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John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

Very Good

Keanu Reeves picks up his supremely efficient hitman immediately where the 2015 original left him: regrouping with his new, as-yet-unnamed dog after taking down the New York mob that he used to work for. Director Chad Stahelski and writer Derek Kolstad have created another unusually satisfying action thriller, with sharply developed characters and a plot that holds more water than most of these kinds of movies. Obviously, it can't be as fresh as the first film, but it's thoroughly entertaining.

Reeves' John still just wants to be left alone, but after taking care of one loose end, he is contacted by Italian mafioso Santino (Riccardo Scamarcio), who calls in a blood oath. Unable to refuse, John heads to Rome to carry out a hit he knows will make his life exponentially more precarious, especially as it puts him into conflict with his old friend Cassian (Common). Sure enough, he now has an army of goons chasing him, led by mute thug Ares (Ruby Rose). So he returns to New York and gets in contact with an underground guru (Laurence Fishburne) who might be able to offer some respite from the hordes trying to kill him. And manager Winston (Ian McShane) is also willing to help John, as long as he abides by the rules of the criminal underworld.

The film is another superb mix of cool imagery and coherent action that moves briskly from one brutal encounter to the next. Vicious gunfights and car chases abound in this movie, and all are staged with bracing energy and a heightened sense of realism. Through all of this, Reeves maintains a sense of weary dignity in finely tailored suits that are refreshed after each messy encounter. How he keeps walking and fighting after each bruising fight is another question.

Continue reading: John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

Keanu Reeves Perfected 'Movie Kung Fu' For John Wick Chapter 2


Keanu Reeves

The original John Wick movie caught the attention both of audience and critics, so a sequel was soon on the cards, and Reeves was happy to dive back in for Chapter 2.

"When we last left John Wick," he says, "he was going off into the sunset - the moonset - with his dog. John Wick Chapter 2 takes place maybe five days after that. Now John is on a mission to reclaim his life. To me, it's about John Wick fighting for John."

Keanu Reeves John Wick Chapter 2

Continue reading: Keanu Reeves Perfected 'Movie Kung Fu' For John Wick Chapter 2

Keanu Reeves 'Loves Playing John Wick'


Keanu Reeves

Keanu Reeves is back as ex-hitman John Wick in the sequel to the 2014 box office smash and he couldn’t be happier.

John Wick: Chapter 2 sees Reeves’ character back out of retirement and on the run, after a bounty is placed on his head. For Reeves, getting to play Wick one more time was a ‘pleasure’ and left him feeling lucky to go to work every day.

Keanu ReevesKeanu Reeves is back as John Wick in John Wick: Chapter 2

Continue reading: Keanu Reeves 'Loves Playing John Wick'

John Wick: Chapter 2 - Featurette Trailer


John Wick returns for round two some time after being forced back into the criminal life he was so determined to abandon. He's still one of the greatest assassins of all his outlaw peers, and this time - with a bounty on his life - he's taking down every single armed crook that gets in his way and threatens to destroy him.

Keanu Reeves, along with director Chad Stahelski and stunt double Jackson Spidell, recently opened up about the intricacies of the action in the second installment in a short featurette, explaining how the actor got back into the fighting, the weapons training and the crazy driving. It's a mixture of different arts, and something that producers have dubbed 'gun-fu'.

'John Wick Chapter 2' arrives in theatres on February 10th 2017. 

John Wick: Chapter 2 Trailer


Former hitman John Wick is in Rome following events in the first movie where he sought bloody revenge on the man who killed his dog and stole his car. He's still bereaved from the death of his wife Helen (who died before events in the first film) but he has at least got himself a new puppy. While it can be argued that his revenge massacre doesn't necessarily mean he's back in the game even if it did find him in the company of his former associates, this time his vow of retirement is broken for sure. An old friend is trying to takeover over a nefarious group of international assassins, and he is forced to join him because of the blood oath he made many years ago. This is not the kind of job you can quit easily.

Continue: John Wick: Chapter 2 Trailer

The Whole Truth Trailer


Mike Lassiter finds himself being put on trial for the murder of his father. The Lassiter's are a rich family and Mike lives with his mother Loretta and father Boone. The body of Boone is found with a knife still in the fatal stab wound that killed him, Mike's fingerprints are on the weapon and when he is interviewed by the police he admits to stabbing his father.

With an incredible amount of evidence, the police arrest and charge the teenager with the murder of his father. Mike's mum, Loretta, recruits her attorney friend Richard Ramsay to defend her son and as Richard begins to develop his case more and more facts come to light about that night and Boone Lassiter.

It's uncovered that Boone is a vicious man who could be 'exceptionally cruel' and Mike witnessed events of abuse carried out on Loretta by his father - he'd even threaten his son. As the case proceeds, Richard asks another attorney to come on board and help keep Mike out of prison. Janelle is a young yet enthusiastic lawyer who believes that Mike is protecting his mother from the crime that she committed. It's possible either of the two family members could've killed Boone and what starts out to be a clean cut case for the prosecution soon becomes more convoluted.

Continue: The Whole Truth Trailer

Keanu Reeves' Visit To Parliament Sends Post-Brexit Twitter Into A Meltdown


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Actor Keanu Reeves unexpectedly turned up at Portcullis House on Tuesday (June 28) leaving us all to wonder if he’d come to save the country after Brexit. The actor posed for selfies with MPs during his visit, while Twitter rolled out every Matrix-related Brexit gag you could possibly think of.

Continue reading: Keanu Reeves' Visit To Parliament Sends Post-Brexit Twitter Into A Meltdown

The Neon Demon Trailer


The Neon Demon follows the journey of its protagonist Jesse (Elle Fanning) when she makes the move to Los Angeles as an aspiring model. Jesse is a young female that has been recruited by a fashion designer, as the typical girl from a small town with big dreams who wants to make it big in the modelling industry. However Jesse is not your typical model as she is described as a dangerous girl in the sense that the narrative soon takes a sinister turn. 

