Joseph Fiennes

Joseph Fiennes

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Strangerland Trailer


In the small Australian town of Nathgari, the Parker family are trying to adjust to their new life. Catherine (Nicole Kidman) and Matthew (Joseph Fiennes) keep to themselves most of the time, but when their teenage children, Tommy (Nicholas Hamilton) and Lilly (Maddison Brown) disappear into the desert, their lives are changed forever. When a search is begun by one of the town's policemen David Rae (Hugo Weaving), the Parkers join in. And when a terrible dust storm spreads across the town, the locals begin to blame the Parkers for meddling in ancient Aboriginal traditions. As the summer comes and the heat begins to rise, the Parkers are forced to clear their name while they might still have a chance to save their children.

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Hercules Review


Good

Far more entertaining than it has any right to be, this is a big, messy blockbuster retelling of the Greek myth that thankfully has a sharp sense of humour and some surprising twists up its sleeve. The cast is also packed with veteran performers who know how to make the most of some eyebrow-raising innuendo, generating intrigue while keeping the audience laughing with them rather than at them.

The premise takes a revisionist approach, grounding the legend of the demigod Hercules (Dwayne Johnson) in real stories that have been exaggerated by his nephew Iolaus (Reece Ritchie), who travels with him as a kind of toga-era marketing expert. Their team of mercenaries includes wryly fatalistic seer Amphiaraus (Ian McShane), quick-witted blade-thrower Autolycus (Rufus Sewell), bow-wielding amazon Atalanta (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and loyal mute warrior Tydeus (Aksel Hennie). When they're offered a fortune by Lord Cotys (John Hurt) to quell a rebellion, they find themselves in the middle of a massive battle that doesn't go the way they expected. And as events take unforeseen turns, Hercules and his gang have to dig deep to turn the tide in their favour.

Johnson is a natural in the role, so massively pumped up that he looks like he could be popped with a pin. His hulking physique and just enough back-story give the character's reputation some weight, both literally and figuratively, so even if he's not half-god his achievements are still pretty impressive. (There are also plenty of hints that he may turn out to be a god after all.) And the surrounding characters add to this with cleverly written roles that are expertly played by British scene-stealers Hurt, McShane, Sewell, Mullan and Fiennes. McShane is so good that he essentially walks off with the whole movie. But relative newcomers Ritchie, Hennie and Berdal more than hold their own.

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Hercules - Extended Trailer


Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus and his people, all Hercules wants from life is to rest quietly with a loving family. Unfortunately for him, now is not the time for resting as the gods have delivered another bout of chaos to the world. Being well known by all as a man with all the strength of a god, Hercules is forced to lead a battle against a new menace as the King of Thrace gets him and some like minded warriors to band together as the world's most formidable army. They must defeat a powerful rival general as the vicious descendents of Hades infect the land. It's a deadly mission, the minions of hell being immortal and ruthless, and their defeat can only be accomplished by someone with power above the mortal realm.

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Hercules - Trailer Trailer


Hercules is a bitter and haunted demi-god filled with resentment for the people and the gods (including his father Zeus) who put him through the Twelve Labours; a series of arduous tasks that saw him dance with death on a number of occasions. Now, alone and with no family of any kind to turn to, his only comfort in the world is fighting to the death in battle, alongside a group of other like-minded warriors who similarly have nothing left to live for. However, they face a challenge of a more ominous kind when the King of Thrace enlists them to train up as the most formidable army ever created in a bid to overthrow a powerful general. This is a fight of a different kind for Hercules; he may have more strength than the average man, but just how far will that take him?

Dwayne Johnson stars as Hercules in the latest adaptation of the Greco-Roman myth. Based on the graphic novel 'Hercules: The Thracian Wars' by Steve Moore, the movie has been directed by Brett Ratner ('Rush Hour', 'X-Men: The Last Stand', 'Red Dragon') and written by Ryan Condal ('The Sixth Gun') and Evan Spiliotopoulos ('The Nutty Professor', 'Battle for Terra'). 'Hercules' is scheduled for UK cinematic release on August 8th 2014.

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Spolier Alert! What To Expect From American Horror Story Episode Two


Zachary Quinto Jessica Lange James Cromwell Evan Peters Joseph Fiennes Sarah Paulson

If you thought the premiere of American Horror Story Season 2 was good, you had better prepare yourself for some serious thrills in episode two.

If you don’t want to know what happens, then stop reading now, but if you just can’t wait until the next episode hits your television screens, then read on, there’s some pretty exciting stuff in store.

