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Joy Review

Extraordinary

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro for an offbeat biopic about the woman who invented the Miracle Mop. It's such a quirky movie that it's destined to divide audiences, but there's magic in Russell's loose, inventive filmmaking style. And this lively story has a lot to say about the tenacity required to achieve the American dream.

Joy Mangano (Lawrence) is the only sensible person in her family, so she's been running the household most of her life. But now things are getting a bit too complicated, as her father Rudy (De Niro) moves back into the house after his second marriage fails, Joy's mother Terry (Virginia Madsen) does little but watch her favourite soap opera, Joy's ex-husband Tony (Edgar Ramirez) lives in the basement pursuing his dream of becoming a pop star, and her sister (Dascha Polanco) undermines everything she does. As Joy cares for her own children, it's only her grandmother (Diane Ladd) who has any confidence in her. And when she has a flash of inspiration and creates a self-wringing mop, getting it on the market is an uphill battle. Finally, she catches the attention of Neil (Bradley Cooper), who runs a brand new shopping network called QVC.

The story spans some 40 years, during which Russell gleefully parallels Joy's family chaos with the lurid soap on Terry's television. Of the people around Joy, only Grandma, Tony and her childhood buddy Peggy (Elizabeth Rohm) believe in her. So even though her dad's new girlfriend (the fabulous Isabella Rossellini) invests in her mop, no one thinks she'll achieve any real success. This means that Joy's journey is a series of sometimes outrageous obstacles both within and outside her immediate circle. And of course the biggest barrier is her gender, because almost no one accepts the idea that she might be a genius.

Continue reading: Joy Review

American Hustle Review


Essential

David O. Russell deploys his deranged genius to explore the real events behind Abscam, cleverly focussing on the inter-relationships rather than the details of the elaborate sting operation. So under the wild 1970s hair and costumes, we have a series of characters who are never very likeable but are still hugely engaging. Which makes this one of the most prickly, exhilarating movies of the year.

As the opening caption says, "Some of this actually happened". It's set in 1978 New York, where lowlife conman Irving (Bale) is making a decent living with his girlfriend Sydney (Adams). Although his wife Rosalyn (Lawrence) knows something is up. Things get even more complicated when Irving and Sydney are cornered by FBI agent Richie (Cooper) and forced to co-operate in a complex scam to entrap mobsters and dirty politicians, including the likeable Mayor Polito (Renner), with whom Irving strikes up a friendship. As things develop, the sting continually threatens to spin crazily out of control. And Irving starts to worry that Sydney is getting far too close to Richie.

Intriguingly, even as the story gets more and more insane, Russell keeps the story grounded in the characters and the way they interact with each other. So their shifting relationships, power struggles and internal jealousies take centre stage, blurring the details of the undercover operation into the background. This may annoy viewers who want clear insight into Abscam, but it makes the movie much more involving. And it gives the actors a lot to work with. Each of them delivers a powerhouse performance that blends the character's distinct physicality with a complex inner life.

Continue reading: American Hustle Review

Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon - 2013 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd February 2013

Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon
Bruce Cohen and Joe Gordon
Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon
Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon

Bruce Cohen, Donna Gigliotti and Jonathan Gordon - 2013 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Press Room - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd February 2013

Bruce Cohen, Donna Gigliotti and Jonathan Gordon
Bruce Cohen, Donna Gigliotti and Jonathan Gordon

Donna Gigliotti and Jonathan Gordon - 85th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon Los Angeles California United States Monday 4th February 2013

Donna Gigliotti and Jonathan Gordon

Donna Gigliotti, Jonathan Gordon and Bruce Cohen - Producers Guild Awards Los Angeles California United States Saturday 26th January 2013

Donna Gigliotti, Jonathan Gordon and Bruce Cohen
Donna Gigliotti, Jonathan Gordon and Bruce Cohen
Donna Gigliotti, Jonathan Gordon and Bruce Cohen

Director David O. Russell; Bruce Cohen; Jonathan Gordon BAFTA Los Angeles 2013 Awards Season Tea Party held at the Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles Featuring: Director David O. Russell, Bruce Cohen, Jonathan Gordon Where: Beverly Hills, California, United States When: 12 Jan 2013

Director David O. Russell, Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon
Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon

Silver Linings Playbook Review


Excellent

Writer-director David O. Russell's out-of-control filmmaking style is perfectly suited to a romantic-comedy involving mental illness, and he infuses the film with a sparky unpredictability that's echoed in the perfectly graded performances of the entire cast. Cleverly, even though most of the characters are clinically unhinged, they're all likeable and easy to identify with.

Cooper stars as Pat, who has spent eight months in a mental hospital before his mother (Weaver) comes to take him home early. His dad (De Niro) isn't so sure it's a good idea, but everyone's happy to have him home. And since he finally accepts that he's bipolar, Pat is ready to get on with life. But it's not so easy. He's prevented from reuniting with his wife because of a restraining order, so he visits mutual friends (Stiles and Ortiz) instead. And they set him up with Tiffany (Lawrence), who's psychologically damaged in her own way. Recognising similar needs, they agree to help each other.