Continue: The Neon Demon Trailer

How Makers Of Action-Comedy 'Keanu' Got The Actor Himself To Provide The Voice Of A Cat


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The director of the imminently released movie Keanu have spoken about how they eventually managed to get Keanu Reeves to provide a voiceover role in the film – at the very last minute!

The action-comedy film concerns two friends, played by comedians Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele, who go in search of the titular cat, who is lost. 51 year old Reeves was initially approached to take part in the movie, considering it bore his unusual name, but he turned the opportunity down last year.

So, the makers went ahead anyway and completed the movie, releasing a trailer in early February. This was seen by Reeves’ sister, who mentioned to him that it looked great and told him he should get involved.

Continue reading: How Makers Of Action-Comedy 'Keanu' Got The Actor Himself To Provide The Voice Of A Cat

Keanu Trailer


Rell has just broken up with his partner and he's in a complete self-absorbed world. Continuously housebound and alone, he feels like his life has ended. Enter Keanu. When Rell hears a faint meowing coming from outside his house he discovers a young kitten on his doorstep just waiting to find a new home. Suddenly, Rell feels a new sense of life, his kitten is the best thing to ever happen to him and Rell's best friend, Clarence, completely confirms these feelings. 

Finally able to leave the house, Rell and Clarence go out only to return to find Keanu gone and only his little kitten collar left. So begins a quest to save Keanu. It turns out that the kitten has been taken by a local gangster, in order to get Rell's new pride and joy back, the two are going to have to get down and dirty in a world far from their usual suburban lifestyle. 

Keanu was directed by Peter Atencio and written by Jordan Peele and Alex Rubens.

Exposed Trailer


Scotty Galban and his partner Joey are New York City cops, whilst Scotty usually sticks to the rules, his partner has been tempted by dirty money. When Joey is found on an underground rail road track with a knife in his back, Scotty immediately goes to the scene.

Scotty wants justive for his partner but he also knows Joey was taking money from drug dealers and by finding his murderers, he might just bring a lot of dark secrets to light that are best kept unknown. With few leads, Galban begins to piece together his partners last steps and his dodgy dealings - one of his first leads him to a teacher, Isabel, who he feels is connected to the case in more ways than she's letting on.

Exposed is a gritty 'whodunnit' based in a modern day New York City directed by Declan Dale.

Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves arrives at Los Angeles International (LAX) Airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd September 2015

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Keanu Reeves - Rodeo Drive presents Concours d'Elegance in Beverly Hills at Rodeo Drive - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 21st June 2015

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves arrives at Los Angeles International (LAX) airport at LAX - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 27th May 2015

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves chats on his mobile phone as he departs from LAX airpot in Los Angeles - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 23rd January 2015

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) carrying Louis Vuitton luggage - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 23rd January 2015

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American Hollywood actor Keanu Reeves was photographed as he came in to LAX airport in Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 19th December 2014

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21 Years: Richard Linklater - Clips


Indie filmmaking is one of the best niches to find super-talented directors and writers; and none more so than Richard Linklater. Having recently received a flood of praise for the extraordinary and innovative 'Boyhood' - a movie filmed over thirteen years with the same actors - actors and movie makers everywhere join this appraising documentary marking 21 years of amazing cinema from this artist. With works including the decade spanning romance trilogy 'Before Sunrise', musical comedy 'School of Rock', animated thriller 'A Scanner Darkly', crime drama 'Bernie' and underdog flicks 'Slacker' and 'Bad News Bears', the Texan cine-hero continues to produce imaginative and totally unique, genre-crossing stories with comedy 'That's What I'm Talking About' and a 'School of Rock' TV series marking his upcoming projects.

Continue: 21 Years: Richard Linklater - Clips

"Ouija" Brings Scares To The Box Office Ahead Of Halloween


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Clearly, moviegoers are already getting into the Halloween spirit this weekend and the not-so-highly rated horror flick Ouija reigns supreme at the box office. After a highly contested weekend, the film about a group of high-schoolers, who get into trouble after an attempt to contact their dead friend checked in with $20 million. Meanwhile, the Keanu Reeves starrer John Wick (a Tom Cruise-style action flick, except with less plot) came out of nowhere to score second place with $14,1 million (stats according to Box Office Mojo).

Watch the Ouija trailer below... if you dare.

Fury, riding on favourable reviews and Brad Pitt-heavy marketing, ended up third, but it was a close race. The psychological war drama… thing checked in with $13 million. This brings Fury’s total to an impressive $46 million – not a great performance outside the winter season, but with a great fan approval rating (90% of fans liked it, according to Rotten Tomatoes) and great critical performance (77% “fresh”) it’s already gathering some early Oscar buzz.

Continue reading: "Ouija" Brings Scares To The Box Office Ahead Of Halloween

Is Brad Pitt's 'Fury' Too Violent?


Brad Pitt David Ayer David Fincher Keanu Reeves

It was undoubtedly the star pulling power of Brad Pitt that helped David Ayer's World War II drama Fury accelerate past Gone Girl to the top of the box-office this weekend. Pitt and his tank buddies took $23.5 million in ticket sales to finish at No.1, whilst David Fincher's mystery thriller took a creditable $17.8 million to drop to second place.

Fury'Fury' is said to be one of the most violent movies of the year

In third place was Fox's animated feature The Book of Life, which took $17 million, and Disney's Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day took $12 million. 

Continue reading: Is Brad Pitt's 'Fury' Too Violent?

Guest, Chad Stahelski, David Leitch and Keanu Reeves - Celebs took to the red carpet for the special screening of 'John Wick' in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 13th October 2014

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Keanu Reeves, After Discovering Stranger In His Library, Remains Almost Superhumanly Calm


Keanu Reeves Jennifer Lopez Sandra Bullock

We've seen Keanu Reeves defy gravity and jump between realities as Neo in The Matrix, but we weren't prepared for how incredibly calm he reportedly remained when faced with a complete stranger in his own home.

