Kate Ashfield

Kate Ashfield

Kate Ashfield Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

'Till We Meet Again' Premiere

Kate Ashfield - 'Till We Meet Again' premiere at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 20th October 2015

Kate Ashfield

Art For Animals Fundraiser Art Event

Kate Ashfield - Art for Animals fundraiser art event hosted by Alison Eastwood at De Re Gallery at De Re Gallery - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 5th June 2015

Kate Ashfield

Opening Night Of 'The Vortex' - Arrivals

Dan Fredenburgh and Kate Ashfield - Stars were photographed as they attended the Opening night of the play 'The Vortex' written by Noel Coward, The night was held at The Matrix Theatre in Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th November 2014

Dan Fredenburgh and Kate Ashfield

Believe Review


Very Good

With its heart in the right place, this charming British football drama overcomes a script that frequently drifts into sentimentality and corny plotting. But the story is involving, and the cast is particularly good. So even though it has a tendency to drift into cuteness, a fresh sense of humour and sympathetic characters help build up a swell of honest emotion as it approaches the final whistle.

It's set in 1984 Manchester, where the legendary Manchester United manager Matt Busby (Brian Cox) is still haunted by the Munich plane crash in 1958 that took the lives of several of his dream-team players. In search of something to give meaning to his retirement years, he runs across a street-smart 10-year-old named Georgie (Jack Smith), who has his own issues. Georgie lives with his working-class single mum Erica (Natascha McElhone), who worries about his future and leaps at the chance of a scholarship to send him to a posh private school. Georgie isn't thrilled about studying for the entrance exam with snooty professor Farquar (Toby Stephens); he'd rather be out kicking a ball with his friends, and is secretly plotting to enter a youth competition with them. But they need an adult sponsor, so Matt and his friend Bob (Philip Jackson) agree to take them on. And the kids have no idea that they're being trained by a national icon.

Director David Scheinmann shoots the film with sundrenched charm, grounding the goofier moments by encouraging the cast to give deeply felt performances. At the centre, Cox and Jackson are an entertaining double act as old pals kickstarting their lives by taking on this young team overflowing with raw talent but no discipline. McElhone is essentially playing the standard movie mother who's too busy with the pressures of everyday life to notice much of anything that her tearaway son is doing, but she gives the role a sharp emotional centre. Stephens has more trouble in his rather wacky role, which drifts from callous nastiness to physical slapstick.

Continue reading: Believe Review

8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party

Kate Ashfield - 8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 23rd April 2014

Kate Ashfield
Kate Ashfield

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer


Joe is a fiercely determined 50-year-old woman whose sexual drive has taken over her entire life. Her story of how she ended up injured in an alleyway and subsequently being nursed back to health by the curious Seligman deepens and darkens in this half of the story, as she relays tales of how her sexuality has caused so much damage. In a bid to somehow recover from her nymphomania, she attends a therapy group, but she also can't resist meeting a therapist of a different kind as she finds new and more dangerous ways to challenge herself and her sexuality. Her pleasure through pain has led her to a potential job with a group of criminals who are looking for somebody to inflict pain on their victims. But with such instable people around her, just how close is she to landing in some serious trouble?

Continue: Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

The Worlds End Premiere

Kate Ashfield - The Worlds End Premiere - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Thursday 22nd August 2013

Kate Ashfield
Kate Ashfield

Byzantium Review


Very Good

Nearly 20 years after Interview With the Vampire, Neil Jordan returns to the genre to breath some new life into a mythology that has grown stale, predictable and rather mopey  (see Twilight). With a lively script by Buffini, Jordan creates a lushly stylish dramatic thriller that continually takes us aback with off-beat storytelling and complex characters who don't always do what we expect them to.

