Kath Soucie

Kath Soucie

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The Tigger Movie Review


Extraordinary
Bouncy, flouncy, trouncy, pouncy, fun, fun, fun, fun, fun. The wonderful thing about The Tigger Movie is it's fun for everyone. And it truly is. Guaranteed to bring both smiles and tears to every face, young and old alike, Walt Disney Pictures' The Tigger Movie is a refreshing surprise.

OK, I'll be the first to admit it - I wasn't looking forward to this picture. Yet another Disney animated epic, jam-packed with computer generated cels, overdone musical numbers, and one-dimensional characters that long ago stopped being characters and became cartoons. "More colorful fluff to sell t-shirts, pajamas and tennis shoes," I mumbled to myself as I took my seat. "Eye candy." But as the curtain drew up to reveal a pre-movie Disney-style mambo from Lou Vega (of "Mambo No.9" fame), I was whisked back to a time when a man named Walt Disney first introduced us to our imaginations.

Continue reading: The Tigger Movie Review

Return to Never Land Review


Excellent
Nothing against Disney, but I find it sad that Return to Never Land ranks among the best movies released in 2002 thus far. Every year I hope Hollywood will break tradition and release quality movies during the first few months of the new year. But every year, January and February roll around, and every year, the same putrid junk finds a home at the multiplexes.

This year is no exception. Given the competition, Return to Never Land, sequel to the classic Peter Pan, is more worthy of your precious time than most of what's showing on the big screen this month.

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Pooh's Heffalump Movie Review


OK
Points for a descriptive title: This is where Pooh and friends discover the Heffalump, a purple elephant heretofore thought to be mythical in the Hundred Acre Wood.

About an hour long, Heffalump didn't grab my two-year old, who thought the elephant was cute but then wandered away for programming on another TV where more actually happens.

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Return to Never Land Review


Excellent
Nothing against Disney, but I find it sad that Return to Never Land ranks among the best movies released in 2002 thus far. Every year I hope Hollywood will break tradition and release quality movies during the first few months of the new year. But every year, January and February roll around, and every year, the same putrid junk finds a home at the multiplexes.

This year is no exception. Given the competition, Return to Never Land, sequel to the classic Peter Pan, is more worthy of your precious time than most of what's showing on the big screen this month.

Continue reading: Return to Never Land Review

Rugrats Go Wild! Review


Terrible
You would have figured that with a show and movie series as delightfully cynical as Rugrats would have had the foresight to see that naming a movie with "Go Wild" in the title is just asking for insult. The similarities between the "Wild" movies go beyond the titles. Both take place in exotic getaway spots (a deserted island / a deserted alley outside a cheap New Orleans bar in Mardi Gras). Both involve a large cast of characters whose names you don't remember and whose voice you can barely make out through the sucking, slurping, or slurring of something or another. Oh yeah, and both are an utter waste of time unless your mind can't discern between binki-ness and kinkiness.

As if your kid will care, Rugrats Go Wild! is a cross between the shows Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys, in which a Rugrats family vacation leads to being stranded on a deserted island. The only other inhabitants are the Thornberrys, a dysfunctional set of explorers with a souped-up RV that makes the new Lexus SUVs look like bumper cars. The adults get the idea to start going Lord of the Flies. The babies get the idea to start going exploring, and I get the idea to leave the theatre before dealing with an extra hour and a half of wasted time.

Continue reading: Rugrats Go Wild! Review

The Tigger Movie Review


Extraordinary
Bouncy, flouncy, trouncy, pouncy, fun, fun, fun, fun, fun. The wonderful thing about The Tigger Movie is it's fun for everyone. And it truly is. Guaranteed to bring both smiles and tears to every face, young and old alike, Walt Disney Pictures' The Tigger Movie is a refreshing surprise.

OK, I'll be the first to admit it - I wasn't looking forward to this picture. Yet another Disney animated epic, jam-packed with computer generated cels, overdone musical numbers, and one-dimensional characters that long ago stopped being characters and became cartoons. "More colorful fluff to sell t-shirts, pajamas and tennis shoes," I mumbled to myself as I took my seat. "Eye candy." But as the curtain drew up to reveal a pre-movie Disney-style mambo from Lou Vega (of "Mambo No.9" fame), I was whisked back to a time when a man named Walt Disney first introduced us to our imaginations.

