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Jonathan Pryce - The British Film Institute's LUMINOUS gala dinner held at Guildhall - Arrivals at Guildhall - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 6th October 2015

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Jonathan Pryce

Dame Helen Mirren Wants To Star In A 'Fast & Furious' Film - And Yes, You Did Read That Correctly!


Helen Mirren Ryan Reynolds Daniel Bruhl Katie Holmes Tatiana Maslany Jonathan Pryce Elizabeth McGovern Charles Dance Max Irons Vin Diesel

Helen Mirren is not a woman to turn down difficult roles. She has, after all, played three different Queens of the United Kingdom and, in a voice part, the Queen of Egypt. Yet there is nothing 69-year-old Mirren would like more than to star in a Fast and Furious film and do her own driving stunts.

Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren would love to be in a Fast and Furious movie.

Read More: Helen Mirren Brings The Queen To Broadway In Speculative Drama The Audience [Photos].

Continue reading: Dame Helen Mirren Wants To Star In A 'Fast & Furious' Film - And Yes, You Did Read That Correctly!

Jonathan Pryce - Game of Thrones Season 5 Premiere - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 18th March 2015

Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce - Shots of a variety of stars as they arrived to the World premiere of the fifth season of 'Game of Thrones' which was held at the Tower of London in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 18th March 2015

Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce - Miss Saigon Press Night at the Prince Edward Theatre - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 21st May 2014

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce - The gala screening of 'The Stag' held at the Vue West End, Leicester Square - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 13th March 2014

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce - Celebrities outside Hampstead Theatre for the production 'Good People' - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 5th March 2014

Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce - U.K. film premiere of 'G.I. Joe: Retaliation' held at the Empire Cinema- Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 18th March 2013

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Hysteria Review


Good

There's probably a fascinating, complex story behind the invention of the vibrator in 19th century London, but this silly farce isn't it. Instead, this is a comical romp that just happens to be set against the birth of the most popular sex toy in history. It's nicely assembled, with a strong cast, but the tone is so goofy that it never breaks the surface.

It's the late 1880s when young doctor Mortimer (Dancy) takes a job in London with Dalrymple (Pryce), who specialises in treating hysteria, considered a serious medical condition at the time, even though it seems to only afflict women whose husbands are neglecting them socially and sexually. As Mortimer courts Dalrymple's placid younger daughter (Jones), lining himself to take over the practice one day, it's the feisty older daughter (Gyllenhaal) who continually challenges his worldview. And as he treats his patients, Mortimer works with his friend Edmund (Everett) to create a mechanical vibrating device that has an immediate effect on his patients.

Everything in this story is played broadly, as if it's frightfully hilarious to talk about sex in such a straightforward way. But this prudish approach only trivialises everything about the story, from the premise to the characters themselves. And it doesn't help that the script never gives any of these people more than one or two key personality traits. The actors do what they can with them, adding moments of effective drama and comedy while hinting at the serious themes underneath the story. But it's so silly that we never really care about anything that happens.

Continue reading: Hysteria Review

Jonathan Pryce Monday 21st May 2012 The 57th Annual 'Village Voice' Obie Awards Ceremony held at Webster Hall

Jonathan Pryce
Jonathan Pryce

Jonathan Pryce and Tribeca Film Festival Monday 23rd April 2012 2012 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Hysteria' premiere - Arrivals

Jonathan Pryce and Tribeca Film Festival
Jonathan Pryce and Tribeca Film Festival

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer


After the events of the first film, which saw them take on an organisation called COBRA and a notorious arms dealer, the G.I. Joe Team are back in a new adventure.

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Jonathan Pryce Thursday 3rd November 2011 Opening night after party for the Lincoln Center production of 'Other Desert Cities' held at the Marriott Marquis Hotel. New York City, USA

Jonathan Pryce

G.I. Joe: The Rise Of Cobra Review


Excellent
Frankly, this is what summer movies should be like. The filmmakers have harvested the coolest elements from blockbusters over the past five or six years and thrown them all into one wildly entertaining, thoroughly over-the-top action thriller.

US soldiers Duke and Ripcord (Tatum and Wayans) are guarding a terrifying new nano-weapon when they're attacked and then defended by two outrageously high-tech assault forces. They of course eventually join the good side, the G.I. Joes, an elite team led by General Hawk (Quaid). These top commandos (including Nichols, Taghmaoui, Akinnuoye-Agbaje and Park) are hunting Duke's ex Ana (Miller), who has gone over to the dark side to help supervillain arms dealer McCullen (Eccleston) and his Vader-esque evil-doctor sidekick with their nefarious plan for world domination.

