading real life, he's not sure what to do about it.

Continue reading: Kaboom Review

Persons Unknown Review


Grim
While I futilely try to figure out the ending of Persons Unknown means, I'm left to wonder why this film saw no real theatrical release, and why it took 11 years to make it to DVD. Maybe the fact that it's fairly ludicrous or nonsensical? The circuitous plot gives us a kind of cool beginning, with a security pro (Joe Mantegna) being hustled by a girl (Kelly Lynch) who's heading up a big heist. Eventually he tracks her down, figures out what's going on, runs off with their loot, and watches bodies pile up in the mountains. The last half of the film is alternately filled with typical shoot 'em up/run 'em down scenes and kind of silly plot twists. The top shelf cast is uniformly wasted, including Naomi Watts in an early role.

Road House Review


Terrible
Mike Nelson, in his fantastic book of reviews of awful movies (Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese), calls Road House "the single finest American film. Certainly it stinks, but I believe the filmmakers meant it to, and succeeded grandly." Road House also made its way into Bad Movies We Love, Edward Marguiles and Stephen Rebello's fine rundown of the worst movies ever made.

As a movie lover, I feel it's important to see the clunkers so I can appreciate the classic stuff. Part of me felt incomplete for not seeing Rowdy Herrington's 1989 anti-classic. When the time came to review it -- so that watching the movie felt somewhat legitimate -- I jumped at the chance. The verdict: In terms of sheer awfulness, I think 13th Child, SuperBabies: Baby Geniuses 2, and House of the Dead beat it. Oh, sure, Road House is bad. It's just not awestruck bad.

Continue reading: Road House Review

Dallas 362 Review


OK
Scott Caan wrote and directed this film about, um, himself and his erstwhile brother Rusty (Shawn Hatosy), two lovable toughs/borderline losers determined to make something good of their lives. That is, if they can stop fighting in bars and working for the local bookie as enforcer muscle. The meandering film is well meaning but derivative of many twentysomething-ennui indies, though it's bolstered by a fun performance by Jeff Goldblum as a stoner shrink and Kelly Lynch as the boys' mom, caught topless (and in bed with Goldblum) in just about every other scene she's in.

Heaven's Prisoners Review


Grim
A promising movie about a troubled couple who witness a bad, digital-effect plane crash and adopt the sole survivor, a young Salvadoran girl, gets stupid after 35 minutes when it degenerates into a witch hunt after the wife gets killed. You know, for seeing something she wasn't supposed to. Whatever. Two long and convoluted hours make Heaven's Prisoners an exercise in tedium.

The Slaughter Rule Review


Grim
Believer star Ryan Gosling plays Roy Chutney, a Montana kid recruited into gruff and troubled coach Gideon's (David Morse) six-man football team. Not much happens along the way aside from a creepy romance with shrewish Clea DuVall and lots and lots of practice. Everyone's got demons to deal with -- from Gideon's guilt over a kid that played for him and died under mysterious circumstances to the audience's unwillingness to sit through two hours of yet another inspirational football movie.

Virtuosity Review


Weak
In the not so distant future (er, past... 1999 A.D.), Virtual Reality has progressed to the point where the Virtual part isn't so clear. With the help of nanotechnology (read: really small) machines, VR simulations can take on a physical form composed of millions of these teeny robots. When a semi-crazed engineer decides to bring his ultimate bad guy VR program to life, he sneaks the chip into some of this robotic glop. Thus, Sid 6.7 is born.

Sid (Russell Crowe) is version number 6.7 of a compilation of 183 personalities: mass murderers, serial killers, and Hitler-types. The ultimate villain, Sid is imbued with the ability to regenerate damage at the touch of glass (silicon), almost superhuman powers, and the cunning and mental imbalance of history's worst killers. And who would have thought...when you let Sid out of the lab, Sid wants to kill. Preferably on national television.

Continue reading: Virtuosity Review

Joe Somebody Review


Grim
The premise for Joe Somebody could fit on the back of a Cuban postcard. But here's the long version: Allen plays Joe Scheffer -- a poster boy for cubical bleakness -- who works as a video editor at a generic pharmaceutical company in Minnesota, who spends his days cutting together ridiculous ads for nameless health products. Joe's divorced, has an annoyingly clever pre-teen daughter, and dresses like a substitute teacher. One day, while parking his tan sedan in the "10-year associates" parking lot during family day at the office -- don't ask -- a confrontation occurs between Joe and salesman named Mark McKinney. No kids, not the guy from Kids in the Hall who crushes heads with his thumb and index finger, McKinney is played by Patrick Warburton, who stars in yet another bad movie role. After getting bitch-slapped in the most unbelievable scene in recent cinema memory, Joe retreats into a state of drunkenness, ashamed of failing in the eyes of his daughter and getting further pummeled by McKinney.

After emotional prodding by the company's "wellness director" Meg Harper (hotcake Julie Bowen), Joe is awakened from his corporate stupor and challenges McKinney to a rematch to regain his honor. In the process, Joe gains the admiration of the entire company, as everyone in the place appears somehow pissed off at him. On the road to recovery, Joe lands the promotion he always wanted, kicks ass at squash, leads fellow co-workers in karaoke, and eventually evolves into the kind of generic corporate schmuck that we all hate far worse than any big league bully.

Continue reading: Joe Somebody Review

Cocktail Review


Weak
Before there was Coyote Ugly, there was Cocktail.

The story of an ex-G.I. (Cruise) who can't get a job in the Manhattan business world and turns to bartending to make his fortune is as a bartender, pouring with style, jumping on the counter, and spouting poetry. The love story with rich girl Elisabeth Shue is hilarious -- but watch for Kelly Lynch and Gina Gershon, both unknown at the time, in small tryst roles.

Continue reading: Cocktail Review

Searching for Debra Winger Review


OK
It's either sad or interesting or -- something -- when the only man in a movie is Roger Ebert. Rosanna Arquette, tired of hearing that old aphorism that there are no good parts for women in Hollywood, takes up a video camera and records interviews with some three dozen actresses at various ages. (The title invokes Debra Winger's recent retirement and reclusiveness -- though since this film she returned to the cinema.)

Continue reading: Searching for Debra Winger Review

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