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Keanu Reeves remained calm when faced with an intruder in his home.

Read More: Will Keanu Reeves Ever Be A Big Box Office Star Again?

Continue reading: Keanu Reeves, After Discovering Stranger In His Library, Remains Almost Superhumanly Calm

Keanu Reeves - Champs-Élysées Film Festival - 'Man of Tai Chi' - Premiere - Paris, France - Saturday 14th June 2014

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Gerard Butler Quits 'Point Break' Remake, But Who Will Replace Him?


Gerard Butler Keanu Reeves Luke Bracey Patrick Swayze

Gerard Butler has quit the Point Break remake because of a confluence of factors, including creative differences and a scheduling conflict. Butler was set to play the Zen-infused thief originally played by Patrick Swayze, opposite Keanu Reeves' Johnny Utah in the 1990s classic action movie. Luke Bracey will take Keanu's role in the remake. 

Gerard ButlerGerard Butler, Chilling at the Beach

Point Break will start shooting in late June and will last several months, though Ericson Core and his team are on the hunt for a new star. Insiders say production company Alcon is intent on maintaining its start date and will recast the part in the coming weeks, according to the Hollywood Reporter. 

Continue reading: Gerard Butler Quits 'Point Break' Remake, But Who Will Replace Him?

Keanu Reeves On Being The '47 Ronin' Samurai Outcast, The Inspiring Cast And Not Speaking Japanese [Video]


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Keanu Reeves has spoken about his latest role as Kai, the orphan-turned-warrior, who is an outcast due to his half British, half Japanese background. 47 Ronin may not have fared well at the hands of critics but for those who love historical action movies, a little fantasy and enough CGI and special effects to make your eyes water, the action epic is sure to be a hit nonetheless.

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Keanu Reeves Talks About His Character Kai In The Movie '47 Ronin.'

In the film, Kai is saved from a brutal life of slavery by the mysterious Tengu monks and joins a small group of Japanese samurai warriors. The group are exiled after the dishonourable death of their leader and Kai is enlisted into the "47 Ronin," an elite group of fighters who vow to seek revenge against the army that has killed their master.

Continue reading: Keanu Reeves On Being The '47 Ronin' Samurai Outcast, The Inspiring Cast And Not Speaking Japanese [Video]

Big Surprise: Keanu Reeves' 47 Ronin Is Total Rubbish, Critics Say


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It’s quite telling that Keanu Reeves’ best effort - on Rotten Tomatoes at least - is a documentary about the rise of technology in film – an interesting and engaging subject for film lovers and geeks, something nearly all movie critics would claim to be.

47 RoninWill 'Ronin' become a cult hit?

After that, films from the 80s and 90s, like 'Dangerous Liasons', 'Speed', 'The Matrix' and 'Parenthood', are the only ones with unanimous critical praise. The reviews since the turn of the millennium, though, paint a slightly different picture, with 'The Matrix Reloaded' his biggest critical success at 73%.

Continue reading: Big Surprise: Keanu Reeves' 47 Ronin Is Total Rubbish, Critics Say

A Week In Movies: Stars Come Out In London, We Get A Glimpse Of The New Jack Ryan, And Keanu Brings Us A Japanese Fantasy


Kate Winslet Josh Brolin Judi Dench Steve Coogan Joseph Gordon-Levitt Julia Louis-Dreyfus Chris Pine Shia LaBeouf Keanu Reeves George Clooney

A very pregnant Kate Winslet joined Josh Brolin on the red carpet to present Labor Day

The stars continue to be out in London in the second week of the 57th London Film Festival. Judi Dench and Steve Coogan were on-hand with their new film Philomena, Joseph Gordon-Levitt got the crowd screaming outside the cinema before the screening of his writing-directing debut Don John, and. Click here for Philomena trailer and pics, or here for pics and the trailer for Don Jon and you can browse through our photo gallery of this week's Labor Day premiere in London.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus was also at the festival with filmmaker Nicole Holofcener for the UK premiere of their intelligent, offbeat romantic-comedy Enough Said, which features one of the final performances from the late James Gandolfini. It opens in British cinemas this weekend. You can read our Enough Said review here.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Stars Come Out In London, We Get A Glimpse Of The New Jack Ryan, And Keanu Brings Us A Japanese Fantasy

Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves seen out and about with a female companion in Manhattan - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 17th June 2013

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Keanu Reeves - Celebrities out and about during the 66th Cannes Film Festival - Day 7 - Cannes, France - Tuesday 21st May 2013

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Keanu Reeves - Movie stills for Keanu Reeves directorial debut MAN OF TAI CHI, which premiere's at the 66th Cannes International Film Festival - Cannes, France - Monday 20th May 2013

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Keanu Reeves - 66th Cannes Film Festival - Man of Tai Chi - photocall - Cannes, France - Saturday 1st January 2000

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves seen onboard a luxury yacht during the 66th Cannes Film Festival - Day 5 - Cannes, France - Sunday 19th May 2013

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Keanu Reeves and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Tuesday 23rd October 2012 Premiere of 'Cloud Atlas' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Keanu Reeves and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Keanu Reeves and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Keanu Reeves Saturday 20th October 2012 2nd Annual Reel Stories, Real Lives benefiting The Motion Picture & Television Fund - Arrivals

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Keanu Reeves Thursday 9th August 2012 The premiere of 'Side By Side' held at The Museum of Modern Art

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves' 1973 Norton Commando 750 motorcycyle Los Angeles, California - A woman parking on Roxbury Drive backed her Mercedes GLK SUV into Keanu Reeves' classic 1973 Norton Commando 750 motorcycyle, while the actor was inside a medical building. The Beverly Hills Police were called to the scene and reported the details to Reeves upon his departure from the building. The star was seen checking his bike over before taking the necessary insurance details of the woman from the police officer, in case he has damage to report after a further assessment Thursday 6th October 2011

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Keanu Reeves Wednesday 22nd September 2010 on the set of his new film 'Generation Um' New York City, USA

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Keanu Reeves Tuesday 14th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Henry's Crime' press conference held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Toronto, Canada

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Keanu Reeves - Keanu Reeves leaving the InterContinental Toronto, Canada - during the 35th Toronto International Film Festival Monday 13th September 2010

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The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review


Excellent
As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama is subtle and unpredictable. It also features terrific performances from an eclectic cast.