Continue reading: G.I. Joe: The Rise Of Cobra Review

Bedtime Stories Review


Good
After dozens of movies, Adam Sandler remains hard to figure out. Most of Sandler's films slavishly follow the mold of most film comedies of the last decade or so: a somewhat funny male star (Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Will Ferrell, Seth Rogen, Adam Sandler) is dropped into an unfunny premise with a lot of gross-out scenes and poop jokes to make up for the lack of laughs.

But the other part of Sandler's "oeuvre" consists of movies like Spanglish and Punch-Drunk Love -- odd hybrids of broad humor and quirk -- and toned-down, frothy mainstream comedies like Click and Bedtime Stories. It would be unfair to accuse Sandler of selling out his artistic vision in these films -- not only because Little Nicky wasn't art, but because the non-manic goofiness of Bedtime Stories may be closer to the real Sandler. And with some script consulting help, someday the real Sandler might make a really good film. Bedtime Stories isn't it, but at least it's mostly aimed in the right direction.

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Bedtime Stories Trailer


Watch the trailer for Bedtime Stories.

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Leatherheads Review


Excellent
With his nonchalant sophistication and relaxed charm, George Clooney often gets compared to the icons of Hollywood's Golden Age, from Cary Grant to Clark Gable. But as Leatherheads demonstrates, the leading man really wants to be the next George Cukor.

A football comedy disguised as a love-triangle-laugher, Leatherheads is a snappy throwback fueled by the filmmaker's affection for a bygone era. Clooney's third directorial effort is his lightest film so far, which only means he isn't flogging the fear-mongering tactics of Sen. Joseph McCarthy (Good Night and Good Luck) or dissecting the deranged brain of a game show host who believes he's a CIA operative (Confessions of a Dangerous Mind).

Continue reading: Leatherheads Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World's End Review


Good
An honest-to-God, brawling, hooting, big ball of popcorn spectacle of a movie, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End fully embraces its ludicrous sense of summer season overkill without succumbing to the bloated tedium that afflicted its disappointing predecessor Dead Man's Chest. Clocking in at just under three hours, it's definitely longer than necessary, but given the number of unresolved plot strands that the last film left strewn about like so much tangled rigging, it's actually amazing the filmmakers are able to tie everything up quite as nicely as they do.

Starting with its unlikely origin as an amusement park ride, the Pirates series quickly mushroomed into a sort of meta-pirate film, a vast and whirligig universe unto itself that drew in every possible nautical cliché and legend possible. Thus the first film concentrated on yo-ho-ho-ing, rum-drinking, and general pirate-y scalawaggery. The second roped in Davy Jones and The Flying Dutchman -- not to mention an excess of secondary characters and familial drama. For the third (but not necessarily last, given the teaser it ends with) entry, the bursting-at-the-seams script tosses in a raging maelstrom, an actual trip to Davy Jones' Locker, and even the sea goddess Calypso. Dead Man's Chest showed that more is not always better, with excess just leading to more excess and a general sense of lethargy -- they were just setting us up for the conclusion and marking time until then. At World's End, however, shows that Hollywood excess, when combined with the right combination of actors and an occasionally smart script, can work out quite nicely, thank you very much.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World's End Review

Tomorrow Never Dies Review


Bad
The arguable nadir of the Bond series, Tomorrow Never Dies finds a weary Brosnan battling, ahem, a Rupert Murdoch-like media mogul who uses mercenaries to start wars just so he can write about them in his newspapers first. Oh, the humanity. While there's a glimmer of sincerity in Tomorrow's notion of current events as media spectacle, the movie gets just about everything dead wrong, from its bad guy (Jonathan Pryce, who I love, is possible the worst villain ever) to its Bond girl (Michelle Yeoh). Even the evil henchman is badly picked: Ricky Jay is a lovable magician, not a hard-nosed killer. Need I mention director Roger Spottiswoode previously helmed Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot! Maybe Bond could have taken her out too.

Continue reading: Tomorrow Never Dies Review

Ronin Review


Excellent
Ronin is one of the few action movies that I can chew on without having to regurgitate. Normally, the action film fills me with a sort of dread. In fact, per my recollection, Ronin filled me with a sort of dread the first time around (despite Robert De Niro being in the film). You see, the action film is a sort of black hole for the industry. Money gets sucked into the film but it passes a sort of event horizon, at which point no matter how much money is poured in, the movie is still terrible. Sure, it is so absolutely dumb that you can sit back and enjoy it anyway, but the fact of the matter is that by the time the action movie has passed this point of no return you know you are watching trash.