The story centres on mother-daughter immortals Clara and Eleanor (Arterton and Ronan), who are on the run when they arrive in a fading British seaside town. The resourceful Clara seduces the nervous Noel (Mays) so they can stay in his dilapidated Byzantium guesthouse. To earn some cash, the always resourceful Clara turns the empty rooms into a brothel. Meanwhile, Eleanor befriends the fragile young Frank (Jones) and reveals the fact that she and her mother are actually more than 200 years old and need human blood to survive. Through all of this, they're being chased by two elder vampires, the ruthless Ruthven (Miller) and the more sympathetic Darvell (Riley), both of whom share a tangled romantic past with Clara.

Unusually intelligent, the film holds our interest with an astonishing series of twists and turns plus an array of colourful characters that play on stereotypes. Holding it all together is a fairly simple plot that reveals itself in bits and pieces until the full picture comes into focus. From this point, we pretty much know what has to happen in the big finale, but watching events unfold is satisfying and sometimes both thrilling and moving.

Continue reading: Byzantium Review

Byzantium Trailer


Clara and Eleanor are a mother and daughter, born two centuries ago as vampires and surviving only on the blood of mortal beings. They escape to an English seaside town and are taken into an abandoned guesthouse by the owner, Noel. While Clara takes on a job as a lady of the night who drains the blood from her clients, Eleanor has dreams of being a writer, chronicling her life as a vampire in pages that she usually scatters in the wind. It isn't long before they are discovered, both by the mortal people of the town and by The Brotherhood; an all-male vampire organisation that seek to find and kill Clara. Eleanor meets a boy called Frank, who she develops feelings for and spills the secrets of her world to, angering her mother who fears for their safety. As knowledge of their existence spreads further and further, they are forced to confront their past and the deadly secrets that come with it.

Continue: Byzantium Trailer

When The Lights Went Out Review


Very Good
Based on an outrageous true story, this is essentially Britain's own Amityville Horror, as a family haplessly moves into a house occupied by a noisy, terrifying ghost. The filmmakers create a strong freak-out atmosphere, jolting us out of our seats several times along the way, but some plot points ring false and some scenes feel a bit silly.

It's 1974 when Jenny and Len (Ashfield and Waddington) move into a new home.

They're delighted with the increase in space and the lovely Yorkshire setting, but their 17-year-old daughter Sally (Connor) is annoyed that her life has been disrupted. And the rolling blackouts don't help either, especially since the darkness seems to reveal something malevolent lurking in the shadows.

Continue reading: When The Lights Went Out Review

Late Night Shopping Review


Good
Oddly enough, there's little shopping at all in Late Night Shopping. How could there be? The four Brits whom the film resolves around all work at night -- so obviously they'd have to do their shopping during the day.

That little inconsistency is only the first of hundreds you'll find in this virtually unseen flick, which features some engaging characters and performances but blows it all with a script that alternates between illogical and just plain dumb.

Continue reading: Late Night Shopping Review

The War Zone Review


Weak
Incest. Treachery. Betrayal. Videotape.

No, I'm not talking about the new version of Hamlet. I'm talking about The War Zone, a 21st century Kitchen Sink drama helmed by Brit actor-who-should-stay-an-actor Tim Roth.

Continue reading: The War Zone Review

The Low Down Review


Weak
I like the slacker mentality, really I do. Nights of parties, days of sleeping them off, not a care in the world. The sad thing is that, with rare exception (namely Slacker), movies about the slacker mentality come off as if they too were made without a care in the world.

The Low Down is Exhibit A when it comes to this offense. Lazy, meandering, mopey, and flat, this is a cheap-looking film obsessed with showing off a hip image it doesn't actually have.

