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Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83


Anita Ekberg Lauren Bacall John Wayne

Anita Ekberg, the actress who danced in the Fontana di Trevi in Federico Fellini’s film “La Dolce Vita,” has died at the age of 83. Ekberg had been hospitalized recently after a series of illnesses, her lawyer, Patrizia Ubaldi told the Associated Press. She died at the Rocca di Papa Hospital in Rome.

Continue reading: Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83

Maureen O’Hara To Receive Honorary Oscar


John Wayne

It’s been a long time coming, but legendary actress Maureen O’Hara will finally receive her first Oscar today, at the academy’s Governors Awards ceremony. The 94 year old actress is being honoured for her lengthly film career which began in 1938.

Maureen O'HaraScreen legend Maureen O'Hara

Born in Dublin, O’Hara went on to star in more than 60 films, acting up until 2000 when her final movie, The Last Dance was completed.

Continue reading: Maureen O’Hara To Receive Honorary Oscar

John Wayne's Heirs Sue University Over "The Duke" Alcohol Products


John Wayne

The family of actor John Wayne is suing Duke University over the use of the actor's nickname, "The Duke," in a trademark for alcoholic drinks. John Wayne Enterprises, which is run by the Wayne family, filed for a trademark application last year to use the word on alcoholic drink labels, except for beer, according to USA Today.

Wayne's heirs are taking the university to court over the family's right to market bottles of bourbon branded with the late movie star's nickname, Duke, which was given to the actor when he was growing up.

Although both parties hold trademarks for the name, the university has argued that allowing the Wayne estate to use the name could cause confusion and "diminish, dilute and tarnish" the name's value.

Continue reading: John Wayne's Heirs Sue University Over "The Duke" Alcohol Products

The Mandela Family Honored At The John Wayne Cancer Institute Auxiliary's 29th Annual Odyssey Ball

David Manaway, Zaziwe Dliamini-Manaway and Zwati Dlamini - The Mandela Family honored at The John Wayne Cancer Institute Auxiliary's 29th Annual Odyssey Ball at Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 5th April 2014

John Wayne, David Manaway, Zaziwe Dliamini-manaway and Zwati Dlamini
John Wayne, Zaziwe Dliamini-manaway and Jr Martines
John Wayne, Zaziwe Dliamini-manaway, Anita Swift and Zwati Dlamini
John Wayne and Jr Martines
John Wayne, Zaziwe Dliamini-manaway and Zwati Dlamini
John Wayne, Zaziwe Dliamini-manaway, Dr. Lawrence Piro and Zwati Dlamini

The Grossman Burn Foundation's 'Art Of Humanity' Gala Held At The SLS Hotel

John Wayne - Patrick John Wayne Los Angeles, California - The Grossman Burn Foundation's 'Art Of Humanity' Gala held at the SLS hotel Friday 8th October 2010

John Wayne
John Wayne and Jack Scalia
John Wayne
John Wayne
John Wayne
John Wayne

El Dorado Review


Extraordinary
Howard Hawks's penultimate film is a canny reshuffling of his own Rio Bravo as he performs a loose and extended mediation on his favorite themes of loyalty and professionalism.

John Wayne plays Cole Thornton, a gun for hire claiming a job with a land-grabbing cattle baron (Ed Asner). Cole accepts the job until he finds out that his old pal J.P. Harrah (Robert Mitchum, in one of his finest late career performances) is the town sheriff. Cole switches sides but not before being shot by a put-upon rancher's daughter, Joey (Michele Carey), who thinks Cole is still working for Jason. With the bullet lodged near his spine, Cole rejects a risky operation and leaves town looking for work. A year later, Cole returns to town with a young, firebrand partner, Mississippi (James Caan), in tow to find that Jason has hired a legendary gang of gunslingers to force Joey's family off their ranch. Cole also discovers J.P. has deteriorated into a pathetic joke of a drunk after being thrown over by a dame (and Mitchum is not short of harrowing in his efforts to fight back his demons). But Jason's hired guns won't quit, so Cole along with Mississippi and J.P.'s obnoxious deputy Bull (Arthur Hunnicutt) try to head off the gang of hired guns. At the same time, Cole helps J.P. to pull out of his drunken stupor and regain his professionalism.

