Joseph Mawle

Joseph Mawle

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Joseph Mawle - The British Academy Television Awards (BAFTAs) 2016 held at the Royal Festival Hall - Arrivals at Royal Festival Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th May 2016

Joseph Mawle
Joseph Mawle

Joseph Mawle - The British Academy Television Awards (BAFTAs) 2016 held at the Royal Festival Hall - Arrivals at Royal Festival Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th May 2016

Joseph Mawle

Joseph Mawle - Jameson Empire Awards 2016 held at Grosvenor House Hotel - Arrivals at Jameson Empire Awards, Grosvenor House - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 20th March 2016

Joseph Mawle
Joseph Mawle

Joseph Mawle - The Empire Film Awards 2016 held at Grosvenor House Hotel - Arrivals at The Empire Film Awards, Grosvenor House - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 20th March 2016

Joseph Mawle

Joseph Mawle - Arrivals for The Jameson Empire Awards 2016 at the Grosvenor House Hotel at Jameson Empire Awards, Grosvenor House - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 20th March 2016

Joseph Mawle
Joseph Mawle

In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer


In The Heart Of The Sea is the true seaman's tale based on the last outing of the Whaling Ship Essex. After setting sale from the port on Nantuckett the 20 man crew expect their journey to be much like the others they've been on, very long and tough but on an old but very trusty ship.

After leaving the port, almost immediately the men are hit by a powerful storm which damages the boat. knowing they must make money and make the trip profitable before returning home, the men continue with their mission. After months of good fishing, the men doc at various ports for supplies. Almost a year into their trip and the Essex is struck by a gigantic whale which causes irreparable damage to the ship's hull.

Stuck with no other choice the surviving men must board one of the incredibly small whaling boats that they have on board. The remaining crew members find themselves stuck in a life-threatening situation, 1000 miles from land, incredibly tight rations and stuck at sea for an unknown amount of time, the crew must find a way to endure - both mentally and physically.

Continue: In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer

Kill Your Friends Review

Weak

First-time director Owen Harris boldly attempts a comedy even blacker than American Psycho or Filth with this 1990s Britpop satire, but he never quite gets the tone right. Based on the bestselling novel by John Niven (who also wrote the screenplay), the film lacks a single character the audience can identify with or root for. And since it's impossible to care about the slimy anti-hero, the movie ends up merely feeling mean-spirited.

The slimeball at the centre is Steven (Nicholas Hoult), an A&R man at Unigram Records at the peak of Britpop in 1997. He's had a run of hot new artists, and doesn't let his loathing of pop music slow him down, tormenting his assistant Rebecca (Georgia King), his faithful scout Darren (Craig Roberts) and his matey colleague Roger (James Corden). He's also so determined to get a promotion that he takes things to violent extremes, then becomes even more annoyed when the job goes to his hated rival Antony (Tom Riley). So now all he has left is the search for another vile musician he can turn into the next big thing.

The film has a sleek, snaky energy to it that nicely recreates the cut-throat atmosphere of the period. And Niven has a lot to say about how the music business abuses truly talented artists while promoting inept stars like Steven's aspiring girl band Songbirds. Essentially, this film is a full-on assault on a British society where self-absorbed jerks climb the corporate ladder because they're ambitious, not because they're actually good at anything. The one sense of balance in the story comes from a cop (Edward Hogg), who's investigating a murder but really wants Steven to help him launch his own musical career. In other words, the film is shouting its themes at the top of its voice, rather than letting them hit the target with quiet precision.

Continue reading: Kill Your Friends Review

Kill Your Friends - Teaser Trailer


It's the mid 90's and the music scene in the UK is booming. Excess is the word of the decade and the music industry runs on a steady supply of drugs, booze and huge amounts of money. Steven Stelfox is a young A&R manager at one of London's biggest labels but in reality it's quite by chance that he's made it. It's a dog-eat-dog industry and when your ideas run out there's a good chance you'll be cast aside. Not wishing to be the next for the chopping block, Stelfox takes his career ambitions to a whole new level. How well would you survive when even your friends are your enemies?