Continue reading: The Low Down Review

Shaun Of The Dead Review


Good
Shaun (Simon Pegg) is going nowhere in life. He's a 29-year-old sales manager at a London electronics store populated by teenage employees who don't respect him. His girlfriend Liz (Kate Ashfield), tired of her beau's adolescent slackerdom and penchant for wining and dining her at the unromantic Winchester Tavern, has unceremoniously dumped him. And his best friend and roommate Ed (Nick Frost) is a lazy slob who plays videogames all day long, doesn't pay rent, regularly impersonates the orangutan from Every Which Way But Loose, and offers beneficial break-up advice like, "You know what we should do tomorrow? Keep drinking." Shaun, unmotivated and irresponsible, spends his dead-end days like a zombie. That is, until real zombies start showing up in his back yard.

In Edgar Wright's Shaun of the Dead, zombie-smashing antics serve as backdrop for the maturation of couch potato Shaun, who learns to embrace accountability and responsibility during his journey to save Liz and his dear ol' mum (Penelope Wilton) from the hordes of walking corpses infesting metropolitan London. With a cricket bat in hand and wise-cracking Ed at his side, Shaun embarks on his daring rescue mission with annoyed nonchalance, and his general disgust at having to do something, anything, besides sitting slack-jawed in front of the television is the comedic lifeblood of Wright's tongue-in-cheek parody of zombie movie conventions and big-budget Hollywood moviemaking. Shooting for gut-busting humor instead of stomach-churning terror, the film is awash in absurdity. Shaun's general catatonic demeanor causes him to miss the initial warning signs of London's apocalyptic state of affairs, and, once he finally does grasp the situation's severity, his reluctant heroism is tinged with irritability at being inconvenienced. When it comes time to destroy the monsters, Shaun does so with a blasé attitude that makes his gallantry less a stirring act of self-realization than a fart-infused, brain-squashing goof-off.

Continue reading: Shaun Of The Dead Review

The Low Down Review


Weak

Frank (Adien Gillen) is British. He makes TV props for a living. He smokes a lot and drinks with his mates. He has that restless, what's-my-life-about feeling of late-20s malaise.

"The Low Down" is supposed to be a movie about how Frank eventually pulls himself together with the help of a good woman, an optimistic young real estate agent named Ruby (Kate Ashfield). But until he does pull himself together, which isn't until literally 30 seconds before the credits roll, the film's cast of arguably interesting people don't do a thing worth paying eight bucks to watch.

I hardly took any notes at the screening of this film because there just wasn't much to write about. Frank has trouble with the lashing-out of an artistically bored business partner pal. He half-heartedly looks for a condo until Ruby catches on that he just wants to see her and not so much the flats she shows him.

Continue reading: The Low Down Review

Kate Ashfield

Kate Ashfield Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Kate Ashfield Movies

Believe Movie Review

Believe Movie Review

With its heart in the right place, this charming British football drama overcomes a script...

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Nymphomaniac: Volume II Trailer

Joe is a fiercely determined 50-year-old woman whose sexual drive has taken over her entire...

Byzantium Movie Review

Byzantium Movie Review

Nearly 20 years after Interview With the Vampire, Neil Jordan returns to the genre to...

Byzantium Trailer

Byzantium Trailer

Clara and Eleanor are a mother and daughter, born two centuries ago as vampires and...

When the Lights Went Out Movie Review

When the Lights Went Out Movie Review

Based on an outrageous true story, this is essentially Britain's own Amityville Horror, as a...

The War Zone Movie Review

The War Zone Movie Review

Incest. Treachery. Betrayal. Videotape.No, I'm not talking about the new version of Hamlet....

The Low Down Movie Review

The Low Down Movie Review

I like the slacker mentality, really I do. Nights of parties, days of sleeping...

Shaun of the Dead Movie Review

Shaun of the Dead Movie Review

Shaun (Simon Pegg) is going nowhere in life. He's a 29-year-old sales manager at a...

The Low Down Movie Review

The Low Down Movie Review

Frank (Adien Gillen) is British. He makes TV props for a living. He smokes a...

Shaun Of The Dead Movie Review

Shaun Of The Dead Movie Review

A huge hit in England last spring and a shoe-in for instant cult-classic status, "Shaun...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.