Every year, millions get sucked into this vortex and all we get out of it are surgically enhanced chest shots of women who have just been bumped up from doing soft core. Of the three dozen odd action flicks that come out in any given year, only ten are worth viewing again. Of those ten, only two or three are actually good films. Ronin was actually good.

Continue reading: Ronin Review

Brazil Review


Essential
Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) is a civil servant Dilbert at the Ministry of Information. He's a low level office grunt typing his way through a lifetime of meaningless papers in a retro-future totalitarian state. His one escape from his dreary life is his dreams. Bursting with vivid colors, Sam's visions see him with armored wings rising into the bright sky above the cold city. There, in the firmament, Sam battles with Darkness to free a blonde beauty (Kim Greist) imprisoned in a floating cage.

Unfortunately, there are no happy endings for dreamers in this alternate world. Sam always awakens to his mind-numbing existence, only plugging away in a system that rewards only blandness, appeasing his socialite mother (addicted to face lifts) whose only wish is to see her meek son move his way up a corporate ladder to nowhere.

Continue reading: Brazil Review

Something Wicked This Way Comes Review


Good
Try as I might to get into this movie, based on the classic Ray Bradbury tale, I've found myself blocked by its off-putting ways. The guts of the piece are there: Evil carnival comes to town and wreaks havoc on everyone who lives there. But something comes up short that I can't quite place. My best guess: The focus of the film is on two Hardy Boys-like kids who play detective. They aren't very bright nor very likeable, and they detract from some otherwise fun set pieces. In fact, the film is by far at its best when they're nowhere to be seen.

Renaissance Review


Very Good

Animation technology seems to be advancing at exponential speed. Each Pixar film easily out-wows the last, and computer-generated releases are now par-for-the-course for kiddie fare. So its no small achievement that the French drama Renaissance, the feature debut from director Christian Volckman, has one of the most intriguing visual styles in years.

Volckman combines motion-capture elements, computer animation, and meticulous black-and-white art for a unique style and fitting medium for his hard-boiled futuristic detective story. The city is Paris. The year is 2054. And the plot centers on a kidnapped girl, a steely cop, and a sci-fi conspiracy involving medicine, government and commerce.

Normally, it might take viewers a few revelatory scenes to get involved in a multi-layered potboiler, but you don't really get that opportunity here--your brain is too busy adjusting to the aesthetic. Renaissance's stark black-and-white imagery is just that: black, and white. Grays and shadows don't seem to surface (if there even are any). What's left is a palette of extremes, rich black and shockingly bare white, making both a visual statement and a narrative one.

Continue reading: Renaissance Review

De-Lovely Review


Very Good
In a darkened room an elderly man sits at a piano. He's barely outlined by light from a window, his face obscured in shadow. Then, a light fades up, spotlighting him, followed by light everywhere. Thus starts De-Lovely and its style of self-aware artificiality. It purports to be the life of composer Cole Porter (Kevin Kline) but there's little more here than a grand retrospective of his ingenious touch with a pop song and an attempt at scandalizing his personal, bisexual life.

Like a symphony that's incomplete because all the notes aren't available, what I didn't get out of this is a three-dimensional portrait of the subject. The show, structured as a dead or dying man's vision of his life played out like a movie and stage production, is loaded with talent and a detailed recreation of his period. The portrayal of the swank, rich life is as festive to behold as it is off-putting. The world in which Porter whirls and commands with assured, inevitable success is an alien one. Rather than feel a part of it, we are there to revel in the entertainment.

Continue reading: De-Lovely Review

Man On Fire (1987) Review


Weak
Fairly awful, this star-studded revenge flick gives us a freaked-out Scott Glenn getting vengeance on the kidnappers who got his charge, a young Italian girl. The film begins with Glenn getting zipped up into a body bag, so we know things aren't going to go all that well. But don't mess with him: He's a man on fire! He'll get his due before he meets his end (or did he -- gasp! -- fake his death?)... and you'll get little more than a dull headache.

What A Girl Wants Review


Weak
Don't be fooled by the title. Despite being named after a Christina Aguilera song, What a Girl Wants is not a movie about a good-girl-turned-trashy-ho. Rather, it's the story of a sweet, all-American girl who generally enjoys her life but can't get past one thing: She's never met her father. As her high school days come to an end, young Daphne Reynolds (Amanda Bynes) decides it's time to meet this mysterious man who managed to woo her mother so many years ago, and so she throws her passport into her backpack and heads off to London.

What ensues is a standard fairy tale: Daphne quickly finds her father, Henry (Colin Firth), but is hindered in her attempt to forge a meaningful relationship thanks to an evil stepmother and debutante stepsister who are only interested in Henry's status and wealth. Fortunately, Daphne's got her American charm on her side and, with the help of her wise grandmother and cute new boyfriend, she's able to win Henry's heart and even manages to get him back together with mom. They all live happily ever after, as we are told at the end.

