Kane Hodder

Kane Hodder

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'Hatchet 3' premiere at the Egyptian Theatre

Kane Hodder - 'Hatchet 3' premiere at the Egyptian Theatre - Hollywood, CA, United States - Tuesday 11th June 2013

Frozen Review


OK
As far as claustrophobic, high-concept B-movie thrillers go, this is pretty entertaining, throwing out logic in lieu of rampant, grisly tension. It's also extremely well-shot, making the most from its limited setting and three-person cast.

Joe (Ashmore) isn't hugely thrilled that his best pal Dan (Zegers) has invited his girlfriend Parker (Bell) along for a day of skiing. But she comes in handy when they need to charm the chairlift operator (Ackerman) into giving them a free ride. On the other hand, on their last trip up the mountain the lift is switched off for the week, and they're stranded in the chair. With a storm rolling in. And wolves braying for blood beneath them.

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The world premiere of 'Hatchet II', as part of Frightfest 2010, held at the Empire, Leicester Square

Kane Hodder Thursday 26th August 2010 The world premiere of 'Hatchet II', as part of Frightfest 2010, held at the Empire, Leicester Square London, England

Kane Hodder

B.T.K. Review


Terrible
It's amazing how much mileage an average Hollywood Joe can get out of playing a fright film icon. Just ask Robert Englund, or Mr. Original Leatherface himself, Gunnar Hansen. Or how about Kane Hodder, for example. Asked to take over the role of Jason Voorhees when the Friday the 13th killer decided to draw some New Blood, the professional stuntman and stunt coordinator has parlayed said initial appearance into a big fat b-movie oeuvre, starring in everything from more 13th sequels to parts in The Devil's Rejects, 2001 Maniacs, and Hatchet.

But for Hodder, true leading man status has always been elusive, even within the genre context he is best known for. Of course, he must have hoped this would change with the all important turn as Dennis Rader in this fictionalized account of the B.T.K. killer's story. To his credit, he's the very best thing in this made-on-the-cheap thriller. Sadly, everything else around him is pretty much awful.

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Hatchet Review


Grim
Touted as the next big thing in horror by everyone from Kane Hodder to Dee Snider, Adam Green's Hatchet comes pre-packaged by the director himself as a return to "Old-School American Horror." What does he mean by "old-school?" The facts that the main dismemberer in Green's film is played by Hodder, the man behind Jason Vorhees, and that Freddy Kruger himself, Robert Englund, makes a cameo in the early minutes of the film give it some street cred in the crowded world of iconic horror (Friday the 13th, A Nightmare on Elm Street).

Green's agenda is to return the horror genre to a lean mixture of gore and humor, as well as reestablishing the notion of horror iconography. His icon is Victor Crowley, a double-decker-sized mutant hillbilly relegated to the swamps of New Orleans. As you might suspect, Victor finds himself in the mood for a festive homicide when a boatload of tourists on a haunted swamp tour get stuck near his burnt-out family shack. Soon enough, Victor begins tossing limbs and torsos every which way while impaling and mutilating any body that has the good fortune of staying in one piece. It becomes the charge of a vengeful girl (Tamara Feldman) and a nerdy so-and-so (Joel Moore) to escape Crowley's clutches, heartbeats intact.

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Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood Review


Grim
By this point in the Friday the 13th series, Jason has been definitively killed twice (in parts 4 and 6), and now it's evident that he can't really be offed for more than a year or two until someone scrapes together the budget for another movie. Chained at the bottom of Crystal Lake in #6, The New Blood brings in new teens for the slaughter and revives Jason, courtesy of a psychic blonde who pops him up out of the water thanks to her telekenetic powers. Way to go, slick. Once he's loose again, it's pretty much business as usual, though notably the blonde commands Jason's mask to pop off, showing us his face for the first time since part 3, where he kinda looked like Chunk from The Goonies.

Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday Review


Weak
The funny thing about the Friday the 13th movies is how much energy they expend just to run in place. This series sets the standard for low horror-movie learning curves - not just in the actions of characters onscreen, but in the decisions of the filmmakers; the fact that it took four movies before anyone thought up Bride of Chucky, for example, has its roots in the endless returns to Camp Crystal Lake.

Take Jason Goes to Hell, for example, the ninth film in the series. It opens with a satisfying riff on the Friday status quo: A lone woman rattles around an abandoned cabin, draws a bath, puts on a towel, and gets chased by hulking uber-slasher Jason Voorhees... into some open brush, at which point she executes a diving roll and Jason is beset by a hail of special ops bullets, and then blown to hilarious bits by what we can only assume to be Monty Python's Holy Hand Grenade.

Continue reading: Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday Review

Darkwolf Review


Unbearable
Filmmakers have tried to outdo The Howling and An American Werewolf in London ever since the films reestablished the werewolf genre 20 years ago. While a few movies have come close (Fright Night, for instance), they have yet to match the thrills and chills of those earlier films. As we patiently await the next werewolf classic, DarkWolf prowls into the race. Could this be the movie that redefines the werewolf genre forever?

