Julia Ormond

Julia Ormond

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Los Angeles Premiere of FOOD CHAINS

Julia Ormond and Daniel Di Tomasso - Shots from the red carpet ahead of the premiere of 'Food Chains' which was held at the Los Angeles Theater Center in Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 13th November 2014

Julia Ormond and Daniel Di Tomasso
Julia Ormond and Daniel Di Tomasso
Julia Ormond and Daniel Di Tomasso

Los Angeles Premiere of FOOD CHAINS

Julia Ormond and Madchen Amick - Los Angeles Premiere of FOOD CHAINS at Los Angeles Theatre Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 13th November 2014

Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond

San Diego Comic-Con International - Day 1

Julia Ormond and Madchen Amick - San Diego Comic-Con International - 'Witches Of East End' Season 2 premiere at The Tipsy Crow - San Diego, California, United States - Thursday 24th July 2014

Daniel Ditomasso, Rachel Boston, Julia Ormond, Jenna Dewan-Tatum, Madchen Amick and Eric Winter

The East Review


Good

Despite a bunch of cold characters and a deeply contrived plot, this film is so infused with hot topicality that we are held in its grip all the way through. The issue is corporate irresponsibility and grass-roots activism, both of which feel ripped straight from the headlines to give the movie an edgy, almost documentary urgency. On the other hand, it's nearly impossible to get involved in the story's inter-personal dramas.

Director Batmanglij is reteaming with Sound of My Voice actress-cowriter Marling, who this time plays Jane, a corporate-security spy assigned by her shark-like boss (Clarkson) to infiltrate the eco-terrorism group The East. The goal is to prevent them from attacking any of her clients. It takes Jane awhile to worm her way into the anarchists' inner sanctum, where she immediately finds an affinity with leader Benji (Skarsgard), medically trained Doc (Kebbell) and flamboyant Luca (Fernandez). It takes longer to warm to the prickly Izzy (Page), but eventually Jane finds herself part of the core team, invited to participate in a series of jams in which The East gives company bosses a taste of their own toxic medicine.

In the cast of a pharmaceutical giant, this is quite literally the case: they infect the executive (Ormond) with the dangerous drug she's selling to the developing world. And the gang also stages assaults on oil companies in ways that are eerily easy for us to identify with, because the activists are making an important point. Indeed, we never really doubt where the filmmakers' sympathies lie: even if their actions are illegal and rather nasty, these "terrorists" are the good guys. At least this moral complexity gives the film a brainy kick.

Continue reading: The East Review

HBO's Annual Emmy Awards Post Awards Reception at the Pacific Design Center

Julia Ormond Saturday 12th April 2008 HBO's Annual Emmy Awards Post Awards Reception at the Pacific Design Center

Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond
Julia Ormond

64th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals

Julia Ormond Sunday 23rd September 2012 64th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals

My Week With Marilyn Review


Good
Based on Colin Clark's memoirs, this film sometimes feels a bit too warm and nostalgic for its own good. But the performances are strong, and it's packed with terrific moments.

At age 23, Colin (Redmayne) is struggling to break into the movie business, camping out at the production offices of Laurence Olivier (Branagh), who is just about to start filming the 1957 comedy The Prince and the Showgirl with Marilyn Monroe (Williams). While Marilyn's diva behaviour and strict acting coach (Wanamaker) enrage Laurence, he can't deny that when she gets it right, she's magic. Meanwhile, Colin is assigned to help Marilyn make it through the shoot. And of course he can't help falling for her.

Continue reading: My Week With Marilyn Review

My Week With Marilyn Trailer


Colin Clark is an aspiring film maker and his first job upon leaving university is the role of assistant on a new film, called The Prince and The Showgirl. It stars a young Laurence Olivier and Marilyn Monroe, the blonde bombshell who shocks with her implications that she sleeps in the nude.

Continue: My Week With Marilyn Trailer

Albatross Review


OK
Beautifully filmed and acted, but lacking a central perspective, this gentle comedy-drama has some nice points to make about freeing ourselves from the things in the past that weigh us down (the hint is in the title). But the lively characters would have been more involving with some focus to the narrative.

Jonathan and Joa (Koch and Ormond) constantly bicker as they run their seaside B&B, mainly because they have failed careers as an author and actress, respectively. Meanwhile, daughter Beth (Jones) is preparing for her Oxford entrance interview. Enter a new cleaner, 17-year-old Emilia (Brown Findlay), who befriends Beth and shows her that there's more to life than studying. But Emilia's relentless flirting also distracts Jonathan from his writing. And as the potential for trouble rises, everyone will need to realise that who they are has nothing to do with their pasts.