Pippa (Wright) is married to the much-older Herb (Arkin), a publisher who hates that he's now retired. But it's Pippa whose world is starting to unravel, as she reaches the point where she needs more than being a trophy wife and mother to two now-grown kids (Kazan and McDonald). Her sleepwalking antics indicate that her subconscious has already figured this out, but it'll take a look at her childhood (played by Lively and youngster Madeline McNulty) to help her see what she needs to do next.

Continue reading: The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review

The Day The Earth Stood Still (2008) Review


Very Good
Remakes are the bane of many a film fan's existence. Some are strident in their wholesale hatred, while others take a "wait and see" stance before eventually dismissing the attempted upgrade. Of course, by doing so, they have ignored quite a few quality films (Cronenberg's The Fly, Jackson's King Kong, Scorsese's The Departed). Yet in general, when a modern filmmaker takes on a considered classic, they run the risk of embarrassing themselves and the material being remade. A true masterwork from the '50s, Robert Wise's The Day the Earth Stood Still is considered "verboten" by purists. An update stands as a disaster waiting to happen, right? Actually, no.

When a huge spherical object lands in New York's Central Park, a first response team led by members of the military and scientific community set out to explore its purpose. Dr. Helen Benson (Jennifer Connelly) makes contact with a strange being exiting the orb, but said creature is accidentally shot by a soldier, mandating immediate medical care. Eventually, the humanoid-looking alien named Klaatu (Keanu Reeves) explains his purpose. Mankind's lack of environmental concern and overall violent nature has led other civilized planets to mandate the destruction of the entire population. While the Secretary of Defense (Kathy Bates) plans an armed solution, Helen helps Klaatu escape, and along with her stepson Jacob (Jaden Smith), she tries to convince the extraterrestrial emissary that humanity is worth saving.

Continue reading: The Day The Earth Stood Still (2008) Review

Point Break Review


Excellent
It's hard to decide whether Point Break is a really bad good movie or a really good bad movie. On one hand, it boasts thrilling, original action sequences, a tightly woven caper plot, and a cast jam-packed with Hollywood middleweights acting -- and surfing -- their asses off. On the other hand, it also suffers from terrifying leaps of story logic, a vacuous emotional core, and some of the silliest dialogue ever spoken onscreen. It's a Hollywood formula movie at its best and worst. At the center of this conundrum is the greatest acting enigma of the age -- Keanu Reeves. Never has a man acted so poorly, spoken lines so blandly, for the cinematic enjoyment of so many. He churns out unintentionally comic performances in blockbuster after blockbuster, each time raising the question of how exactly he landed the role, and how much worse the movie would be without him. I suppose the answers to these riddles don't matter much, because, no matter how you come down on these weighty issues, when the dust settles, two indisputable points clearly emerge: Point Break is great fun to watch and Reeves was born to play the part of FBI agent Johnny Utah.

The story is your basic high-concept Hollywood action premise. Utah is a young, eager FBI agent assigned to the Los Angeles bank robbery task force. His crusty veteran partner, Angelo Pappas (Gary Busey), has been trying for years to bring down a highly professional crew of bank robbers called the Ex-Presidents (known as such because they disguise themselves with novelty masks of former presidents during their robberies). Despite the ridicule of his colleagues, Pappas has long held the belief that the Ex-Presidents are surfers who use the robbery money to fund their presumably lavish lifestyle. So, with nothing else to go on, Pappas and Utah come up with the plan that Utah will go undercover as a surfer in order to infiltrate the beach-loving subculture and bring down the Ex-Presidents.

Continue reading: Point Break Review

A Scanner Darkly Review


Weak

When Richard Linklater released Waking Life in 2001, he became the granddaddy of a whole new kind of filmmaking process. The film had been shot and edited like a normal feature, then sent to computer jocks who basically painted over each frame, giving the images a surreal quality of undulating colors that fell somewhere between photography and animation -- an acid-trip philosophy lesson.

Linklater returns to the same technique once again (and for the last time, from what he has said, due to rampant production difficulties) for a much more literal acid trip. Based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name, A Scanner Darkly is a feature-length PSA on the evils of drugs and the potentially-as-damaging efforts to ferret them out of society.

Continue reading: A Scanner Darkly Review

The Lake House Review


OK

Director Alejandro Agresti's The Lake House, based on a South Korean film called Il Mare, takes the premise that launched movies such as Back to the Future and Frequency and asks, "What would a good boyfriend do with these powers?" The powers in this case involve a mystical mailbox that connects two would-be lovers who are living two years apart. Unfortunately, the answer to that question ends up being "Nothing interesting enough to last for almost two hours."

Alex Wyler (Keanu Reeves) is an architect living in Chicago who has recently bought the lake house built by his cold, uncaring father (Christopher Plummer). Kate Forster (Sandra Bullock) is a doctor living in Chicago who has recently moved out of the same house. She leaves a note in the mailbox for the next tenant, which is received by Alex who, puzzled by the note's references to objects that aren't there (yet), writes back. Eventually the two figure out that they are, in fact, living in different years - Alex in 2004, and Kate in 2006. She doesn't bother to tell him how the election turned out.

