Julie Kavner

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Katherine Borowitz, Ari Graynor, Julie Kavner, Lisa Emery and Marlo Thomas - Katherine Borowitz, Allen Lewis Rickman, Max Gordon Moore, Marlo Thomas, Lisa Emery, Patricia O'Connell, Ari Graynor and Julie Kavner New York City, USA - Opening night of the Broadway production of 'Relatively Speaking' at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre - Curtain Call Thursday 20th October 2011

Katherine Borowitz, Ari Graynor, Julie Kavner, Lisa Emery and Marlo Thomas
Steve Guttenberg, Katherine Borowitz, Lisa Emery and Marlo Thomas
Grant Shaud, Caroline Aaron, Katherine Borowitz, Lisa Emery, Marlo Thomas and Steve Guttenberg
Katherine Borowitz, Ari Graynor, Julie Kavner, Lisa Emery and Marlo Thomas
Danny Hoch, Caroline Aaron, Grant Shaud, Katherine Borowitz and Steve Guttenberg

The Simpsons: Season Ten Review


Very Good
By the end of the 1990s The Simpsons, the former enfant terrible of Rupert Murdoch's once upstart Fox Network, was well into its mature middle period of cultural acceptance. Earlier seasons (the first full episode aired back in December 1989) had seen a lot of attention paid to Bart's supposedly dangerous antisocial tendencies. But throughout the 1990s, the show had honed its satire and firmed up its roster of stellar voice actors, turning what had been seen first as the animated equivalent of Married With Children into something of a national institution. Seasons 8 and 9 had provided some of the show's greatest episodes, like "Homer's Enemy" (a devastating stab at American lassitude featuring Homer's nemesis Frank Grimes) and "Lisa the Skeptic" (where consumerism and religion get a similarly brutal treatment).

The 23 episodes of Season 10, broadcast between August 1998 and May 1999, reveal a show securely positioned both as money-making endeavor for Fox and well-regarded repository for smarty-pants satire. The show's writers, one of TV's greatest collections of comic minds since the stellar days of Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, know exactly what notes to hit, and they hit them over and over again; meaning, in short: lots of Homer being an unthinking idiot. Homer could save Grandpa's life with a kidney transplant, but he's too scared of the operation and keeps running away, ala the climax of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Homer becomes a bodyguard. And so on. But all this attention also means that the writers are constantly feeding Homer the best lines ("Are you sure this is a sci-fi convention? It's full of nerds."), though Bart gets plenty of one-liners as well ("Dad, you make a great hippie; you're lazy and self-righteous!").

Continue reading: The Simpsons: Season Ten Review

The Simpsons Movie Review


Excellent
Best. Animated. Movie. Ever?

Not quite, Comic Book Guy, but the long-gestating and highly anticipated The Simpsons Movie does deliver a raucous feature-length venture that should satisfy faithful fans while still entertaining audience members who don't know Homer J. Simpson from a hole in the wall. By stretching a formula normally applied to a 22-minute episode, Simpsons lobs comically sacrilegious spitballs at an environmentally sensitive storyline that justifies its big-screen treatment. The humor stays irreverent without making the still-running sitcom irrelevant.

Continue reading: The Simpsons Movie Review

Julie Kavner - Julie Kavner - voice of Marge Simpson Tuesday 24th July 2007 at Mann Village Theater Westwood, California

Julie Kavner
Julie Kavner

Julie Kavner - Julie Kavner, voice of Marge Simpson Tuesday 24th July 2007 at Mann Village Theater Westwood, California

Julie Kavner

Julie Kavner - Tuesday 24th July 2007 at Mann Village Theater Westwood, California

Julie Kavner
Julie Kavner

Click Review


Bad
It seems only fitting that Adam Sandler, who has made a career of being the quintessential every-guy, would pilot a movie about the greatest invention for men -- the remote control. But Click isn't about the eternal struggle for who controls the all powerful remote. Instead, it's about all of the trouble Sandler can cause with this seemingly uncomplicated little device.