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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Review


Essential
Every great filmmaker is allowed one bad film. For David Fincher, his first was his worst.

An intelligent director, Fincher cut his teeth on television commercials and music videos before making his feature debut in 1992 with a forgettable and regrettable installment in the Alien franchise. It was all uphill from there. Fincher's next five films arguably are modern classics, each impressively different from its immediate predecessor. Gen X fanboys idolize him for the basement-dwelling aggressions of Fight Club. The director brought flash -- and a needed backbone -- to pulp thrillers like The Game and Panic Room. And cineastes found plenty to appreciate in the meticulous musings of Fincher's cold-case police procedural, Zodiac.

Continue reading: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Review

Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Review


Grim
Quick -- name three subjects you think would result in a surefire family film hit. If you said The Great Depression, hobo culture, and the social pariah realities of both, you are clearly one of the suits that saw fit to greenlight Kit Kittredge: An American Girl. Granted, this starring vehicle for Little Miss Sunshine's Abigail Breslin, does fit her perky Oscar-nominated spunk to a T. But the dour backdrop of America in the throes of a bleak fiscal future, along with the resulting rampant homelessness, is enough to give modern audiences some substantial mortgage crisis déjà-vu.

When her dad (Chris O'Donnell) loses his car dealership and heads off to Chicago to look for work, Cincinnati's own Kit Kittredge (Breslin) helps her mother (Julia Ormond) turn the family home into a boarding house. There, they take in several guests, including the snooty Mrs. Howard (Glenne Hedley) and her son Sterling (Zach Mills), wacky mobile librarian Miss Bonds (Joan Cusack), doe-eyed dance instructor Miss Dooley (Jane Krakowski), and struggling magician Mr. Berk (Stanley Tucci). When a string of crimes is linked to a rise in the transient population, Kit puts on her wannabe-reporter's hat and investigates. Her goal: to become the youngest journalist on the city paper and discover the truth of what's going on.

Continue reading: Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Review

I Know Who Killed Me Review


Grim
I know what you're thinking, and the answer is yes, I Know You Killed Me has a titular line of dialogue. In the fine tradition of exploitation movies, it has to -- the lead character has to turn to someone and say that enticingly ridiculous statement. In that sense, this film delivers.

The aforementioned tradition, though, doesn't say anything about that titular line actually making any sense. I wouldn't want to give away plot details to I Know Who Killed Me that might spoil any plans to Netflix and heckle it with friends (or to stumble across it on cable and heckle it alone), but suffice it to say that this line is delivered with utter seriousness by someone who is in no way dead, even by the movie's own convoluted stretches of imagination (granted, a limited one in this case).

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Legends of the Fall Review


Weak
Legends of the Fall is a sprawling epic about three brothers, their father, and the woman who weaves among all of them. The film is primarily focused with the middle brother, played by Brad Pitt. Pitt is the only redeeming feature of the film; Pitt's talents have gone relatively unnoticed since his debut in Thelma and Louise in 1991, and Legends should give him the notice he deserves.

The rest of the cast is not so lucky. Henry Thomas (the kid from E.T.) still looks like he did ten years ago, Aidan Quinn is out of his league, Julia Ormond spends the majority of the film in tears, and even Anthony Hopkins has a dismal role, half of which he plays as a stroke victim.

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The Prime Gig Review


Good
Something's rotten in The Prime Gig, but damned if you can put your finger on it. Director Gregory Mosher and his team have done their homework in crafting a suspenseful con-artist thriller by keeping you guessing about just who's getting conned.

Is it Vince Vaughn's Penny, a distrusting telemarketer with questionable morals? Or is it Ed Harris's Kelly Grant, a kingpin of telephone sales who recruits Penny to help him sell $2.5 million worth of investment shares in a gold mine? Or something else altogether? Penny takes this "prime gig," mainly because it gets him closer to Kelly's girlfriend (Julia Ormand), which, combined with his inability to sell anything on the floor, starts to land him in hotter and hotter water. Is any of this legit? Who's conning who? The Prime Gig takes its sweet time in getting to the answer, but it's definitely a worthwhile trip to take.

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Animal Farm (1999) Review


Good
The dark side of Babe. Impressive attempt at recreating Orwell's classic book for TV, but it's lacking a few components, and has a really abrupt and unfulfilling ending. Keeps your attention for the full two hours, though, and worth a look, especially for Orwell fans who don't mind a little bastardization. Check out also the reissued 1954 version of the film.
Julia Ormond

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