Being lonely workaholic types and apparently lacking a broadband connection, they decide to continue the correspondence. Rather than ask for stock tips or sports scores, Alex opts instead to do little favors for Kate, planting a tree that will later grow out in front of her apartment complex, or leaving graffiti for her on a wall that no one bothers to clean or write over for two years. As they grow closer, Alex discovers why he can't be with Kate in his present, while Kate struggles with trying to meet him in hers.

The Lake House is the type of film that could make a fantastic half hour episode of The Twilight Zone, but needs to bring a lot more to the table if it wants to stretch to feature length. For starters, the dialogue does not sound like it came from the pen of a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, but that's David Auburn's name right there in the opening credits. Reeves and Bullock are serviceable in their roles, with Reeves playing 10 percent less wooden than usual and Bullock conveying forlorn with aplomb, but none of this is terribly new or interesting. If anything, Alex's B-plot relationship with his father, which prompts a speech Auburn must have copied and pasted from a better script he had lying around, merits more screen time than the A-plot it barely services.

Agresti's direction at times results in some interesting visuals, including clever attempts to show the pair occupying the same space at different times in one shot. Meanwhile, attempts to have the characters verbalize their written correspondence just make them seem like they're talking to themselves. And while the story has some fun with the notion of a postal bridge across time, the poorly concealed plot points make it seem like there's some mystical mailbox at the end of the film sending us everything that's going to happen before we're halfway into the movie.

In the end, The Lake House is not a particularly bad film, but it's not a particularly good one, either. It smacks mostly of wasted potential, and the sense that the phrase "close enough" informed too many choices. If I were sending letters back in time to someone advising them on which films to skip, I'd probably forget to even mention this.

Pass the salt, Sady.

The Watcher Review


Bad
Keanu Reeves, get thee back to The Matrix as soon as possible.

Following one of the most pitiful title sequences I've ever seen, The Watcher actually proceeds to become one of the most pitiful thrillers I've ever seen. And that takes some doing... but let me tell you how.

Continue reading: The Watcher Review

Hardball Review


Bad
Brian Robbins' Hardball is quite the cinematic achievement. In about two hours, we get a glancing examination of ghetto life, a funeral with a heartfelt eulogy, speeches about never giving up, a cache of cute kids (including a fat one with asthma), a hard-luck gambler who finds salvation in a good woman and a climactic "big game," where the underdogs prove to have a bigger bite than anyone ever imagined.

All that's needed is a guy getting hit in the nuts and a food fight to have the first film solely based on cinematic clichés. I can't wait to see the deleted scenes when it comes out on DVD.

Continue reading: Hardball Review

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure Review


Excellent
The obvious inspirations for Wayne and Garth, Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves) first hit history in this witty, winning tale of two modern-day So-Cal misfits who end up travelling through time. The impetus? A future society bases all of its culture on the music Bill and Ted's band, Wyld Stallyns (And notably the phrase, "Be excellent to each other") -- but all of that might never happen if the burnouts don't get their history report done.

Alas, it doesn't look good. Bill and Ted are walking mistakes as it is. They can't pronounce Socrates and believe Caeser was "a salad dressing dude." But their grasp of superlative adjectives like triumphant and gnarly is impressive indeed, so maybe there's hope.

Continue reading: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure Review

Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey Review


Excellent
Alex Winter, where art thou dude? At a time when even Pauley Shore can make a Weasel-free comeback, you are still wandering in the wilderness. For those who clocked out after Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey I have only one word, Freaked. Can you believe that Ortiz the Dog boy is now saving the world on a yearly basis? Bogus, dude.

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure was a tremendous hit in 1989 and a sequel was immediately in the works. Where the first film took our stoner heroes through time, Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey upped the ante and took them to hell. Literally, the original title of the film was Bill & Ted Go to Hell. The plot is awash in weird humor and outlandish gags as Bill and Ted attempt to defeat two evil robotic versions of themselves, avoid death, save history, and otherwise remain cool.

Continue reading: Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey Review

Feeling Minnesota Review


Terrible
In case you've been wondering, Feeling Minnesota is a film "inspired by a line in a Soundgarden song." This little fun fact is about as interesting as the film ever gets, and the wary moviegoer is well-advised to limit his Minnesota experience to looking at a poster for the film in the movie theater's lobby. And even then, you shouldn't look at the poster for very long.

As near as I can tell, this is the story of Jjaks (Keanu Reeves, and no that's not a typo), his brother Sam (Vincent D'Onofrio, "Gomer Pyle" from Full Metal Jacket), and Sam's slutty new wife Freddie (Cameron Diaz). Everyone's pretty miserable (ostensibly having something to do with their humdrum Minnesota existence). And Sam and Jjaks fight a lot (ostensibly over Freddie).

Continue reading: Feeling Minnesota Review

The Matrix Review


Extraordinary
What many people forget when comparing The Matrix to its own sequels (or the Star Wars prequels, or any other maligned sci-fi epic) is that this 1999 original has bad dialogue too. In fact, search the entire trilogy for a line more cringe-inducing than "Buckle up, Dorothy, 'cause Kansas is going bye-bye," spoken by poor, wonderful Joe Pantoliano. I don't care how silly you think it is when Neo (Keanu Reeves) calls Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) "Trin" in Revolutions -- Wizard of Oz references "updated" into snarky baby-talk are worse. Series masterminds the Wachowski Brothers, like George Lucas, are aces with yarns and anything but light-fingered as writers.

Some of the grumpier nerds also love to point out that The Matrix rips off a bunch of anime; I usually can't care less about anime, but I would point out that its story has a lot in common with Dark City, which came out over a year earlier.

