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God's Pocket Review


OK

Despite a strong sense of the characters and the setting, this film struggles to engage viewers with its downbeat story about how tough life is. Even though the performances are powerful enough to hold the attention, the film feels like it drifts aimlessly along, never coming into focus in a meaningful way. And since everything is right on the surface, there isn't much subtext to help the events resonate with the audience.

In the God's Pocket neighbourhood in 1980s Philadelphia, everyone knows everything about each others' lives. Mickey (Philip Seymour Hoffman) works as a driver delivering meat, but spends just as much time planning small-time scams with his pal Arthur (John Turturro). Then his life is thrown out of balance when his hothead stepson Leon (Caleb Landry Jones) dies in what is suspiciously described as a workplace accident. Mickey's wife Jeanie (Christina Hendricks) struggles to cope with her son's death, so Mickey is easily pressured by the local mortician (Eddie Marsan) into buying a funeral he can't afford. To make some extra cash, he plans a heist with Arthur and their careless pal Sal (Domenick Lombardozzi), which predictably goes awry. Meanwhile, a famed local journalist (Richard Jenkins) starts looking into Leon's death.

It's not like the film is low on plot: there are plenty of story strands to push each character further into their own personal desperation. And the tightly knit setting provides an intriguing counterpoint as everyone's dirty laundry is aired for all to see, which pushes their true emotions even further underground. This lets the actors deliver riveting performances, even as they're all beaten down to mere husks of humanity. In one of his final roles, Hoffman is terrific as a guy for whom everything goes relentlessly wrong. Hendricks is pretty wrenching as the rather drippy Jeanie, whose interaction with Jenkins is both warm and depressing. Thankfully, Turturro and Marsan provide a spark of energy, as does Joyce Van Patten in a scene-stealing role as Arthur's gun-crazy aunt.

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Meet And Greet With Cast Of The Playwrights Horizons Production Of The Great God Pan', Held At The PH Rehearsal Studio.

Peter Friedman, Erin Wilhelmi, Sarah Goldberg, Joyce Van Patten, Amy Herzog, Carolyn Cantor, Jeremy Strong, Keith Nobbs and Becky Ann Baker - Peter Friedman, Erin Wilhelmi, Sarah Goldberg, Joyce Van Patten, Amy Herzog, Carolyn Cantor, Jeremy Strong, Keith Nobbs and Becky Ann Baker Tuesday 23rd October 2012 Meet and greet with cast of the Playwrights Horizons production of The Great God Pan', held at the PH rehearsal studio.

Peter Friedman, Erin Wilhelmi, Sarah Goldberg, Joyce Van Patten, Amy Herzog, Carolyn Cantor, Jeremy Strong, Keith Nobbs and Becky Ann Baker
Peter Friedman and Joyce Van Patten
Becky Ann Baker, Jeremy Strong and Peter Friedman
Peter Friedman, Joyce Van Patten and Jeremy Strong
Becky Ann Baker and Peter Friedman
Becky Ann Baker and Peter Friedman

This Must Be The Place Trailer


Cheyenne is a soft-spoken, retired rockstar still wearing make-up and hairspray whilst living in Dublin and has been estranged from his Jewish father for 30 years. When he discovers that his father is dying in New York, he is determined to set out to put things right with him, but his journey is delayed by Cheyenne's aversion to flying; when he finally makes his way over, he is too late to see his father alive for the final time. He learns that his father was a victim of persecution in Auschwitz during the Holocaust of World War II and that he was once made to suffer public humiliation by the Nazi officer Aloise Muller. In a last bid to make peace with his father, Cheyenne sets out to kill Muller (who is currently hiding out in the States) whilst meeting several people along the way, including members of Muller's family. When he is finally led to Muller, he finds himself confronted with a difficult decision as he listens to his story and, eventually, he manages to mark out a new chapter in his retired life.

Continue: This Must Be The Place Trailer

This Must Be The Place Review


Good
Italian filmmaker Sorrentino creates a Jim Jarmusch-style odyssey from Ireland to America and back. Witty filmmaking and Penn's quirky performance keep it watchable, even though the story and themes are vague and elusive.