Continue reading: The Tigger Movie Review

The Rugrats Movie Review


Excellent
So I'm a little late in writing this review. I really don't care. Neither do Tommy or Dill or Angelica or Chucky, who have pretty much been chased out of their playpen box-office by the funny but unintelligent A Bug's Life. But this movie suceeds where both A Bug's Life and it's competitor Antz failed: in creating a kids-love/adults-love movie. Kids love A Bug's Life, Adults love Antz. Both of them love Rugrats.

The most intelligent cartoon since The Simpsons (which the same animation team behind Rugrats worked on) has come to the big screen. It's a look at the babies of the new all-American parents: both at work, both armed with cell phones and faxes. They're raised by their sleeping grandfather and are intelligent beyond their single year.

Continue reading: The Rugrats Movie Review

Piglet's Big Movie Review


Good
It's hard to believe that Piglet's Big Movie has made any money over the last two weeks. In an era were kids are used to fancy animation and lots of eye-twitching excitement, this latest entry in the classic Winnie the Pooh cartoons/stories is such an anomaly. Lessons are taught with a pat on the back, not with a blaring soundtrack. You can actually appreciate the detail of the backgrounds and the way the animals talk. And Carly Simon songs are featured throughout the movie. She's old enough to be (gasp!) someone's grandmother!

When you're a revered part of childhoods galore, even Disney can afford not to play overt marketing games. Thank goodness. If I had kids, I would take them to Piglet's Big Movie because it feels like a storybook--you get a chance to take in what's onscreen and not get bombarded with toy advertisements and contemporary alterations (let's say: Tigger as a laid-back, smack talking skateboard champ).

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Rugrats in Paris: The Movie Review


Good
Well, the Rugrats are back, and, as usual, they're way too sophisticated for their audience. The Simpsons of the Nickelodeon Network has meandered its way back onto the big screen, and this time they are hitting the streets of Paris with more Freudian slips than a sexually-charged first date.

To start with, Grandpa Lou has gotten remarried (leading into, by the way, an excellent parody of The Godfather in the first scene) and all Chuckie wants is a mommy. Meanwhile, Stu Pickles gets a call from Paris demanding that he come to fix a giant mechanical Reptar (a wonderful running Godzilla/Pokemon spoof gag from the series) which he designed.

Continue reading: Rugrats in Paris: The Movie Review

Rugrats In Paris Review


Unbearable

Maybe it's just me, but doesn't it seem flagrantly irresponsible to market a cartoon to kids in which a diaper brigade of babies have wonderful adventures when they wander away from their parents and get lost?

I've never seen the "Rugrats" TV show, but the plots of both nerve-grinding movies that the Nickelodeon series has spawned have involved children disappearing, and treated such events as a cornucopia of light-hearted entertainment.

I might be a little sensitive to the subject, but in a cultural climate in which kids seem to get kidnapped (and often murdered) more and more frequently, do we really want G-rated movies giving our little ones the impression that going missing is great fun?

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The Tigger Movie Review


OK

The outcome of "The Tigger Movie," in which Winnie the Pooh's bouncy-trouncy pal sets out in search of others of his stripe, is pretty much a foredrawn conclusion. After all, "the most wonderful thing about Tiggers is I'm the only one," right?

So obviously the spring-loaded, faux feline is predestined to learn that his friends at Pooh Corner are his real family -- and the audience is asked to just enjoy the journey.

What an easy assignment. One hundred-percent in the spirit and style of the timeless Pooh 'toons everyone knows and loves (illustrated book pages turning between chapters and all the familiar trappings), this first full-length feature for Christopher Robin's stuffed animals is an amiable adventure with sweet wit and a warm heart rarely seen in kids movies anymore.

Continue reading: The Tigger Movie Review

Return To Never Land Review


Grim

With this week's theatrical release of "Return to Never Land" and the video release of "Cinderella 2" on February 26, Disney has blatantly abandoned any and all pretense of making cartoons for love, for art or for the entertainment of children. Flimsy, forced, fabricated sequels to beloved classics are about one thing: money.

Disney has been doing straight-to-video sequels for years, but until recently the studio has had the decency not to desecrate its more timeless pictures. Now it seems anything is fair game -- even stories that end with the clear and definitive summation that "they live happily ever after."

"Peter Pan" has a little looser finale and has, of course, been sequelized once before. But while Steven Spielberg was reverential, funny and wonderfully creative in the liberties he took in "Hook" -- starring Robin Williams as an stuffy adult Peter who rediscovers his inner child -- "Return to Never Land" is nothing but a recycling of the same tired themes Disney has beaten to death in nearly every animated feature they've released in the last 15 years.

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