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Jonathan Pryce Thursday 15th September 2011 36th Annual Toronto International Film Festival - 'Hysteria' premiere arrival at The Roy Thomson Hall. Toronto, Canada

Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce and Palladium - Tuesday 12th October 2010 at London Palladium London, England

Jonathan Pryce and Palladium
Jonathan Pryce and Palladium

Jonathan Pryce - Friday 27th August 2010 at BAFTA Century City, California

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce Friday 30th July 2010 LIPA Graduation ceremony at the Philharmonic Hall. Liverpool, England

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce and Laurence Olivier Sunday 21st March 2010 The 2010

Jonathan Pryce and Laurence Olivier
Jonathan Pryce and Laurence Olivier

Jonathan Pryce and Laurence Olivier Sunday 21st March 2010 attends The Laurence Olivier Awards at The Grosvenor House Hotel London, England

Jonathan Pryce and Laurence Olivier

Jonathan Pryce - Monday 31st March 2008 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Los Angeles, California

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Aidan Gillen and Jonathan Pryce - Aidan Gillen, Jonathan Pryce, Peter McDonald and Matthew Marsh London, England - Opening night of Glengarry Glen Ross at the Apollo Theatre and the after party celebration held at The Mint Leaf Restaurant Friday 12th October 2007

Aidan Gillen and Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce and Aidan Gillen
Jonathan Pryce and Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen
Aidan Gillen

Jonathan Pryce - Saturday 19th May 2007 at Disneyland Anaheim, California

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen Review


Good
Before he made The Brothers Grimm, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen was arguably Terry Gilliam's least popular film. The story is slow to start, takes too long to finish, and meanders almost irredeemably until finally paying off in the end. The story is adapted from the "tall tale" book of the same name, which gives us a self-proclaimed baron (John Neville in a career-defining role) who regales anyone who'll listen with story after story, each more absurd than the last. The highlight is the film's first major storytelling sequence, a flashback that involves Munchausen and his band of misfits trying to win a bet -- and doing so in amazing style. But so much of the film is so irrelevant that these feel like huge highlights lost in a sea of mediocrity and bad editing.

Carrington Review


OK
I hate to stereotype...but I will anyway. I simply find it inconceivable that a real woman could go for 17 years without once changing her hair. The woman in question is Emma Thompson, portraying English painter Dora Carrington in post-WWI England. The hairdo in question is a peculiar blonde bob that has the daunting task of making Thompson look "boyish."

If you're like me, you're saying to yourself, "Who is this Dora Carrington, and why would someone make a movie about her?" Well, I still don't have the answer to that one. Carrington was something of a homebody who thrived on shocking Victorian sensibilities with her outrageous behavior, the bulk of which involved sexual promiscuity in some fashion or another. Most notable among her odd and largely meaningless "flings" was a doomed-from-the-start relationship with troublesome writer Lytton Strachey (Jonathan Pryce), a bearded, neo-Oscar Wilde who couldn't function normally without substantial babysitting from Carrington and/or any number of her lovers.

Continue reading: Carrington Review

Bride Of The Wind Review


OK
Sarah Wynter doesn't quite have the chops, Bruce Beresford doesn't quite have the heart, and the audience probably doesn't have anywhere near the level of interest to sustain this biopic about Alma Mahler nee Schindler, the wife of composer Gustav Mahler and the mistress of a handful of other men down the line. The thesis here is that There's Something About Alma, something that inspires greatness in artists of all forms (including painter Gustav Klimt), but Beresford never gets close to putting his finger on just what that is.

Continue reading: Bride Of The Wind Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review


Very Good
Any sailor worth his salt knows that "pirate" is a curse word you don't dare utter on the high seas. You just might summon the scavengers' fearful wrath.

Actually, "pirate" wasn't a word you wanted to mention in Hollywood, either. Calling the genre troublesome is an understatement, as directors who attempted big-budget pirate adventures were plagued with disastrous shoots, and the films received lukewarm response at the box office. Everything from Roman Polanski's Pirates to Renny Harlin's Cutthroat Island immediately sank to the depths of Davy Jones's locker.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review

The Affair Of The Necklace Review


OK
There are inherent risks in making a costume drama -- giving everything too much weight, and not getting the mood just right. The opportunity for grandiose accents, overly lavish wardrobe, and stagy, oh-so-clever performances are there for the suffering, and many such films deliver snickers rather than oohs and aahs (I still believe Elizabeth to be one of those). The Affair of the Necklace falls right into that category as well, dealing with the French aristocracy with a heavy hand and far too much giggling.

