Julie Graham

Julie Graham

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Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards 2014 - Arrivals

Julie Graham - Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards 2014 at the Grosvenor Hotel London - Arrivals at Grosvenor Hotel - London, United Kingdom - Friday 24th October 2014

Julie Graham and Rachael Stirling
Julie Graham and Rachael Stirling
Julie Graham

Celebrities at the ITV studios

Julie Graham - Celebrities outside the ITV studios. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 11th March 2014

Julie Graham

Celebrities at the ITV studios

Julie Graham - Julie Graham outside ITV Studios - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th March 2014

Julie Graham
Julie Graham
Julie Graham
Julie Graham
Julie Graham

2013 British Academy Scotland Awards - Arrivals

Julie Graham - 2013 British Academy Scotland Awards held at the Radisson Blu Hotel - Arrivals - United Kingdom - Sunday 17th November 2013

Julie Graham

Tower Block Review


OK

Gritty and claustrophobic, this British horror-thriller holds our interest with well-played characters rather than the wobbly plotting. It's a clever idea for low-budget suspense, because it essentially has just one set. And the premise is unnerving even if we instantly realise its implausibility. Still, once everything is set in motion, the story has no where to go, trapped like the characters themselves on the top floor of a condemned London apartment building.

Aside from the residents of the top floor of this block, everyone else has already been relocated. And after a violent murder in the corridor, these people are ready to get out too. Then one morning sniper fire starts picking them off one by one through the windows. Their phones and internet are down, every way out is blocked, and they have to work out a plan of action. Intriguingly, it's a young woman, Becky (Smith), who rises as the group's leader, tenaciously refusing to give up. Other residents include a local thug (O'Connell), a depressed alcoholic (Tovey), a couple of pensioners (Brown and Baker), a tense mum (Graham) and her teen son (McEntire), and two drug dealers (Elouhabi and Robinson).

As we begin to understand what's happening, there are some massive lapses in logic that continually niggle. The sniper is shooting from one side of the building, so presumably the flats on the other side are safe and undisturbed, and yet everyone remains huddled in the hallway. The building's front door is blocked, but they ignore the fire exit. And how exactly do you block a mobile phone signal at the top of a tall tower in a massive city? Fortunately, the actors make us believe that they aren't worried by these gaping plot holes. Smith is especially good as the feisty Becky, a refreshingly complex female hero who doesn't have to be rescued by the boys. O'Connell adds a few layers to his annoying character, and Tovey is as likeable as ever.

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Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Terrible
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Terrible
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.

Preaching to the Perverted Review


Weak
When you wrap your DVD in a faux vinyl S&M mask, you're making a statement. In the case of Preaching to the Perverted, that statement is, "Bondage is fun!"

This silly little comedy out of the UK offers a simple premise sent against a presumably scandalous backdrop: the world of fetish/S&M clubs. It's all fun and games until Johnny Law comes sniffing around, trying to figure out who's behind the clubs (which meet in secret) and how to prosecute them for, er, something. The government's priggishness seems to revolve around problems with shock treatment being practiced on the slave types. Solution: Hire a young "computer whiz" (in this film, that means a guy who knows how to use a chat room) to "infiltrate" the bondage world and gather evidence against them.

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Bedrooms & Hallways Review


OK

Gay guys whining about their complicated sex lives may be wearing a bit thin as a staple for alternative romantic comedies, but "Bedrooms and Hallways" gives this retread genre a good, swift kick in the pants.

A light, soap-operatic satire of shifting sexual orientation from Rose Troche, the director of "Go Fish," this Brit import has been a buzz flick at Gay and Lesbian film festivals all year long for its steady supply of laughs, its exploration of sexual identity and its somewhat surprising last act.

Kevin McKidd ("Trainspotting") stars as Leo, a reserved, romantically frustrated 30-year-old whose surprise birthday party, which opens the film, quickly becomes an fusion of all the entanglements in his life.

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Julie Graham

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