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Free State Of Jones Review

Good

Since its true story is still so timely after some 150 years, we can forgive this film for being somewhat dull in the way the events are recounted. Solid acting helps give the characters some soulfulness, and the issues are things society is still grappling with. Writer-director Gary Ross (The Hunger Games) may struggle to maintain the momentum of the story with his fragmented script, but he recreates the period beautifully and makes sure that the ideas resonate.

It's set in 1862 Mississippi, as the American Civil War is in full force and medic Newton Knight (Matthew McConaughey) finds it increasingly difficult to serve in the Confederate Army. In addition to the rampant racism, he realises that this is little more than a class war: poor men fighting to help the rich maintain their wealth. So he abandons his post and returns home, where he assembles a ragtag militia from escaped slaves and deserters. Together, they claim that Jones County is a free state. Their battles with military forces and angry locals continue long after the war ends. But Newton and his second wife Rachel (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) keep fighting against the state's blatantly racist laws.

This story is intercut with another series of events 75 years later, as a descendant of Newton and Rachel fights a courtroom battle in which he's criminally charged with marrying a white woman, even though he's only one-eighth black. This sideroad has nothing to do with Newton's story, other than to connect it loosely to America's civil rights protests in the 1960s, so it drastically slows down the entire movie. There's a lot happening with Newton, but filmmaker Ross never quite lets a scene build up some momentum before cutting away to something else.

Continue reading: Free State Of Jones Review

Jon Kilik , Wesley Snipes - New York Premiere of 'Chi-Raq' at The Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theatre - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 1st December 2015

Jon Kilik and Wesley Snipes
Jon Kilik and Father Michael Pfleger
Jon Kilik

Jon Kilik - LA Premiere of THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY - PART 2 at Microsoft Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 16th November 2015

Jon Kilik

Francis Lawrence, Jon Kilik, Nina Jacobson, Jena Malone, Liam Hemsworth, Jennifer Lawrence, Willow Shields, Josh Hutcherson, Sam Claflin, Michelle Forbes, Natalie Dormer, Elizabeth Banks, Julianne Moore, Stanley Tucci , Donald Sutherland - World premiere of 'Die Tribute von Panem - Mockingjay Teil 2 (The Hunger Games - Mockingjay Part 2)' at Cinestar am Potsdamer Platz movie theater. at Cinestar am Potsdamer Platz movie theater - Berlin, Germany - Wednesday 4th November 2015

Francis Lawrence, Jon Kilik, Nina Jacobson, Jena Malone, Liam Hemsworth, Jennifer Lawrence, Willow Shields, Josh Hutcherson, Sam Claflin, Michelle Forbes, Natalie Dormer, Elizabeth Banks, Julianne Moore, Stanley Tucci and Donald Sutherland
Francis Lawrence
Francis Lawrence
Francis Lawrence
Francis Lawrence
Francis Lawrence

Foxcatcher Review


Excellent

Director Bennett Miller continues to skilfully probe around the edges of true stories with this follow-up to Capote and Moneyball, although this is a much, much darker tale. Actually, it's such an unnerving series of events that it's not easy to watch, and its characters aren't easy to like. But it's so expertly shot and edited, with startlingly full-on performances from the entire cast, that it can't help but get under the skin and chill us to the bone.

It opens after the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, where Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) and and his big brother David (Mark Ruffalo) both won gold medals for wrestling. But they need help with funding to train for Seoul 1988, and Mark gets a remarkable offer from billionaire John du Pont (Steve Carell) to start a wrestling team at his vast Foxcatcher estate in New England, which is known for the thoroughbred horses managed by John's imperious mother Jean (Vanessa Redgrave). Aside from wanting to stay home with his wife (Sienna Miller) and kids, David doesn't trust John, so Mark heads to Foxcatcher on his own. But John's obsession knows no bounds, and soon he lures David and family to join them.

Initially, John's interest in wrestling feels like a mere eccentricity, a way of creating a team of "thoroughbreds" to rival his mother's prize-winning horses. But Carell cleverly plays the role with an insinuating glint that makes us wonder what he's up to, and his wrestlers see it too, going along with his nutty plans simply because the money is so good. Then the squirm-inducing twists and turns start, as John introduces Mark to cocaine and everything starts to spiral out of control. Nearly unrecognisable with a prosthetic hook nose, Carell is genuinely terrifying because his performance burns so slowly.

Continue reading: Foxcatcher Review

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 Review


Excellent

This four-part franchise, based on the Suzanne Collins novels, turns very dark with this strikingly bold third film, which once again makes the most of perspective to recount a parable about normal people rising up against oppression. This may be a sci-fi apocalypse, but the story is packed with present-day resonance and messy characters who are sometimes unnervingly easy to identify with. So while things get very grim in this chapter, it's still a hugely engaging film, packed with real-life humour and emotion. And it makes Mockingjay Part 2 unmissable.