Perhaps the problem is director Charles Shyer, a guy known for his comedic streak, both as the man behind the Father of the Bride movies, and as a writer working with wife Nancy Meyers (The Parent Trap, Baby Boom). With Shyer's swing over to drama, it's tough to tell if parts of The Affair of the Necklace are supposed to be funny.

Continue reading: The Affair Of The Necklace Review

Regeneration Review


Weak
And I thought it would be difficult to take all the thrill out of a war movie. Regeneration manages to do exactly that by putting the setting at the end of World War I -- not in the action, but in a mental hospital, where a couple of British poets are being treated for shell shock. Poets. Shell shock. This is not excitement -- and I'm a writer for a living! (The film is based on a true story about a genuinely crazy poet.)

Continue reading: Regeneration Review

Stigmata Review


Good
Visually stimulating films are generally the easiest to critique. The reason for this phenomenon is that most filmmakers tend to concentrate primarily upon action, cinematography, or special effects and all too often lose focus on plot, which is a key element in the success of a film. This has happened so frequently in past years that I can now determine within the first ten minutes whether a movie will disappear into that vast black hole of forgettable lackluster science-fiction/horror films of the nineties or have some potential for long-term success.

The upside to this way of thinking is that when you get a film that combines great visuals with a decent plot then you can have an extremely entertaining product along the lines of an Event Horizon or The Matrix. Luckily for us, Stigmata, directed by Rupert Wainwright (The Sadness of Sex, Blank Check) is one of those films that successfully molds story line with powerful visuals to make for an entertaining and eerie adventure. It's like watching a two-hour music video on MTV. An exciting fusion of neo-punk culture combined with ancient religious rites.

Continue reading: Stigmata Review

Glengarry Glen Ross Review


Essential
Pacino should have won an Oscar for his performance as a land salesman/con-man in this ensemble piece about what happens on the other side of the phone line during those late night sales pitches you get. In this case it's real estate (worthless, of course, though that's never stated) the sharks are selling. And they aren't really that good at it, either. Pacino's the rainmaker of the group, but supporting characters played by Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, and Ed Harris are struggling. When some breaks in to the manager's (Kevin Spacey) office and steals the good "Glengarry" leads, all hell breaks loose.

Who knew director James Foley had this movie in him. With credits from Who's That Girl? to Fear to The Corruptor, Foley hasn't made a passable movie before or since this 1992 production. Having a script by David Mamet (based on his stage play) doesn't hurt, nor does having at least two screen legends in the cast. Hell, even the minor characters are stellar. Jonathan Pryce's beaten-down mark is one of the most memorably pathetic losers on celluloid. Alec Baldwin's five minutes of screen time here is his greatest work ever.

Continue reading: Glengarry Glen Ross Review

Ronin Review


Excellent
Ronin is one of the few action movies that I can chew on without having to regurgitate. Normally, the action film fills me with a sort of dread. In fact, per my recollection, Ronin filled me with a sort of dread the first time around (despite Robert De Niro being in the film). You see, the action film is a sort of black hole for the industry. Money gets sucked into the film but it passes a sort of Event Horizon, at which point no matter how much money is poured in, the movie is still terrible. Sure, it is so absolutely dumb that you can sit back and enjoy it anyway, but the fact of the matter is that by the time the action movie has passed this point of no return you know you are watching trash.

Every year, millions get sucked into this vortex and all we get out of it are surgically enhanced chest shots of women who have just been bumped up from doing soft core. Of the three dozen odd action flicks that come out in any given year, only ten are worth viewing again. Of those ten, only two or three are actually good films. Ronin was actually good.

Continue reading: Ronin Review

The Brothers Grimm Review


Bad
If you stop to think about it, weren't the Brothers Grimm stories demented enough that they really didn't need to be made into a horror movie? Not that it's stopped several other people from touching the subject matter before, but no one has quite given the Grimm fairy tales the molestation that they get in the latest rendition of this story.