Sandler plays Michael, a workaholic architect who spends more time satisfying the whims of his demanding boss (David Hasselhoff) than he does with his family. Michael cancels camping trips with his kids and rushes (foolishly) through love-making sessions with his wife Donna (Kate Beckinsale) just so he can inch closer to that partnership he covets. Michael is out of control and out of the loop on everything going on at home. He can't even distinguish his television remote from the one that controls his garage.

Continue reading: Click Review

Deconstructing Harry Review


Very Good
The Wood-man cometh, and he goes for broke this time.

Pretty much taking pot-shots at everyone he's ever known, every establishment he can think of, every vice there is, and--mostly--himself... that's your basic summary of Deconstructing Harry. Allen is vulgar and crass, wholly unlikeable... but hysterical. Maybe the funniest part of the film is the cast of stars he's lined up, all of whom do nothing but get spit upon the whole time! Suckers! (The movie is told half in reality, half as visualizations of writer Harry Block's (Allen) stories, thus, the large cast.)

Continue reading: Deconstructing Harry Review

Judy Berlin Review


Good
Judy Berlin has the unmistakable characteristics of a Woody Allen film (though it's not one). Its cerebral humor, rash characters, and ensemble cast are gelled with a very Allenesque theme: that life has simply passed by the small, predominantly Jewish community of Babylon, Long Island. First time director Eric Mendelsohn, who reportedly worked with Allen on several films, shoots in black and white, and effectively paints a dreary reality for the people of the small suburb.

As the story goes, it is the second day of school and the fall is in full swing. David Gold (Aaron Harnick) has returned to his parent's home after spending time working in the film business in California. He runs into old high school classmate Judy Berlin (Edie Falco - from HBO's Oz and The Sopranos), an outspoken yet dimwitted aspiring actress on her way to Hollywood that very evening. The story follows their respective families as Judy and David spend the day reminiscing while a solar eclipse darkens the town.

Continue reading: Judy Berlin Review

Radio Days Review


Excellent
In this lighter-than-air outing from Woody Allen, he recalls his fondness for the radio as a child, an appliance that was "always on" in his home as a kid. Most of my generation could write a Television Days, of course, but the magic of radio would vanish into infomercials, talk shows, and awful sitcoms... it just wouldn't carry the same punch.

The film is a series of vignettes, clearly drawn from Allen's days as a youngster, and only tangentially interrelated. It's almost overly upbeat -- to the point where you wish Woody would get a little more miserable from time to time.

Continue reading: Radio Days Review

Forget Paris Review


Very Good
It's a shame that so many romantic comedies are in current release, because inevitably, something good is going to be overlooked due to the cinematic glut of warm fuzzies. As the third of its type in about as many weeks, Forget Paris is one of the strongest entries of the genre.

Billy Crystal directs and stars in this Baby Boomer romantic fable about a pair of star-crossed lovers (Crystal, as Mickey, and Debra Winger, as Ellen) who can't seem to get their relationship right. Going through a dozen iterations of "boy meets girl, boy loses girl," the couple's story is told through a narrative from their friends over dinner.

Continue reading: Forget Paris Review

Judy Berlin Review


OK

A sardonic yet adoring, antic allegory about a menagerie of neurotic Long Island oddballs following and/or abandoning their dreams, "Judy Berlin" is a strange little film that got left behind like a red-headed step child at last year's Sundance Film Festival.

Its creator Eric Mendelsohn won Best Director in Park City, but went home without a distribution deal -- which is the undeclared movie meat market's unspoken parting gift for award winners.

Then along came indie house Shooting Gallery, which has made this movie the flagship release for a touring series of six pictures the distributor feels went unfairly unnoticed during their festival tours.

Continue reading: Judy Berlin Review

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Julie Kavner Movies

The Simpsons Movie Movie Review

The Simpsons Movie Movie Review

Best. Animated. Movie. Ever? Not quite, Comic Book Guy, but the long-gestating and highly anticipated...

Click Movie Review

Click Movie Review

It seems only fitting that Adam Sandler, who has made a career of being the...

Deconstructing Harry Movie Review

Deconstructing Harry Movie Review

The Wood-man cometh, and he goes for broke this time.Pretty much taking pot-shots at everyone...

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Judy Berlin Movie Review

Judy Berlin Movie Review

A sardonic yet adoring, antic allegory about a menagerie of neurotic Long Island oddballs following...

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