The story picks up not long after the chaos of the Quarter Quell, when Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) realised that she had been a pawn for a planned revolution that cast her as the iconic Mockingjay. Now in hiding, the rebels need her to assume the role publicly, but she has other concerns. So she makes a deal with rebel President Coin (Julianne Moore) and her sidekick Plutarch (Philip Seymour Hoffman) that she'll help them if they guarantee safety for the captured Peeta (Josh Hutcherson), who has apparently been brainwashed so he can be used for propaganda purposes by the Capitol's President Snow (Donald Sutherland). Working with her old hunting buddy Gale (Liam Hemsworth), Katniss takes on the Mockingjay role, locking horns with Snow as the rebellion grows in strength.

Once again, director Francis Lawrence vividly tells the story from Katniss' imperfect point of view. This is a teen consumed with anger and confusion, and she can't figure out why she's so inspiring to everyone who looks at her. But she's beginning to understand her impact and how she can use it to help the people she loves. This makes her heroism remarkably human, rather than the usual noble movie self-sacrifice. And Jennifer Lawrence brings so much depth to Katniss that the character transcends even the most jarring plot points. Her internal journey also makes this much more than yet another dystopian teen adventure.

Continue reading: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 Review

Jon Kilik - "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1" Los Angeles Premiere held at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 18th November 2014

Jon Kilik

Jon Kilik - World premiere of 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

Jon Kilik
Jon Kilik

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Review


Extraordinary

After 2012's The Hunger Games caught us off-guard with its subtle themes, this sequel more than lives up to the hype, dramatically expanding the scale of the action while letting the actors deepen their characters. It's a full-on action epic that cleverly retains author Suzanne Collins' narrative trick of telling the story through a flawed perspective. And it provides the needed push to give the whole saga real momentum.

We join our heroes not long after the last film ended: Katniss and Peeta (Lawrence and Hutcherson) are in trouble for challenging the authority of President Snow (Sutherland) and sowing the seeds of rebellion in the districts. Now they have to travel around the nation with their team - drunken mentor Haymitch (Harrelson), preening manager Effie (Banks), quietly subversive designer Cinna (Kravitz) - soothing ruffled feathers. But of course they only make things worse. So new Gamesmaker Plutarch (Hoffman) plots a way to force them back into the games with all of the past victors, so they can be wiped out for good. And Katniss is so busy worrying about protecting Peeta that she fails to remember who the true enemy is.

Screenwriters Beaufoy and deBruyn (aka Oscar-winner Michael Arndt) inventively maintain Katniss' narrow, inaccurate point-of-view right through the film, which keeps the audience wrong-footed all the way to the end. It's an exhilarating trick that makes the tour of the districts painfully dull and the return to the games utterly horrifying. It also gives Lawrence the chance to flex her own Oscar-winning chops, further tormenting us with her inability to choose between two good men: Peeta and Gale (Hemsworth), her pal back home. She certainly doesn't trust newcomers like the mouthy Johanna (Malone) or the too-hunky Finnick (Claflin).

Continue reading: The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Review

The Hunger Games Review


Excellent
Proclaimed "the next big franchise" before production even began, this first chapter of Suzanne Collins' trilogy manages to live up to the hype. It's rare to see a blockbuster with such a sharp political sensibility. And the actors are terrific in complex roles.

In what was once North America, the ruling class demands an annual sacrifice of the 12 districts that once rebelled: each must select two teens, a boy and a girl, to battle in a wooded arena to the death, with the last one standing crowned victor. In the poor mining District 12, the tributes are ace archer Katniss (Lawrence) and muscly baker Peeta (Hutcherson), who forge an awkward friendship as they're thrust into the televised competition. Trained by Haymitch (Harrelson), promoted by Effie (Banks), groomed by Cinna (Kravitz), interviewed by Caesar (Tucci) - it's simply overwhelming.

Continue reading: The Hunger Games Review

Alexander Review


Terrible
To paraphrase the obnoxious David Spade, I liked Alexander a lot... when it was called Troy.

In fact, Oliver Stone's overblown biopic detailing the global conquests of Alexander the Great (Colin Farrell) would make a nice bookend to Wolfgang Petersen's lopsided sword-and-sandal epic. One day you'll be able to tap Netflix for the two titles and combine them for a battle-worthy double feature. You'll only need an entire weekend to wrap it up.

Continue reading: Alexander Review

Babel Review


Weak
The Bible gives us the story of the tower of Babel, the magnificently tall structure whose height was deemed offensive and impertinent by God. To punish humanity for its architectural hubris, God then decided to drive a linguistic wedge between the nations of the world, who until then had spoken the same tongue. As fables go, this is a particularly effective one in that it both illustrates a moral -- don't think you're better than God or you shall be struck down with all speed -- and also provides a handy answer to those who wondered why there are so many different languages anyway.