In the latest Grimm, the brother-tellers are snakeskin oil salesmen, with younger brother Jacob always focused on the fairy tale world. When a string of abductions, (including Red Riding Hood and Gretel) in the village of Marbaden catch the attention of a French General (Jonathan Pryce, playing Ian Holm's Napoleon from Time Bandits) who only seems interested in a good meal, he sends Italian torturer Cavaldi (Peter Stormare) to grab the German con men out of bed to send them to investigate the problem.

Continue reading: The Brothers Grimm Review

Brazil Review


Essential
Categorically, one of the greatest films of the century--about a lowly clerk in a postmodern dystopia fighting to regain a sense of self against the all-powerful machine of government tyranny. As fought-over as Citizen Kane. As filled with nuance and meaning as A Clockwork Orange. As prophetic as 1984. Anyone who doesn't like Brazil is a fascist. You can tell them I said so.

Continue reading: Brazil Review

The Brothers Grimm Review


Weak

There could be no one better than Terry Gilliam to direct a tongue-in-cheek supernatural thriller set in a world of fairytales.

Unfortunately, in "The Brothers Grimm" -- a movie with a Terry Gilliam look and feel but without a Terry Gilliam soul -- the eccentric genius behind "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," "12 Monkeys" and "Brazil" seems to have had his spirit broken by studio mandates (like a hottie love interest) and commercial constraints (like a curtailed run time).

Set in French-occupied Germany during the early 19th century, the fable-warping story reinvents the the legendary Grimms as good-natured con artists, who only later became authors, immortalizing the likes of Snow White, Rumpelstiltskin and the Golden Goose by putting their own famous dark-candy spin on familiar folk tales. Here wily huckster Wilhelm (Matt Damon) and frustrated idealistic scholar Jakob (Heath Ledger) are traveling snake-oil salesmen, exploiting local superstitions, staging theatrical hauntings, then peddling their services as ghost busters.

Continue reading: The Brothers Grimm Review

Very Annie-Mary Review


Weak

Beware the quirky Brit-com -- especially the kind that take place in a quiet little village. They can and will turn on a dime from oddly humorous to tediously sentimental.

"Very Annie-Mary" is such a prime example of this phenomenon that it even makes blatant reference to similar movies on several occasions. What's with the 10-year-old kids acting out rather inappropriate scenes from "The Full Monty" in their front garden?

Those kids are only seen in passing in this film, but the title character isn't any more original. She's a slightly feeble-witted, child-like adult and wannabe singer whose dreams are always quashed by the terribly domineering single parent with whom she still lives. If this sounds familiar, you've probably seen "Little Voice," this genre's high water mark. If it doesn't sound familiar, rent "Little Voice" and save yourself the trouble of sitting through this inferior imitator.

Continue reading: Very Annie-Mary Review

Stigmata Review


Bad

A goth-lite rehashing of "The Exorcist" -- by way of "The Crow," with a pinch of Madonna's "Like A Prayer" video tossed in for flavor -- "Stigmata" has terminal case of style over substance.

From the movie's very first frame, the story -- about a generically funky Pittsburgh hairdresser (Patricia Arquette) who becomes possessed and inflicted with the wounds of Christ -- takes a back seat to moody, underexposed photography, a never-ending rainstorm allusion and rave-spastic editing set to a soundtrack by Billy Corgan of The Smashing Pumpkins and Elia Cmiral ("Ronin").

Arquette plays Frankie Paige, a non-believer who starts channeling a dead priest after being given his stolen rosary as a gift. When she begins exhibiting signs of stigmata, an ordained investigator (Gabriel Byrne) --with faith issues of his own, natch -- is sent to debunk her case by a crooked, cover-up-happy Vatican cardinal with delusions of grandeur (Jonathan Pryce). But Byrne becomes a believer and tries to protect the girl from his superiors.

Continue reading: Stigmata Review

What A Girl Wants Review


Weak

Knowing full well that the audience for "What a Girl Wants" would consist almost entirely of 'tween girls too young to recognize its artificiality and paint-by-numbers banality, director Dennie Gordon doesn't even bother trying to make the picture palpable to anyone with more discerning tastes.

