Justin Bieber has apologised after he posed at a controversial Japanese site.

The 'Baby' hitmaker visited the Yasakuni shrine, which is located in the country's capital Tokyo and honours those who died in conflicts spanning from the Boshin War of 1868 to the end of World War II, earlier this week, but insists he did so unaware of what the monument stood for.

He wrote the message ''Thank you for your blessings,'' alongside an image of himself at the site on Twitter - a post which has since been removed.

This caused outrage since countries including China, South Korea, and Taiwan see the site as being unapologetic about the events of World War II and so Justin has reached out to fans.

He wrote: ''While in Japan I asked my driver to pull over for which I saw a beautiful shrine. I was mislead to think the shrines were only a place of prayer. To anyone I have offended I am extremely sorry. I love you China and I love you Japan.''

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang, is hoping the incident has helped Justin understand the importance of the historical relations between Chinese and Japanese.

He told the South China Morning Post newspaper: ''I don't know the political stance of this Canadian singer, but China's view on Japanese leaders visiting the Yasukuni Shrine is clear and consistent.

''I hope this singer can learn more about the history of Japanese militarism, and the wrongful historical and militaristic views promoted by the shrine after the visit.''

Justin previously caused outrage when for comments made during his visit to the Anne Frank Museum in Amsterdam and was arrested for driving under the influence in January.