Cheyenne (Penn) is a former goth-rocker living in Dublin with his sparky firefighter wife Jane (McDormand). He's trying to hook his young friend Mary (Hewson) up with a shy waiter (Keeley), and he spends hours sitting with Mary's mother (Fouere) waiting for her missing son to come home. When his father falls ill, Cheyenne travels to New York for the funeral and then takes on his father's quest to find the Nazi who terrorised him at Auschwitz. This involves a cross-country road trip, during which Cheyenne comes to peace with himself without even realising it.

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The 25th Annual Broadway Flea Market And Grand Auction To Benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS In Times Square.

Joyce Van Patten and Times Square Sunday 25th September 2011 The 25th Annual Broadway Flea Market and Grand Auction to benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS in Times Square. New York City, USA

Joyce Van Patten and Times Square

Meet And Greet With The Cast Of The Upcoming Broadway Production Of 'The People In The Picture' At The Roundabout Rehearsal Space

Nicole Parker, Donna Murphy and Joyce Van Patten - Hal Robinson, Alexander Gemignani, Nicole Parker, Donna Murphy, Chip Zien, Lewis J. Stadlen, Rachel Resheff, Joyce Van Patten and Christopher Innvar New York City, USA - meet and greet with the cast of the upcoming Broadway production of 'The People in the Picture' at the Roundabout Rehearsal Space Friday 18th March 2011

Nicole Parker, Donna Murphy and Joyce Van Patten
Nicole Parker and Donna Murphy

Grown Ups Review


Grim
Why is it that comedies about middle-aged men regressing to their childhood so rarely, if ever, work? Not much more than an in-joke between the actors, this film is amiable but never funny. And despite some hackneyed moralising, it has nothing to say.

Five school buddies return home 30 years later for their beloved coach's funeral. Lenny (Sandler) is now a high-powered Beverly Hills agent married to a hot fashionista (Hayek). Eric (James) is an average guy with a lively wife (Bello) and unruly kids. Kurt (Rock) is a frazzled househusband married to a high-powered shrew (Rudolph). Marcus (Spade) is still the same lothario. And Rob (Schneider) is an overly emotional goofball with a much-older wife (Van Patten). Altogether, they head to a lake house for a week of wacky antics and shallow soul-searching.

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I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! Review


Grim
Peter Sellers made a lot of good movies, and history has been kind enough to purge the memory of the bad ones from our collective minds. The painfully titled I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! is one of those bad ones, the kind I'd now -- having just sat through it -- would prefer to forget altogether.

The setup is straight out of a '60s sitcom: Harold Fine (Sellers) is a stuffy lawyer. He re-encounters his dippy hippie brother Herbie (David Arkin) to take him to a funeral, and is immediately disgusted by his free-living ways. But when Herbie's pal Nancy (Leigh Taylor-Young) concocts a batch of pot brownies, Harold suddenly goes nuts for the hippie life. He turns his apartment into a love shrine, where he and Nancy can, well, eat a lot of pot brownies. Will he tire of this in the end and go back to his wife-to-be (whom he left at the altar to head off with Nancy)? Who cares?

Continue reading: I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! Review

Monkey Shines Review


Grim
Talk about having a monkey on your back. This is pretty hideous, standard horror fare, with a genetically-enhanced monkey caring for a quadrapelegic. This is about as bad as horror gets (and at 1:54 in length, it's as long as it gets, too), but it does feature the only known man-bites-monkey-to-death scene on film that I can remember.

The Falcon And The Snowman Review


Excellent
Underseen (and true) spy drama set in the early 1970s, The Falcon and the Snowman tells the perplexing tale of Christopher Boyce (Hutton), a low-level document controller who filtered reams of material to the Soviet Union. His mistake? Using his coked-up drug pusher buddy (Penn) as his bagman. As Penn's character falls apart, so does the plan. And in a way, so does the film. While most of Falcon is great, some of it drags and doesn't make sense. Still, you do get to hear a bit about Boyce's motivation: His conscience, which told him to expose the CIA for some of its more nefarious and off-topic activities. A good companion piece to better-known thrillers of the era like All the President's Men.
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