Jonathan Lipnicki

Jonathan Lipnicki

Jonathan Lipnicki Quick Links

News Pictures Film Footage Quotes RSS

Jonathan Lipnicki - 'Boone: The Bounty Hunter' wrap party at The Parlor in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 16th July 2014

Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki

Video - Jonathan Lipnicki Talks Jujitsu And IOS7 At 'The Wizard Of Oz' Hollywood Opening - Part 9


'Jerry Maguire' star Jonathan Lipnicki chats to paparazzi outside the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood during the opening night of the stage production of 'The Wizard Of Oz'. Paparazzi stop him and asked if he has downloaded the iOS7 iPhone update yet, which he confesses he hasn't.

Continue: Video - Jonathan Lipnicki Talks Jujitsu And IOS7 At 'The Wizard Of Oz' Hollywood Opening - Part 9

Jonathan Lipnicki - Los Angeles Opening Night of 'The Wizard Of Oz' - Arrivals - Hollywood, CA, United States - Wednesday 18th September 2013

Jonathan Lipnicki - Celebrity sightings at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood - Hollywood, CA, United States - Wednesday 18th September 2013

Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki

Jonathan Lipnicki Tuesday 12th June 2012 The Friars Club and Friars Foundation honor Tom Cruise with the Entertainment Icon Award

Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki

Jonathan Lipnicki - Izek Shomof, Jonathan Lipnicki Tuesday 5th June 2012 The Los Angeles premiere of 'For The Love Of Money' held at The Writers Guild Theater

Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki
Jonathan Lipnicki

Stuart Little 2 Review


Very Good
The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all, this cuddly sequel to the 1999 hit is a little more visually polished, a little funnier, and a little more madcap. However, given the film's thin little plot and threadbare character development, there also appears to be little reason to make a Stuart sequel, save for lining the pockets of those involved with a little more money.

Little 2 starts off strong enough, reintroducing dad Fredrick (Hugh Laurie), mom Eleanor (Geena Davis), son George (Jonathan Lipnicki), and adopted child Stuart (voice of Michael J. Fox), who's actually a talking mouse. Since last we met the Little clan, the family has added baby girl Martha, which gives Eleanor someone else to dote over besides her pint-sized sons. Speaking of, Stuart's depressed because George is outgrowing the novelty of having a kid brother.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

The Little Vampire Review


Good
Just when you thought movies couldn't get any more ridiculous, along comes a film that poses the question, "Did Dracula ever have a teddy bear?" I'm talking, of course, about The Little Vampire, a movie about a nuclear family of vampires that feed on cows, live in Scotland, and make friends with the little kid from Jerry Maguire.

In The Little Vampire, Jonathan Lipnicki plays Tony Thompson, recent émigré to the Highlands. Rather than go the traditional route for Scottish fantasy and pick up a wooden sword and proclaim, "There can be only one," Tony begins dreaming of vampires. Night after night, Tony's slumber is disturbed as he dreams of a rite being performed by a clan of vampires. What it means, Tony has no clue. So Tony simply does what any other eight-year old stereotyped by cinema does: Goes to mommy (Pamela Gidley) and daddy (Tommy Hinkley), sleeps in their bed for the night, and then gets ridiculed by everyone he knows for his "wild vampire fantasies" during the day.

Continue reading: The Little Vampire Review

Like Mike Review


Weak
A cardboard Cinderella story, involving a pair of magic basketball sneakers and the hopes and dreams of an orphaned black youth, the script for Like Mike is about as challenging as getting tickets for a Wang Chung reunion concert. Calvin Cambridge (Lil' Bow Wow) is a short, pigtailed 14-year-old orphan with high hopes of one day playing with the big boys of the NBA. But his diminutive stature and inability to shoot a fade-away jumper over the orphanage's bully Ox (Jesse Plemmons) dent his dreams of stardom. But, the gods smile upon Calvin after he acquires a mysterious pair of old sneakers inscribed with the faded initials "MJ," which received a jolt of magic lightning one stormy night. Never mind the damning fact that previous owner of the shoes is about six feet, six inches in height.

After lacing up the shoes, Calvin ends up on the court of his favorite team, the Los Angeles Knights during a half-time promo, taking on the Knights' star player Tracey Reynolds (Morris Chestnut) in a bit of one-on-one. With the power of MJ in his soles, Calvin fakes left and ends up hitting a 25-foot jumper and then a devastating slam-dunk that stinks of the power of Flubber. The reactions from a stunned crowd inspire the manager of the Knights, Frank Bernard (Eugene Levy), to sign Calvin to a contract as a publicity stunt, without ever intending the play the lucky whippersnapper. But after Calvin hits the game-winning jumper when the tough-as-nails coach Wagner (Robert Forster) hands him the ball - the evil orphan headmaster Bittleman (Crispin Glover) earns more riches wen Calvin's contract is re-negotiated.