Yes, the film has a clear rom-com premise, but the characters are so unpredictable that we are never quite sure what they'll say or do next. And it's not like Pat and Tiffany are the only unstable people here: they're just the only ones with official diagnoses. All of which gives the actors almost too much colourful material to work with. Cooper is a likeable, charming presence at the centre, eliciting our sympathy even when he does something stupid. And Lawrence delivers a full-on performance that often takes our breath away with its clever layering.

Continue reading: Silver Linings Playbook Review

Red State Review


Excellent
Smith departs from his usual sunny-silly style for this grim, unsettling thriller, which explores the terror of intolerance and the dangers of political power. Intriguingly, the film also continues his exploration of religion (see Dogma).

Three high school students (Angarano, Gallner and Braun) use a phone app to find a 38-year-old woman (Leo) who wants to have group sex. But she's just bait. Before they know what happened, they're caged in an isolated church, where the activist pastor (Parks) explains why he's decided to take violent action against immoral society, which he blames on homosexuality. But the situation devolves into a Waco-style armed stand-off between the militant church and an ATF agent (Goodman) and his team.

Continue reading: Red State Review

Hotel For Dogs Review


Weak
Recently, film critic Roger Ebert has been bemoaning the fact that even bad movies look good. If he were putting together a list of such flicks, Hotel for Dogs would surely make the top five. It looks great. And it's bad. Really bad.

Hotel for Dogs clearly wants to rank alongside films such as Anna to the Infinite Power, The Goonies, E.T., and Radio Flyer, films that balanced lighthearted playfulness with a darker, grittier reality. Like the recent Spiderwick Chronicles, Hotel for Dogs plays all the same Spielberg/Donner riffs (a cast of doe-eyed youngsters wise beyond their years dressed in corduroy and plaid, moments of adult menace cut with "oh, thank goodness" relief) and even apes the look of these early '80s flicks. Yet for all its nostalgic bravado, the film never feels more than surface, more than flash.

Continue reading: Hotel For Dogs Review

Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One Review


Very Good
William Greaves had some brass balls in making the obliquely-titled Symbiopyschotaxiplasm, namely by auditioning a bunch of film students and hiring a bunch of crew members for a movie that didn't exist. He then proceeded to screw with their heads, mixing things up on them and otherwise making life miserable, while filming everything that went on behind the scenes (rehearsals, complaining, homeless people interviewed). It's too bad that the film's production values scrape rock bottom -- even by low budget standards. Much of the movie is inaudible, and the scratched up film stock gives you a headache from the get-go. The editing is also surprisingly quite poor, considering how much of this experimental film hinges upon the way it is put together.

Continue reading: Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One Review

Derailed Review


Weak
During a recent interview, Derailed star Jennifer Aniston admitted that a close friend figured out the movie's driving twist after watching the trailer. Was the comment high praise for her pal's psychic abilities or a none-too-subtle dig at the obviousness of the linear plot?

Sadly, it's the latter. Derailed opens with a tantalizing scenario that threatens to go down a host of intriguing avenues until novelist James Siegel and screenwriter Stuart Beattie opt for the obvious paths. Note to savvy readers: If you suspect someone is in cahoots with the movie's main killer, you're right. They are. Except for that one guy, who actually does die, though you'd be willing to wager $100 he'll turn up again in the end. He doesn't.

Continue reading: Derailed Review

Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One Review


OK
William Greaves had some brass balls in making the obliquely-titled Symbiopyschotaxiplasm, namely by auditioning a bunch of film students and hiring a bunch of crew for a movie that didn't exist. He then proceeded to screw with their heads, mixing things up on them and otherwise making life miserable, while filming everything that went on behind the scenes. It's too bad that the film's production values scrape rock bottom -- even by low budget standards. Much of the movie is inaudible, and the scratched up film stock gives you a headache from the get-go. The editing is also pretty poor. Good idea, bad execution.
Jonathan Gordon

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Jonathan Gordon Movies

Joy Movie Review

Joy Movie Review

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer...

American Hustle Movie Review

American Hustle Movie Review

David O. Russell deploys his deranged genius to explore the real events behind Abscam, cleverly...

Silver Linings Playbook Movie Review

Silver Linings Playbook Movie Review

Writer-director David O. Russell's out-of-control filmmaking style is perfectly suited to a romantic-comedy involving mental...

Red State Movie Review

Red State Movie Review

Smith departs from his usual sunny-silly style for this grim, unsettling thriller, which explores the...

Advertisement
Hotel for Dogs Movie Review

Hotel for Dogs Movie Review

Recently, film critic Roger Ebert has been bemoaning the fact that even bad movies look...

Derailed Movie Review

Derailed Movie Review

During a recent interview, Derailed star Jennifer Aniston admitted that a close friend figured out...

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