In Babel, directed and co-written by Alejandro González Iñárritu (21 Grams, Amores Perros), a clutch of characters from a range of cultures and walks of life attempt to build a towering film of meaning from coincidence and portent; unfortunately, in the end it is the viewer who is punished for the filmmaker's hubris.

Continue reading: Babel Review

Babel Review


Weak
The Bible gives us the story of the tower of Babel, the magnificently tall structure whose height was deemed offensive and impertinent by God. To punish humanity for its architectural hubris, God then decided to drive a linguistic wedge between the nations of the world, who until then had spoken the same tongue. As fables go, this is a particularly effective one in that it both illustrates a moral - don't think you're better than God or you shall be struck down with all speed - and also provides a handy answer to those who wondered why there are so many different languages anyway.

In Babel, directed and co-written by Alejandro González Iñárritu (21 Grams, Amores Perros), a clutch of characters from a range of cultures and walks of life attempt to build a towering film of meaning from coincidence and portent; unfortunately, in the end it is the viewer who is punished for the filmmaker's hubris.

Continue reading: Babel Review

Pleasantville Review


Extraordinary
Not only does Pleasantville have more CGI effects than Titanic, it has more plot, better characters, and a more satisfying ending, too. Will it create the same kind of waves that the big boat did a year ago? Hardly, but discerning viewers not overcome by hype (see also The Truman Show) will probably agree with me that Pleasantvilleis truly one of the best films of the year.

Whereas Truman brought TV to a man's life, Pleasantvillebrings two teenagers to a TV show. Hasn't this been done? Well, yes, in a real stinker called Stay Tuned (1992, with John Ritter and Pam Dawber), but hopefully the dismal idiocy of that film won't color (so to speak) your judgement on this one. The plot really can't be condensed into a "TV Guide"-style logline, which means it requires a little thought to get into, but that really only enhances the moviegoing experience.

Continue reading: Pleasantville Review

Bamboozled Review


Very Good
Welcome to a piece of American history. In the old music hall, white comedians and song 'n' dance men would splash their faces in charcoal, maybe throw on a pair of white gloves, then go through the step-n-fetchin' routine, the exotica and the buffoonery of perceived black culture. Jim Crow, Amos 'n' Andy, Mammy, L'il Black Sambo, Uncle Tom, and the Ten Pickaninnies were typical characters thrown on stage and screen for the amusement and mockery of white audiences.

What began as white actors in blackface evolved with the 1950s Amos and Andy Show on television, featuring black actors in blackface. The content remained the same, with Amos and Andy portrayed as lazy, ignorant, chicken eatin', banjo playin', shifty clowns. Once the show lost favor with an outraged public, the television studios put a halt on developing new shows about the black experience -- degrading or otherwise -- for several decades.

Continue reading: Bamboozled Review

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Lana Del Rey Has The World In 'Love' With Her New Single

Lana Del Rey Has The World In 'Love' With Her New Single

The singer releases her new album later this year.

Jon Kilik Movies

Free State of Jones Movie Review

Free State of Jones Movie Review

Since its true story is still so timely after some 150 years, we can forgive...

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Movie Review

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Movie Review

Suzanne Collins' saga comes to a suitably epic conclusion in a climactic series of battles...

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Director Bennett Miller continues to skilfully probe around the edges of true stories with this...

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 Movie Review

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 Movie Review

This four-part franchise, based on the Suzanne Collins novels, turns very dark with this strikingly...

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Movie Review

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Movie Review

After 2012's The Hunger Games caught us off-guard with its subtle themes, this sequel more...

The Hunger Games Movie Review

The Hunger Games Movie Review

Proclaimed "the next big franchise" before production even began, this first chapter of Suzanne Collins'...

Biutiful Movie Review

Biutiful Movie Review

While this gentle drama about a man trying to prepare his family for his own...

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Miral Movie Review

Miral Movie Review

Inventive camerawork and raw performances bring this powerful true story to vivid life. So it's...

Miracle at St. Anna Movie Review

Miracle at St. Anna Movie Review

Spike Lee's latest joint disappoints. It opens in the late 1980s with a literal bang,...

Lou Reed's Berlin Movie Review

Lou Reed's Berlin Movie Review

As the terms and bylaws that differentiate television and film continue to erode, the basic...

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly Movie Review

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly Movie Review

Jean-Dominique Bauby, Jean-Do to his loved ones, was an editor for the Parisian branch of...

Alexander Movie Review

Alexander Movie Review

To paraphrase the obnoxious David Spade, I liked Alexander a lot... when it was called...

Babel Movie Review

Babel Movie Review

The Bible gives us the story of the tower of Babel, the magnificently tall structure...

Babel Movie Review

Babel Movie Review

The Bible gives us the story of the tower of Babel, the magnificently tall structure...

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