Joshua Malina

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26th Annual Time For Heroes Family Festival - Arrivals

Joshua Malina - The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation 26th Annual Time For Heroes Family Festival - Arrivals at Smashbox Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th October 2015

Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina

ABC's TGIT Premiere Event

Joshua Malina - ABC's TGIT premiere event - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 26th September 2015

Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina

The Paley Center For Media Presents The Cast Of Scandal

The Cast of Scandal, L to R, Scott Foley, Portia De Rossi, Darby Stanchfield, Guillermo Diaz, Joe Morton, Joshua Malina, Jeff Perry, Bellamy Young, Tony Goldwyn and Kerry Washington - The Paley Center for Media presents the cast of Scandal - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 14th May 2015

The Cast Of Scandal, L To R, Scott Foley, Portia De Rossi, Darby Stanchfield, Guillermo Diaz, Joe Morton, Joshua Malina, Jeff Perry, Bellamy Young, Tony Goldwyn and Kerry Washington
Scott Foley

Entertainment Weekly And PEOPLE Party

Scott Foley and Joshua Malina - Entertainment Weekly And PEOPLE Celebrate The New York Upfronts - Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Scott Foley and Joshua Malina
Scott Foley
Scott Foley

"Scandal" ATAS Event

Joshua Malina - 'Scandal' ATAS event at the Directors Guild Of America at Directors Guild Of America - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 1st May 2015

Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina
Joshua Malina

Knights of Badassdom Trailer


Three geeky best friends named Hung, Eric and Joe set out on an adventure of a lifetime to engage in some sword and sorcery style role play. They join a vast group of other LARPers (Live Action Role Players) in a woodland area they name the Fields of Evermore to carry out their dungeons and dragons-esque quest, but when one of them decides to practise a dark spell from an old book, they find themselves facing a genuine paranormal threat. He unwittingly manages to summon a flesh-eating succubus from hell who sets out on a murderous rampage to pick off each role player one by one. Not knowledgeable of demonic menaces of the real kind, the friends must band together to work out how to send the succubus back to its fiery inferno - before it's too late.

Continue: Knights of Badassdom Trailer

Knights Of Badassdom Trailer


Hung, Eric and Joe are best friends totally into sword and sorcery style role play and re-enactment. However, when they set out on an average sword-battling adventure with their fellow LARPers (Live Action Role Players) in some nearby woodland, a mysterious force overtakes the group and they find themselves facing a genuine paranormal threat when an 'imaginary' spell from an old book somehow conjures up a real murderous hell demon who begins to pick off players one by one. Unprepared for threats of this nature, the friends must band together to work out how to destroy demon, while trying to remain alive in the scariest action role play they'll ever experience.

Continue: Knights Of Badassdom Trailer

The West Wing: Season Six Review


OK
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

See Jane Date Review


Grim
Hey, it's a movie about a hot girl who can't meet the right guy! I've never heard of such an original premise before!

The improbably proportioned Charisma Carpenter takes the lead role in this by-the-numbers romantic comedy, which only plays lip service to the comedy part of the equation and nearly ignores the romance part completely. The bulk of the movie (made for TV and now arriving on DVD with no extras sans the removal of its commercials) actually involves Jane's career: She's an assistant editor tasked with editing the memoirs of a soap opera diva (Holly Marie Combs) who was her highschool rival. Turns out the diva's got money to burn but a wrecked personal life, including a dad that won't speak with her for reasons that are never made clear.

Continue reading: See Jane Date Review

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


OK
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Bulworth Review


OK
You know, I've seen Network before, and it's a much better film.

Bulworth is, in the kindest of words, an "homage" to that picture, and at least it has an excellent role model. Simply take the story about a TV newsman who goes nuts, stirs up controversy, and fatally angers the establishment and change it to a US Senator who does the same thing, and you've got Bulworth.

Continue reading: Bulworth Review

View From The Top Review


Terrible

To the endless soundtrack of grating girl-empowerment country music ditties and romantic '80s hair-band rock, Gwyneth Paltrow crash-lands in "View From the Top," playing a Nevada-bred white-trash ditz who dreams of a "glamorous" life as a flight attendant.

There were no survivors (at least in terms of pride) among the cast that includes Christina Applegate, Mark Ruffalo, Candice Bergen and Kelly Preston -- all of whom certainly must have signed on to a script that looked very different from this inept and lifeless comedy.

Having sat on a shelf for more than a year and having been edited down to what feels like an endless 87 minutes (a run-time that short is often a tell-tale sign of desperate post-production rescue attempts), "View From the Top" finds few fresh jokes in its formulaic plot (think "Legally Blonde" at 30,000 feet). Paltrow's career path is challenged by a catty competitor (Applegate) who gets her assigned to puddle-jumpers. A love interest (Ruffalo) in Cleveland (a backwater berg from the movie's point of view) forces her to choose between following her heart and chasing a prestige stewardessing gig on "Paris first class international" flights.

Continue reading: View From The Top Review

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