Since its release in 2008, John Niven's book 'Kill Your Friends' has become a cult classic. Niven himself had worked at many record labels and inspired some of the themes behind the story. Whilst the story is fiction and no one was actually killed, many people in the industry draw many parallels to what actually happened during those years.

Kill Your Friends is the first major release for director Owen Harris and sees Nicholas Hoult & James Corden take two of the lead roles.

The Hallow Trailer


Adam and Clare Hitchins have made the decision to re-locate themselves and their baby from London to a remote village in Ireland. Their new house is a former millhouse surrounded by mysterious woodland in which Adam begins to make frequent trips as part of his career as a conservationist. Despite the fact that he isn't doing anything to harm the environment, locals are becoming very concerned over his 'trespassing'. One local by the name of Colm Donnelly takes it upon himself to warn the family to stay away from the forest, claiming that it is home to The Hallow; a formidable presence that haunts the woods with the likes of fairies and banshees, and creatures hellbent on abducting babies. The couple initially brush off the warnings as folklore, but soon become unsettled as it becomes clear just how seriously all the townsfolk, young and old, take it. And when they start to experience terrifying phenomena in their own home, they start to understand why.

Continue: The Hallow Trailer

In The Heart of The Sea - Teaser Trailer


In August of 1819, The Essex set sail from New England. The whaling ship set out beyond the edges of the map to hunt in unknown waters. What the 21-man crew discovered, was far from what they could ever have imagined. A sperm whale - absolutely gigantic and hell-bent on destroying their comparatively tiny ship. While battling the demon of a sea beast, the ship was destroyed, and many of the crew were killed. As the few survivors struggled to find land and make their way back to South America, they faced a harrowing adventure, and fought insanity, storms, starvation and despair. All with the great whale fresh in their minds. The crew referred to it as Moby Dick.

Continue: In The Heart of The Sea - Teaser Trailer

Half Of A Yellow Sun Review


Good

By trying to include an entire acclaimed novel on-screen, first-time filmmaker Biyi Bandele waters down momentous real-life events. The film is fascinating enough to hold our attention as it traces the first decade of Nigeria's independence, but the human drama at the centre never feels like much more than a soap opera.

The story starts in 1960 Lagos, as Nigeria proudly declares independence and looks to a bright future as Africa's largest, most prosperous nation. At the centre are twin sisters educated in America and Britain: Olanna (Thandie Newton) decides against working in the government, travelling north to teach at university; Kainene (Anika Noni Rose) moves east to manage their father's business. But it's their love lives that define them. Olanna falls for colleague Odenigbo (Chiwetel Ejiofor), whose Mama (Onyeka Onwenu) treats her as if she's a witch. Meanwhile, Kainene has a passionate affair with married Englishman Richard (Joseph Mawle). And both of their relationship struggles are echoed in Nigeria's violent birth pangs.

The film is punctuated with newsreel footage from the period, which adds to the authentic production design. The 1960s are recreated on-screen with an attention to detail from the bustling village streets to the stylish Mad Men-like sophistication of upper-class sitting rooms. Indeed, the focus is on the contrast between locals caught in ethnic and religious traditions and the foreign-educated progressive thinkers. So it's no wonder that the country experiences a series of violent coups, ethnic cleansing and a hideous civil war.

Continue reading: Half Of A Yellow Sun Review

Shell Review


Excellent

With a remarkably vivid sense of life in rural Scotland, this tightly contained drama is an impressive debut for writer-director Graham. There isn't much dialog, and yet the filmmaker is able to evoke a strong sense of internal urgency within the characters. And in the demanding title role, newcomer Pirrie is magnetic.

Shell (Pirrie) is a 17-year-old girl who lives with her father Pete (Mawle) at their roadside petrol garage in the middle of nowhere along a highway through the Highlands. Devoted to caring for her dad, who has epilepsy, Shell knows all the customers, including a slightly too-friendly businessman (Smiley) who travels through here regularly. And Pete and Shell are willing to help stranded travellers, such as a couple (Dickie and Hickey) that needs help when they run into a deer on the road. Meanwhile, nice local guy Adam (De Caestecker) wants to take Shell away from here, but the thought of that triggers slightly too-affectionate feelings about her dad.