Continue reading: What A Girl Wants Review

Evita Review


Weak
Now I understand why Argentineans wanted Madonna to go home during the filming of Evita!

What the fuss is all about, I have no idea, because Evita is just another bad movie starring one of our worst actresses, Madonna. The catch is, this time she gets to sing sing sing for 2 1/2 hours -- sing until she can sing no more -- sing until your ears bleed.

Continue reading: Evita Review

Taliesin Jones Review


Good
Not quite a religious film, not quite a coming-of-age story, not quite a kiddie flick, and not quite a supernatural horror movie, Taliesin Jones's identity crisis nonetheless reveals a sweet examination of one child and his thoughts on God.

A Welsh lad, young Taliesin (John-Paul Macleod) suddenly takes an interest in religion when his doddering neighbor and local kook Billy (Ian Bannen, Waking Ned Devine) miraculously heals a stooped woman's back by laying his hands upon her. A skeptical Taliesin is likewise healed of his ugly warts, thanks to Billy's powers (and, therefore, God's powers) -- or did they just go away on their own?

Continue reading: Taliesin Jones Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review


Very Good

The very idea of a movie based on a Disneyland ride -- let alone such a movie produced by Jerry "Kaboom" Bruckheimer, whose standards of quality extend only to the explosions that substituted for plot in 15 years of imbecilic summer blockbusters -- had me dreading "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl" since it was first announced almost two years ago.

But I'm now here to eat every bad word I said in anticipation of this matinee marvel. Exhilarating from beginning to end, vivid with atmosphere, cleverly cliché-mocking, and blessed with two top-notch, over-the-top performances by Johnny Depp and Geoffrey Rush (I should have trusted these two intrepid actors), it may well be one of the most enjoyable pirate escapades of all time.

Festooned in a three-point hat over gypsy hair, a billowy shirt, kohl-blackened eyes and gold-capped teeth that he thrusts forward as he speaks, Depp stars as Capt. Jack Sparrow, a dirty, flirty, disarmingly dishonest swashbuckler of subtly dubious sexuality (a covert pirate flick custom since the silent era) who sails into a 17th century Caribbean colonial port atop the mast of a rapidly sinking sailboat.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review

De-Lovely Review


Good

"This is one of those avant-garde things, is it?" says a droll, dubious and dying Cole Porter (Kevin Kline) as he sits in an empty theater at the beginning of "De-Lovely," watching his life pass before his eyes on the stage, in a production conducted by an enigmatic, ironic, ethereal director named Gabe (Jonathan Pryce).

The answer to his question is a delighted "yes." This film is an imaginative, deconstructionist, celebratory musical biography woven together from elements of theater, meta-cinema, chamber drama and Porter's own MGM musicals with gratifying -- if deliberately glossy -- results.

Kline opens the picture as a frail but feisty old man (the age makeup is remarkable) who, as he watches his own story unfold, is alternatively tickled ("Oh, look, it's an opening number!"), critical ("He'd never wear that! Change it."), fondly reminiscent and pained by regret. And the actor also plays the younger Porter in the bulk of the picture, which has a merry, dreamlike quality to its stop-and-start interactions with the elderly Porter and his theatrical spirit guide.

Continue reading: De-Lovely Review

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Jonathan Pryce Movies

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

There's a somewhat contrived jauntiness to this blending of fact and fiction that may leave...

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

Charles Dickens might be one of the most legendary authors in history, but it wasn't...

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Listen Up Philip Trailer

Listen Up Philip Trailer

Philip Lewis Friedman is a very successful writer, though not the most likeable of people....

The Salvation Movie Review

The Salvation Movie Review

Just when you thought no one could come up with a fresh take on the...

Woman in Gold Movie Review

Woman in Gold Movie Review

This fascinating true story is strong enough to hold up against the formulaic Hollywood treatment,...

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Woman In Gold - Clips And Trailer

Woman In Gold - Clips And Trailer

When the Nazis took over Vienna prior to the Second World War, they stole countless,...

The Salvation Trailer

The Salvation Trailer

In the 1870s, Danish settlers travelled to the US following a brutal war with Germany....

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Movie Review

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Movie Review

By ignoring everything that made 2009's G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra a hugely entertaining...

Hysteria Movie Review

Hysteria Movie Review

There's probably a fascinating, complex story behind the invention of the vibrator in 19th century...

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer

After the events of the first film, which saw them take on an organisation called...

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra Movie Review

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra Movie Review

Frankly, this is what summer movies should be like. The filmmakers have harvested the coolest...

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