Continue reading: The Matrix Review

My Own Private Idaho Review


Extraordinary
Mike Waters (River Phoenix) is a narcoleptic street hustler who lives in the bus terminal, streets, and abandoned buildings of Portland, Oregon, and who dreams of one day finding his mother. Fellow hustler Scott Favor (Keanu Reeves) takes care of Mike - he hauls the other man to safety when a sudden sleeping spell comes upon him, usually triggered by stress or memories of home - and although he too lives in the streets and makes a living accommodating the sexual whims of paying customers, he's the scion of a wealthy and powerful Portland family with every reason to believe that that wealth and power will one day be his own. Mike's in love with Scott; he says as much one night when Scott is explaining that love is something customers pay you to provide. "I love you and you don't pay me," Mike counters. In this lowlife milieu, such a bare declaration amounts to an act of grace. But Scott lets it pass and the moment slides by.

Phoenix, in interviews, was clearly thrilled when writer/director Gus Van Sant credited him with having written this scene in Van Sant's wonderful 1991 movie My Own Private Idaho. He should have been. Emotionally, it's a doozy, and it serves as the point at which these two fractured lives separate into their own trajectories. Mike's takes him back again and again to the same dogged search for love and the same stretch of empty highway. Scott's takes him to Italy, where he falls in love with the beautiful Carmella (Chiara Caselli) and, ultimately, to an encounter in Portland with his street mentor Bob (William Richert). Here the movie takes an unexpected Shakespearean turn as Van Sant lifts fragments from Henry IV, casting Scott as Prince Hal to Bob's Falstaff, even as Mike's story continues on in the real world. We know from Shakespeare that Scott will turn his back on his old friends and assume the throne in the end. If Mike is heartbroken it's because life in the real world is hard; that's why we have private ones.

Continue reading: My Own Private Idaho Review

Dangerous Liaisons Review


Extraordinary
Until The Quiet American, this was only decent thing Christopher Hampton had ever written, and why shouldn't he, he had the source material to help him. The film famously follows backstabbing and intrigue in France, 200 or so years ago, as kissing cousins place a bet over whether Valmont (John Malkovich) can land prissy Marie (Michelle Pfeiffer), ruining countless lives along the way. It would be almost perfect if it wasn't for southern belle Swoosie Kurtz mucking up the works. Probably the best adaptation of the celebrated novel you can find.

Thumbsucker Review


OK
For once, the film's title is hardly a coy allusion or abstract metaphor - Thumbsucker is a movie about, yes, a thumbsucker. More specifically, he's a 17-year-old thumbsucker, a fact that hardly endears him to his schoolmates or family. As would be expected in most any film about a socially awkward teen, the story is ultimately about his maturation (or lack thereof) into the adult world. What it ends up being, however, is more like the chronicle of some hardworking parents stuck with a truly problematic son who's about as unlikable as it gets.

As parents Audrey and Mike Cobb, Tilda Swinton and Vincent D'Onofrio seem an odd choice, but it's an absolutely perfect one. Director Mike Mills may not have the best ear for story or subject matter (the source novel by Walter Kirn, should likely have been left on the unfilmed backlist) but he's dead-on when it comes to tone and casting. A pair of tired out working-class adults in a small Northwest town who can't quite accept being grownups, they have their two boys call them by their first names. Everything around them betrays this hope, of course, with Audrey working night shifts as a nurse at a celebrity drug treatment clinic just to catch a glimpse of an addict TV star she's got a girlish crush on, and Mike as the beaten-down manager of a sporting goods store unable to forget that but for an injury he could have gone pro.

Continue reading: Thumbsucker Review

I Love You To Death Review


Excellent
It's a film never particularly loved by audiences and unlikely to be rehabilitated by critics in the future, but I Love You to Death is nevertheless the perfect example of an overlooked gem. Coming right in the middle of director Lawrence Kasdan's extremely earnest period (The Accidental Tourist in 1988 and Grand Canyon in 1991), I Love You to Death took its cue from one of those true stories of horrific Americana that come bubbling through the tabloid mediasphere every few months and mined it for all its comic potential.

Kevin Kline plays Joey Boca - a guy who runs a pizza parlor in Seattle - as an oversexed, extremely Italian workaholic who is able to explain his chronic infidelity by saying with a straight face, "I'm a man, I got a lotta hormones in my body." It's a clown's performance, a filmmaker doesn't bring Kline in for this sort of role and demand subtlety but rather one that's so over-the-top it achieves a kind of genius that Kline also showcased in his similarly stereotypical role in A Fish Called Wanda (in that one, he played a clown's view of an American abroad, here he's the clowning pizza man, bad accent, bushy mustache and all).

Continue reading: I Love You To Death Review

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Review


Terrible
A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues... -Ed.

Don Willmott, 1 star [lowest rating]

Continue reading: Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Review

Something's Gotta Give Review


Very Good
Writer/director Nancy Meyers has penned a little ditty about Jack and Diane in Something's Gotta Give. Sure, they go by different names and actually attempt to construct characters separated from their recognizable personas. Borrowing a page from his own playbook, Jack plays a chauvinistic womanizer with a penchant for 20-year-old women. Diane's a successful playwright. But they're still Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton. They're the two-headed spectacle standing at center stage here, and our attention belongs on them.

The setup goes a little something like this. Jack's dating Marin (Amanda Peet), the feisty daughter of buttoned-up Diane. During a weekend trip to the Hamptons, Jack's libido loses out to his ticker, and he suffers a cardiac arrest. The local doctor (Keanu Reeves) prescribes plenty of bed rest for Jack, then makes a pitch for the lovely Diane, to her blushing delight.

Continue reading: Something's Gotta Give Review

The Devil's Advocate Review


Very Good
It takes a story this ridiculous to be this good. Imagine The Firm, but with the Devil. (Cue demonic laughter.) Keanu Reeves stars as a rising star of a lawyer, and Al Pacino stars as the Devil himself (sample line: "Call me dad!"). The movie plays perfectly into Pacino's penchant to overact the crap out of his part -- only this part has no limit to the attitude you can throw at it. The rest of the film is simply very well-made. Special effects, acting (particularly Charlize Theron as Keanu's sanity-vacating wife), music, set design -- it's all there. No, it ain't Oscar bait, it's just one, ahem, hell of a good time.