The film is a marvel of tiny details, as Shell and Pete communicate without the need for many words. And Graham's cameras capture every sideways glance, hint of a smile, light touch and uncomfortable scowl to let us see how isolated this father and daughter are from the rest of civilisation. This style of interaction creates tension that sometimes feels rather dangerous. For example, after Pete takes a trip into town, Shell sniffs him like a jealous wife. Yes, these are raw performances that are often unnerving. And since we see everything through Pirrie's expressive, haunted, hopeful eyes, we can't help but be drawn into her world.

Continue reading: Shell Review

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Review


Very Good
A riotous combination of rah-rah American patriotism and overwrought special effects nonsense, this cheeky bit of fantasy history is rather good fun. Yes, it's also completely ridiculous, but the visual flair and fast pace keep us happily entertained.

Young Abe Lincoln (Walker) is determined to get revenge against the sinister Barts (Czokas), who had something to do with his mother's death. But it turns out that Barts is immortal, so Abe's new friend Henry (Cooper) trains him in how to fight vampires. Meanwhile, Abe pursues a career in politics, marries Mary (Winstead) and discovers that the alpha vampire (Sewell) is using the Civil War as a cover for bloodsuckers to take over America. Along with his intrepid friends (Mackie and Simpson), Abe sets out to turn the tide at Gettysburg.

Continue reading: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Review

The Cold Light Of Day Trailer


Will Shaw is a young Wall Street trader, who comes from a well off family. One summer, they all decide to holiday in Spain, on their yacht. Will meets them at the airport and they head to their boat together.

Continue: The Cold Light Of Day Trailer

The Awakening Review


Good
A nifty twist on the standard ghost story, this British period drama starts extremely well and then slips into overwrought melodrama. And while the plot feels a little too gimmicky, at least it's complex enough to hold our interest.

In 1921 England, Florence (Hall) makes a fortune debunking fake psychics who claim to talk to the ghosts of Brits who died from war and flu over the previous decade. Her latest challenge is to solve a mystery at a private school in Cumbria, working with teacher Robert (West) and matron Maud (Staunton).

Rumour has it that the ghost of a schoolboy haunts the house, so Florence sets out to find out what's really going on. But she has her scepticism shaken to the core by some genuinely bizarre events.

Continue reading: The Awakening Review

Joseph Mawle

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Joseph Mawle Movies

In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer

In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer

In The Heart Of The Sea is the true seaman's tale based on the last...

Kill Your Friends Movie Review

Kill Your Friends Movie Review

First-time director Owen Harris boldly attempts a comedy even blacker than American Psycho or Filth...

Kill Your Friends - Teaser Trailer

Kill Your Friends - Teaser Trailer

It's the mid 90's and the music scene in the UK is booming. Excess is...

The Hallow Trailer

The Hallow Trailer

Adam and Clare Hitchins have made the decision to re-locate themselves and their baby from...

In The Heart of The Sea Trailer

In The Heart of The Sea Trailer

In August of 1819, The Essex set sail from New England. The whaling ship set...

Half of a Yellow Sun Movie Review

Half of a Yellow Sun Movie Review

By trying to include an entire acclaimed novel on-screen, first-time filmmaker Biyi Bandele waters down...

Shell Movie Review

Shell Movie Review

With a remarkably vivid sense of life in rural Scotland, this tightly contained drama is...

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

A riotous combination of rah-rah American patriotism and overwrought special effects nonsense, this cheeky bit...

The Cold Light Of Day Trailer

The Cold Light Of Day Trailer

Will Shaw is a young Wall Street trader, who comes from a well off family....

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

As a boy, Abraham Lincoln learns from his father, Thomas, that vampires are real. Worse...

The Awakening Movie Review

The Awakening Movie Review

A nifty twist on the standard ghost story, this British period drama starts extremely well...

The Awakening Trailer

The Awakening Trailer

After the traumatic events of the First World War, many devastated people are turning to...

Made In Dagenham Trailer

Made In Dagenham Trailer

In 1960's England, there wasn't such a thing as womens rights in the workplace, for...

Heartless Movie Review

Heartless Movie Review

Layered and dense, there's clearly a lot going on in this dark thriller, although it's...

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