Continue reading: El Dorado Review

The John Wayne Cancer Institute Honors James Caan

Patricia Kara and John Wayne Saturday 22nd November 2008 The John Wayne cancer institute honors James Caan Los Angeles, California

Patricia Kara and John Wayne
Patricia Kara and John Wayne
Patricia Kara and John Wayne
Patricia Kara and John Wayne
Patricia Kara and John Wayne

They Were Expendable Review


Unbearable
One of the worst war movies ever made, They Were Expendable tells the oh-so-serious tale of PT boats during WWII. Set in 1941 (and released in 1945, when the war was still going on!), we are treated to John Wayne's perfunctory performance as he ties up boats and unties them, then gets in a bunch of battles before having to tie up some more boats. Interminably long, the film is nearly unwatchable and offers nothing new in the way of war (or anti-war) commentary. Sure, the lowly PT boatmen weren't expendable, but their movie is.

Continue reading: They Were Expendable Review

The Searchers Review


Essential
When Orson Welles was asked by an interviewer who he thought were the top three American directors of all time, he simply said: "John Ford, John Ford, and John Ford." If that wasn't enough, Ingmar Bergman and Akira Kurosawa simply called Ford the best director who ever lived, American or other. However, if you were to ask most film students who directed My Darling Clementine, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and The Searchers, they'd stare at you as if you asked them who was the father of tap dancing (sorry, Bojangles). Truth be told, there is a certain anti-patriotism going on in modern cinema studies, and don't get me started on the current attitude towards Westerns (most find them boring or overly chauvinistic). It doesn't matter what your attitude is; the minute The Searchers begins, it's impossible to look away.

In rural Texas, Ethan Edwards (the immortal John Wayne) returns from the Civil War, where he fought for the Confederacy. His brother and his family welcome him home, but it's obvious that there are problems between the brothers, especially when Ethan is introduced to his adopted nephew, Martin (Jeffrey Hunter), who is part Indian. While out one day, Martin and Ethan trade barbs that bring out Ethan's chilling racism, but that dissipates when they return home to find the brother's house burned down, most dead, and the two girls, Lucy and Debbie, missing. Ethan and Martin quickly find Lucy, raped and murdered, and set out to find Debbie. While they are searching, Martin falls for Laurie (Vera Miles), a white girl whose family offers them a place for the night.

Continue reading: The Searchers Review

Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

Continue reading: Fort Apache Review

Stagecoach Review


Good
Stagecoach is the archetypical Western -- a stagecoach full of crazies has to make it through Indian country in one piece. Though it was his 80th film (of nearly 200), Stagecoach made John Wayne into the superstar he eventually became. Mitchell won Best Supporting Actor for his role as the drunken Doc Boone, and the rest of the cast, notably Trevor as a hooker being run out of town, are memorable. The film has some amazing gaffes, including guns that kick but don't actually go "bang" and, again most notably, one rear-projected shot from the stagecoach where the Indian outside is riding the wrong way. Classic, yet hopelessly dated.

Continue reading: Stagecoach Review

The Searchers Review


Essential
When Orson Welles was asked by an interviewer who he thought were the top three American directors of all time, he simply said: "John Ford, John Ford, and John Ford." If that wasn't enough, Ingmar Bergman and Akira Kurosawa simply called Ford the best director who ever lived, American or other. However, if you were to ask most film students who directed My Darling Clementine, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and The Searchers, they'd stare at you as if you asked them who was the father of tap dancing (sorry, Bojangles). Truth be told, there is a certain anti-patriotism going on in modern cinema studies, and don't get me started on the current attitude towards Westerns (most find them boring or overly chauvinistic). It doesn't matter what your attitude is; the minute The Searchers begins, it's impossible to look away.

In rural Texas, Ethan Edwards (the immortal John Wayne) returns from the Civil War, where he fought for the Confederacy. His brother and his family welcome him home, but it's obvious that there are problems between the brothers, especially when Ethan is introduced to his adopted nephew, Martin (Jeffrey Hunter), who is part Indian. While out one day, Martin and Ethan trade barbs that bring out Ethan's chilling racism, but that dissipates when they return home to find the brother's house burned down, most dead, and the two girls, Lucy and Debbie, missing. Ethan and Martin quickly find Lucy, raped and murdered, and set out to find Debbie. While they are searching, Martin falls for Laurie (Vera Miles), a white girl whose family offers them a place for the night.

Continue reading: The Searchers Review

Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

Continue reading: Fort Apache Review

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