Johnny Mnemonic Review


OK
In 2021, when the world is basically ruled by corporate Japan, humans with microchip brain implants are used to transport the most important of data files. Computer networks are unsafe, because people can "jack in" and neo-physically enter the complex world of cyberspace, where a computer virus won't just knock out your computer, it'll kill you outright.

This is the world of writer William Gibson, and it seems like a pretty interesting place to visit. It's unfortunate that Johnny Mnemonic does very little in this setting and comes off as little more than a remake of Tron, without the lightcycle sequence.

Continue reading: Johnny Mnemonic Review

River's Edge Review


Extraordinary
Long before Laura Palmer's body was discovered wrapped in plastic, poor Jamie was strangled to death aside a lonely river, her unrepentant killer John (a creepy Daniel Roebuck, the guy who played Jay Leno in The Late Shift) taking it upon himself to prove to his friends what he's done. He's not giddy about it, he just wants acknowledgement and, somehow, understanding.

A gripping study of teen ambivalence and the utter lack of angst, River's Edge is a creepy, powerful, and underseen picture that features some virtuoso performances (notably Crispin Glover's Layne, who organizes an ill-conceived campaign to get John out of town). Featuring some of the most inventive and believable dialogue, the locals (including Keanu Reeves and Ione Skye as the only kids even remotely bothered by the death of their friend) are at a loss for what to do. Atmospheric and numbing, the picture is an obvious precursor to Twin Peaks, and a better template David Lynch couldn't have found. The story is loosely based on a real murder, which makes it all the more chilling.

Continue reading: River's Edge Review

The Matrix Reloaded Review


Excellent
In 1999, Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) uttered memorably, "Unfortunately, no one can be told what the Matrix is."

In 2003, no one needs to be told, because everyone fully knows what the Matrix is. The idea of the Matrix has entered the popular lexicon. Magazines, with utter seriousness, create polls asking whether readers think we are really living in the Matrix. And people say yes, apparently unable to realize that it is only a movie.

Continue reading: The Matrix Reloaded Review

Dracula (1992) Review


Very Good
Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of the Dracula story hasn't won any praise for its claim of being true to Bram Stoker's novel (despite the aka title, Bram Stoker's Dracula), but it is a huge success in one major front: Casting. Coppola has lined up a near-perfect cast, one which is actually inspired on some fronts. For starters, Gary Oldman makes for what may be the most memorable Dracula ever (I challenge you to name another besides Bela Lugosi), and Anthony Hopkins' Van Helsing is an intriguing -- and solid -- choice. It gets even better in the smaller roles: Richard E. Grant as a physician friend of Van Helsing, Bill Campbell as a gunslinging Texan who's wooing Miss Lucy (Sadie Frost in an absurd red wig), and -- best of all -- Tom Waits as a jibbering disciple of Dracula, locked away in an asylum. And watch for Monic Bellucci as one of Dracula's brides. Altogether it's a fun movie, full of gore and special effects that were groundbreaking at the time.

Sweet November Review


Bad
While Sweet November is actually a remake of a 1968 film, it plays more like a two-hour episode of that oh-so-quirky-but-loveable TV show Dharma and Greg. He's a straight-laced, career-oriented, workaholic suit; she's the funky clothes-wearing, fun-loving free spirit who changes his life. The only differences are that the movie has prettier stars, certainly less funny lines, and a much more downbeat ending. But, fear not, romantic drama fans; there's plenty of adorable puppy dogs and wide-eyed little kids to soften the blow.

One treat for you shallow ladies in the crowd (guilty!) is the return of Keanu Reeves as the romantic, studly leading man. He's still as dumb as a post, but he's the fitting hero to such a dumb and implausible tale. He plays Nelson Moss, a hot shot ad man with swank things but too regimented a life to enjoy them. After a fateful run-in with carefree Sarah Deever (Charlize Theron) at the DMV, she tracks him down, and tries to convince him that he should move into her shabby-chic hippie spread for a month to become a better man. Apparently, she's done this sort of thing with other men before him with great success.

Continue reading: Sweet November Review

Constantine Review


Weak

Almost every Catholicism-cloaked supernatural thriller since The Exorcist" has demonstrated an inherent lack of originality, falling back on the same tiresome genre staples: Possessed young women and tied-to-bed exorcisms, "lost" books of the Bible that allow the screenwriter to invent plot-convenient mythology, and a troubled hero trying to prevent some kind of demonic cross-over into our plane of existence.

One of the few exceptions was 1997's "The Devil's Advocate," in which Keanu Reeves gave one of his few truly fine performances as a gifted young defense lawyer whose life is torn apart when he accepts a prestige position in a big-city firm and discovers (too late) its literally Satanic origins. But apparently that was a fluke because Reeves is back to his usual monotoned self in "Constantine," revisiting the same genre as a routine demon-slayer who plays second fiddle to expensive special effects.

A chain-smoking tough-guy super-exorcist who lives in the grittiest part of downtown Los Angeles, John Constantine can see what normal mortals can't -- the angels and "soldier demons" who take human form and battle daily for men's souls. He has personally seen the nuclear-apocalypse-like fires of Hell (when technically dead for two minutes during a teenage suicide attempt) and has spent his life trying to buy his way into Heaven by dispatching devilspawn spirits back from whence they came, often with a golden, cross-shaped shotgun/flamethrower designed by an overzealous props department.

Continue reading: Constantine Review

Hardball Review


Good

Surprisingly, the redemption-by-baseball picture "Hardball" is not some warm-fuzzy "Bad News Bears" clone transplanted to the projects. It's considerably better than that.