As the first episode ended, so the second begins, with Theresa (played by Jenna Dewan Tatum) running away from the gruesome Bloody Face. We’ll tell you that much, but we won’t tell you what happens to her, just yet. What we will tell you though is that Zachary Quinto makes his debut as Dr. Oliver Thredson. E! Online have described him as “a breath of fresh air for viewers” and fans of the show will relish seeing how he interacts with the likes of Sister Jude (Jessica Lange) and Dr. Arden (James Cromwell) when he comes to Briarcliffe to assess whether or not Kit (Evan Peters) is fit for trial. He learns a thing or two about modern psychiatric teachings, from a patient who suggests that not all can be explained by what he has already learned.

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Hollywood Costume - press view held at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Shakespeare, Love, Gwyneth Paltrow, Viola, Lesseps, Joseph Fiennes and Will Shakespeare - Shakespeare in Love - Gwyneth Paltrow as Viola de Lesseps and Joseph Fiennes as Will Shakespeare Wednesday 17th October 2012 Hollywood Costume - press view held at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

Maria Dolores Dieguez and Joseph Fiennes - Maria Dolores Dieguez and Joseph Fiennes Saturday 13th October 2012 Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

Joseph Fiennes and Maria Dolores Dieguez - Joseph Fiennes; Maria Dolores Dieguez Saturday 13th October 2012 Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

Joseph Fiennes and Maria Dolores Dieguez

Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

Joseph Fiennes Saturday 13th October 2012 Premiere Screening of FX's 'American Horror Story: Asylum' at the Paramount Theatre

The Red Baron Trailer


Watch the Trailer for The Red Baron

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The Red Baron [Der Rote Baron] Review


Weak
This is an ambitious attempt to tell the story of World War I's most notorious fighter pilot. But while the events are truly momentous, with thrillingly rendered aerial combat, the film is let down by lacklustre writing and direction.

By 1916, 23-year-old Baron Manfred von Richthofen (Schweighofer) has become the most feared German pilot. With his lurid red plane, he has no interest in catching the Allied forces by surprise: he wants to scare them. But he's also a gentleman, engaging in sport and refusing to be cruel. He's also a strong leader to his fellow pilots, including best pal Voss (Schweiger) and little brother Lothar (Buch). And even Allied pilots like the Canadian Roy Brown (Fiennes) respect him.

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Moet & Chandon: A Tribute To Cinema held at the Big Sky Studios.

Joseph Fiennes Tuesday 24th March 2009 Moet & Chandon: A Tribute To Cinema held at the Big Sky Studios. London, England

Dust (2001) Review


Terrible
Here's a uniquely bad movie that combines not one unwatchable story, but two!

It begins when a punk kid breaks into an old woman's house. The old lady overpowers him, and forces him to listen to a story. She even ends up in a hospital, and the kid follows her there to keep hearing this damn story.

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The Darwin Awards Review


OK
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

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Running with Scissors Review


Weak
In a game effort to deflect the immediate suspicions of most viewers likely to be mistrustful of its all-too-convenient cast of wildly entertaining eccentrics, the young boy narrating Running with Scissors acknowledges, somewhat ruefully, early on that "nobody's going to believe me anyway." It's a smart maneuver, given what follows in this overly energetic adaptation of Augusten Burroughs' bestselling 2002 memoir about growing up in the 1970s with a mentally damaged mother who sent him off to be raised by her psychiatrist in his house of David Lynch-ian strangeness. As it stands, Running with Scissors is best taken as a literary memoir and not judged on its complete veracity but whether it works as a story of flawed people in an environment that seems to cater to all their worst impulses. It almost does.

The film opens in 1972, showing a young Augusten as an audience of one for his mother Deirdre's in-home poetry reading, microphone and all. The bilious, self-aggrandizing manner with which Deirdre (Annette Bening) gives her reading tells you pretty much all you need to know about the opinion she holds as to her place in the world and any who may disagree. Any remaining questions about her fitfulness as a mother are answered when the film jumps to its primary setting in the late '70s, where Deirdre has become a whirling dervish of arrogant fury and spite. Her obsessive belief that she is an important poet being kept from her rightful place at the center of the literary firmament drives away first Augusten's father (Alec Baldwin, lightly soused) and then Augusten, whom she decides would be better off living with her exceedingly unorthodox psychiatrist, Dr. Finch (Brian Cox). A devout and at least partially mad Freudian of the most unrecondite sort, Finch keeps a special room next to his doctor's office which he calls The Masturbatorium and divines the future from the shape of his bowel movements. Seemingly he's not much of a father figure.

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Joseph Fiennes

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