Continue reading: Like Mike Review

Like Mike Review


Good

By all rights, "Like Mike" should be a lousy movie. Designed as a slap-dash kiddie flick, built around a dumb plot device (magic sneakers turn a young orphan into an NBA all-star) and starring a flash-in-the-pan novelty hip-hopper (Lil' Bow Wow), its overall concept is thick with seemingly predictable, third-hand story elements. Will the kid find adoptive parents? Will his team win the big game? Well, duh.

But director John Schultz ("Drive Me Crazy") doesn't use the shoes as a storytelling crutch (they account for about four minutes of the whole movie), he gets charismatic performances from his cast of talented players, and he beats down almost every encroaching cliché, creating in their stead a smart kids' picture of delightful surprises.

Sure, as the film begins street-smart but endearingly sweet 14-year-old Calvin Cambridge (Bow Wow) is living in a laughably diverse group home (his two best friends are a white boy played by "Jerry Maguire's" Jonathan Lipnicki and an Asian girl played by Brenda Song), where he's picked on by a teenage bully and dreams of being adopted. "Parents only want the puppies," he moans.

Continue reading: Like Mike Review

The Little Vampire Review


Terrible

If Jonathan Lipnicki is washed up at 18 and looking back on his career as a button-cute child star, "The Little Vampire" is will very likely be the picture that embarrasses him most.

A quick, sloppy production of a throwaway script about a little boy who befriends a family of bloodsuckers and helps them recover a magic amulet, it suffers from a pungent collective apathy that wafts off the screen from the cast and crew. The little kids in the picture seem like they're just playing vampire in grandma's dusty attic and not really trying to participate in the plot. The grown-ups in the cast (including respectable actors like Richard E. Grant and John Wood) give let's-get-this-over-with performances and most scenes feel like the director didn't say "Cut!" so much as "Oh that's good enough let's just move on."

Lipnicki ("Stuart Little," "Jerry Maguire") plays Tony, a kid from California who has just moved into a small, renovated Scottish castle with his completely vanilla mother (Pamela Gidley) and father (Tommy Hinkley), a golf course designer hired to build new links for a local lord (Wood).

Continue reading: The Little Vampire Review

Stuart Little Review


Weak

Fans of "Stuart Little," the classic E. B. White's children's book about a congenial little mouse with a wind-up red roadster, would be wise to avoid "Stuart Little," the mostly in-name-only big screen adaptation featuring Michael J. Fox's voice emanating from a computer-animated Stuart.

Nearly everything delightful about the book is erased or painted over here with near-plotless kiddie fare, predictably zany adventures and deliberately ham-fisted acting from a wildly talented cast (Geena Davis, Hugh Laurie, Jeffrey Jones, Allyce Beasley, Estelle Getty, Julia Sweeney), entirely wasted on a Saturday morning cartoon script.

Ironically co-written by M. Night Shyamalan (the writer-director of "The Sixth Sense"), the story opens with Mr. and Mrs. Little on their way to an orphanage to pick out a kid for no explored reason. Won over by the home's least likely resident -- a talking mouse named Stuart with a miniature wardrobe and a pithy personality -- they take him home, where his new brother George (Jonathan Lipnicki from "Jerry Maguire") gives him the cold shoulder and the family cat (voiced obnoxiously by Nathan Lane) tries to eat him.

Continue reading: Stuart Little Review

Stuart Little 2 Review


OK

A significant improvement over its plotless, meandering predecessor, "Stuart Little 2" is fun-loving, low calorie, big-city adventure for the seamlessly computer-animated talking mouse with the effervescent voice of Michael J. Fox.

In this sequel the fuzzy, Lilliputian adopted son of the Little clan -- which includes Stuart's human brother (Jonathan Lipnicki) and his silly, sacchariney, storybook-perfect parents (Hugh Laurie and Geena Davis) -- brings home a spirited sweetheart of a canary named Margalo (Melanie Griffith's voice) after rescuing her from a falcon.

When she later disappears -- along with Mrs. Little's wedding ring -- naive, good-hearted Stuart is convinced the falcon has snatched her away and sets out on a rescue mission, dragging along a very reluctant Snowball, the Littles' pampered house cat with the Vaudevillian voice of Nathan Lane.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

Jonathan Lipnicki

Jonathan Lipnicki Quick Links

News Pictures Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Jonathan Lipnicki

Date of birth

22nd October, 1990

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.70




Instagram



Jonathan Lipnicki Movies

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all,...

Advertisement
The Little Vampire Movie Review

The Little Vampire Movie Review

Just when you thought movies couldn't get any more ridiculous, along comes a film that...

Like Mike Movie Review

Like Mike Movie Review

A cardboard Cinderella story, involving a pair of magic basketball sneakers and the hopes and...

Like Mike Movie Review

Like Mike Movie Review

By all rights, "Like Mike" should be a lousy movie. Designed as a slap-dash kiddie...

Advertisement
The Little Vampire Movie Review

The Little Vampire Movie Review

If Jonathan Lipnicki is washed up at 18 and looking back on his career as...

Stuart Little Movie Review

Stuart Little Movie Review

Fans of "Stuart Little," the classic E. B. White's children's book about a congenial little...

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

A significant improvement over its plotless, meandering predecessor, "Stuart Little 2" is fun-loving, low calorie,...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.