Nope. Not even close. If Bad Moon is at the bottom of the barrel, DarkWolf is buried far, far beneath. Although it appeals to its target audience of horny teenagers and sex-deprived old men by featuring plenty of blood and boobs, the movie completely lacks everything else.

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Boogeymen Review


OK
Just when you think there are no new ideas in Hollywood comes a DVD like Boogeymen, which shakes up your expectations of the movies. With the promise of giving you "the greatest hits of horror," Boogeymen is a compilation of scenes from 17 horror movies, ostensibly the best-known bits of the movies' "boogeymen" doing their dirtiest work.

Some of these boogeymen are the real deal -- Leatherface (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) at the end of the film, Freddy Krueger (A Nightmare on Elm Street) in his finest hour, Jason (Friday the 13th) chasing a towel-wrapped co-ed, Pinhead (Hellraiser) ripping apart some dude. These are memorable horror baddies who haunted us during our youth. Then there are scenes from Wishmaster, Leprechaun, The Guardian, and even The Dentist -- not only is it not scary, it's silly and insulting to the other villains (like Psycho's Norman Bates) in the lineup. The Puppetmaster? And The Ugly? I've never even heard of The Ugly.

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Jason X Review


Unbearable
What would happen if you applied the old adage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" to something that actually was broke. Would it miraculously fix itself? Apparently not, as Jason X - the latest installment in the long-running Friday the 13th series - hauls out once again all of the ridiculous elements that once decimated the franchise's credibility, only to produce an equally horrible sequel.

For starters, the film drops its descriptive Friday the 13th moniker, and in the process, forgets its roots. Ignoring the fact that hockey mask-sporting Jason Voorhees had his Final Chapter in 1984 or was banished to hell in 1993's The Final Friday, the new Jason X opens with the ruthless fiend (Kane Hodder) awaiting cryogenic treatment at the Crystal Lake Research Facility. Scientists interested in exploring Jason's ability to rapidly regenerate cell tissue delay the deep freeze just long enough for Voorhees to pull a Harry Houdini, though, and Jason promptly slaughters the entire egg-headed bunch. Take that, science! Only gorgeous Dr. Rowan (Lexa Doig) is spared, and while she's able to trap Jason in a cryogenic chamber, a leak in the equipment freezes her in the process. Ah, cryogenics - just another link in the long chain of similarities between Jason and entertainment czar Walt Disney. But I digress.

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Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan Review


Unbearable
Utterly appalling, as Jason finds himself a stowaway on a cruise ship bound for New York (contrary to the popular description, he isn't dragged there), after being awakened by an electric shock to his watery grave. Then he, well, takes Manhattan -- and that means leather-clad gang members and shag-haired rockers, to wholly unfunny effect. Most of the film is spent on the ship, however. Watch for Kelly Hu in her first motion picture appearance. (She gets a garden-variety strangling.)

Jason X Review


Terrible

How someone could make a genuinely boring slasher flick about "Friday the 13th's" Jason Voorhees in outer space is beyond me. Stupid, sure. Badly acted? I'd expect nothing less. Not scary? Well, let's face it: none of the "Friday the 13th" movies have ever been scary. But boring?

Even though I've never been entertained by a single film in this franchise about an indestructible maniac in a hockey mask who guts horny teenagers, I was actually looking forward to this installment. I figured the producers were going for camp value this time -- and in fact, I think that might have been what they were doing. I mean, Jason thaws out of a cryogenic freeze in 2455 and starts cutting up casting couch bimbos on a space ship. If that isn't meant to be the series' most intentionally ridiculous extreme, I don't know what is.

And what about that cast of cardboard-pretty 20-somethings, who are probably already back to serving coffee at Starbucks since this movie was made two years ago? They're so uniformly and painfully untalented that you have to wonder if the people with the worst auditions were given parts in the movie on purpose.

Continue reading: Jason X Review

Daredevil Review


Grim

An unremarkably routine superhero movie based on the cult-favorite comic book about a satanically-costumed blind vigilante, "Daredevil" plays like a C-grade grad project for a night school course called Superhero Filmmaking 101.

Faithful to his inspiration -- the era of "Daredevil" issues written by "Batman" revitalizer Frank Miller and comic-crazy film director Kevin Smith -- in several important details, writer-director Mark Steven Johnson's one stroke of true genius comes in the pulses of fluid, misty, ghostly imagery he uses to depict the sightless crime fighter's enhanced ability to "see" through sound waves and smells.

But most of the picture apes its action style -- and many whole fight scenes -- from last year's "Spider-Man." It has the same ineffectual opening voice-over, the same unconvincingly CGI-assisted rooftop leaping and building-swinging (Daredevil uses a grappling-hook-modified walking cane instead of spider-webbing) and its hero has the same slow-mo back-flip method of dodging weapons thrown by villains.

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