A lollypops-and-rainbows adventure about a free-spirited New York teenager (the Nickelodeon-launched Amanda Bynes) running away to London to find the blue-blooded daddy she's never known (Colin Firth), it's a movie that virtually ignores its raison d'etre of father-daughter bonding in favor of stock tourist footage (with Bynes hanging off the back of a double-decker bus), music-video shopping montages, rivalries with snooty soon-to-be step-sisters, and flirtations with an unthreateningly cute working-class boy (Oliver James) who plays guitar and rides a motorcycle.

Growing up in a fifth-floor Chinatown walkup with her bohemian wedding-singer single mom (Kelly Preston), Daphne Reynolds (Bynes) has always heard the story of how her parents met as globetrotting college kids and were married by a Bedouin tribal chief before going to England to "get married for real" (the film makes several such offensively ethnocentric gaffes). But when his crusty family sent her packing and lied to the young Lord Henry Dashwood (Firth), saying she had left him, mom went back to the U.S. pregnant and Henry matured into a stiff-upper-lip politician.

Continue reading: What A Girl Wants Review

Bride Of The Wind Review


OK

The supernaturally beautiful and intelligently pensive-looking Sarah Wynter makes quite an entrance as Alma Mahler at the beginning of "Bride of the Wind."

Arriving at a cocktail party in turn-of-the-Century Vienna, she sheds her wrap to reveal a corseted red dress that would be a knockout even if the scene wasn't shot in black-and-white with the dress the only splash of color. Director Bruce Beresford is just illustrating the point that when Alma entered a room, people noticed.

As she passes through the party, the color follows her, bringing the screen to life, but even without the aid of symbolic contrast, Wynter ("American Psycho," "The 6th Day") would still dominate the frame. This is as it should be since her character is a woman who captured the hearts and inspired the works of several great artists of her time.

Continue reading: Bride Of The Wind Review

The Affair Of The Necklace Review


Bad

American filmmakers have a tendency to over-think their historical period pictures. They ply costume dramas with grandiose imagery, tediously over-written dialog and gratingly over-scored soundtracks in the hopes of overwhelming an audience with a sense of antiquity. And their actors -- especially their American actors -- often seem uncomfortable and incongruous.

Even when such films turn out well, there's always something awkward about them. Think of Francis Ford Coppola's "The Age of Innocence," Andy Tennant's "Anna and the King" or Steven Spielberg's "Amistad" -- all too conspicuously theatrical to be genuinely transporting and/or saddled with one or two actors who are amiss just enough to stand out.

But when such films turn out badly, they turn out like "The Affair of the Necklace," a discombobulated, transparently fictionalized French Revolutionary melodrama about an orphaned, impoverished aristocrat conspiring against the crown to restore her family name and property.

Continue reading: The Affair Of The Necklace Review

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Jonathan Pryce Movies

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

There's a somewhat contrived jauntiness to this blending of fact and fiction that may leave...

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

Charles Dickens might be one of the most legendary authors in history, but it wasn't...

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Listen Up Philip Trailer

Listen Up Philip Trailer

Philip Lewis Friedman is a very successful writer, though not the most likeable of people....

The Salvation Movie Review

The Salvation Movie Review

Just when you thought no one could come up with a fresh take on the...

Woman in Gold Movie Review

Woman in Gold Movie Review

This fascinating true story is strong enough to hold up against the formulaic Hollywood treatment,...

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Woman In Gold - Clips And Trailer

Woman In Gold - Clips And Trailer

When the Nazis took over Vienna prior to the Second World War, they stole countless,...

The Salvation Trailer

The Salvation Trailer

In the 1870s, Danish settlers travelled to the US following a brutal war with Germany....

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Movie Review

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Movie Review

By ignoring everything that made 2009's G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra a hugely entertaining...

Hysteria Movie Review

Hysteria Movie Review

There's probably a fascinating, complex story behind the invention of the vibrator in 19th century...

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer

After the events of the first film, which saw them take on an organisation called...

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra Movie Review

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra Movie Review

Frankly, this is what summer movies should be like. The filmmakers have harvested the coolest...

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