Yes, it is about a drunk, gambling-addicted ticket scalper who spitefully agrees to coach a ghetto little league team for $500 a week to pay off a two angry bookies. Yes, the scalper is played by the historically vacuous Keanu Reeves, and yes, he's going to learn What's Really Important In Life from endearingly foul-mouthed street kids who live cautionary-tale type lives of inner city strife.

But as fast as "Hardball" sets up such eye-rolling clichés, director Brian Robbins knocks them down. There are no inspirational montages of the squad pulling together and honing their skills. The well-financed rival team? Present and accounted for, but not a major subplot. Ditto for the schoolteacher romantic interest (Diane Lane) and the headstrong tenement mom whose respect Reeves must earn.

Continue reading: Hardball Review

The Gift Review


Weak

Warning: This review begins with a wildly off-subject tangent.

O, woe! What hope can we have for director Sam Raimi's 2002 "Spider-Man" movie now that he has made two utterly conventional Hollywood flicks in a row?

Once a tongue-in-cheek sovereign of campy cult classics like "Evil Dead 2," "Darkman" and "The Quick and the Dead" -- not to mention the producer of TV's uber-campy "Xena" -- Raimi went straight two years ago with the chilling psychological thriller "A Simple Plan." Then last year he went soft with "For Love of the Game," a middling, maudlin baseball romance starring Kevin Costner.

Continue reading: The Gift Review

Sweet November Review


Good

"Sweet November" may be a work of romantic hokum about a savage power-yuppie who learns to slow down and discover love in the arms of a quirky, perky girl with a tragic secret -- but as such sappy movies go, this is one that hits all the right notes.

Keanu Reeves and Charlize Theron proved they have couples chemistry as husband and wife in "The Devil's Advocate." Here they do the opposites-attract thing with great success and use their charisma to overcome what by all rights should be a script full of romantic clichés.

Reeves plays shallow, ruthless, arrogant ad industry hotshot Nelson Moss, who shows his astronomical self-centeredness in the picture's opening scene. It's early morning and he's having sex with his girlfriend -- until his alarm clock goes off. The second it does, he says "thanks, that was great" before jumping up, walking across his uber-modern high-rent loft, turning on his entire wall of high-tech TVs and brainstorming an ad campaign for a major client.

Continue reading: Sweet November Review

The Replacements Review


Good

Keanu Reeves has finally begun to realize what kinds of roles he's right for: grunt cop in "Speed," computer hacker dude in "The Matrix," and now, a rise-to-the-occasion substitute football hero in "The Replacements."

He's perfect for the quarterback role in this entirely predictable but utterly entertaining gridiron comedy about a mixed bag of working class joes and forgotten college football stars rounded up to play again by an NFL team when their spoiled millionaire players go on strike.

Washed-up collegiate rocket-arm Shane Falco (Reeves) is living on a beat-up houseboat and makes a living scraping barnacles off the bottom of yachts when coach Jimmy McGinty (an ideally-cast Gene Hackman) comes calling, hoping Falco will don shoulder pads and a helmet once again and lead the fictional Washington Sentinels through the last four games of their unfinished season.

Continue reading: The Replacements Review

The Matrix Revolutions Review


OK

The eye-popping, heart-stopping last hour and a half of "The Matrix Revolutions" more than makes up for everything plodding and ponderous that has taken place since the mind-blowing first hour of the 1999 original.

Astonishing in scale and momentous in scope, it encompasses a spectacular battle between the scrappy, out-numbered but heavily armed defenders of Zion (humanity's last refugee city hidden deep beneath the Earth's scorched surface) and a million-strong swarm of enemy sentinels (those frightening, giant squid-shaped robots) invading from the machine-ruled surface world.

But the monstrous melee may be for naught if uber-human messiah Neo (Keanu Reeves) cannot defeat the invincibly evil, incalculably self-replicating rogue computer program known as Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) in a simultaneous, nuclear-strength airborne-kung-fu showdown inside what's left of the crumbling Matrix (that virtual world pulled over the eyes of the comatose majority of mankind kept in stasis by the machines who feed off our life-force).

Continue reading: The Matrix Revolutions Review

The Watcher Review


Terrible

Keanu Reeves may very well be the least convincing, least frightening serial killer in the history of the psycho-thriller genre in "The Watcher."

Starring as a supposedly brilliant whack job who strangles lonely young girls with piano wire, he delivers his dialogue as if every line ended with the word "dude" and somebody dubbed it out in post-production.

"Shall we dance (dude)?" he grins goofily at a simpering girl he's tied to a chair, shaking his ratty surfer hair from side to side as a voice-over by haunted FBI guy James Spader explains that Reeves likes to revive his victims over and over in order to torture them.

Continue reading: The Watcher Review

Alan Cumming Awkwardly Discovers And Refutes His 'Secret Marriage' To Keanu Reeves


Alan Cumming Keanu Reeves Melissa Etheridge

Alan Cumming, the Scottish actor known for 'Goldeneye' and 'Spy Kids', was recently confused by the knowledge that he and Keanu Reeves were married. The bisexual actor was astonished by the news in 2004, mostly due to the fact that he had never met the 'Matrix' star. 

Related: Critics On 'Cabaret': Alan Cumming And Michelle Williams Receive Near Rave Reviews

In a recent interview, Cumming stated "Someone had sent me this thing from this website and it said I had got married to Keanu. We got married in a secret ceremony, I wept throughout the entire thing, he was very butch about it all and Melissa Etheridge was there and she hummed one of her songs whilst we were getting married. Can't remember, but some other gay people were there."

Continue reading: Alan Cumming Awkwardly Discovers And Refutes His 'Secret Marriage' To Keanu Reeves

Keanu Reeves

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Keanu Reeves

Date of birth

2nd September, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.86




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Keanu Reeves Movies

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John Wick: Chapter 2 - Featurette Trailer

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John Wick Trailer

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21 Years: Richard Linklater Trailer

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