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John Turturro, Danny Aiello and Directors Guild Of America - John Turturro, Joie Lee, composer Bill Lee, Danny Aiello,Samuel L. Jackson, Ruby Dee Davis and director Spike Lee New York City, USA - attend the 20th Anniversary Screening of 'Do The Right Thing' at Directors Guild of America Theater Monday 29th June 2009

John Turturro, Danny Aiello and Directors Guild Of America
John Turturro and Directors Guild Of America

John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square Monday 15th June 2009 UK film premiere of 'Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen' held at the Odeon Leicester Square London, England

John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square

John Turturro Wednesday 6th August 2008 New York Premiere of 'Vicky Cristina Barcelona' at Cinema 2 - Outside Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Wednesday 6th August 2008 New York Premiere of 'Vicky Cristina Barcelona' at Cinema 2 - Inside Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Wednesday 4th June 2008 New York Premiere of 'You Don't Mess with the Zohan' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Sunday 30th September 2007 Premiere screening of John Turturro's 2005 movie 'Romance and Cigarettes' at the Clearview Chelsea West Cinema New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Thursday 30th August 2007 New York Premiere of 'Romance & Cigarettes' at Clearview Chelsea West Cinema New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Monday 25th June 2007 New York Premiere of 'Rescue Dawn' New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

The Good Shepherd Review


Excellent
Starting in the hot mess of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, reaching back to the 1930s and then hopscotching back and forth between those dates whenever the mood strikes it, the pleasingly complex espionage epic The Good Shepherd tries to tell the story of the birth, rise, and (in a sense) death of the Central Intelligence Agency through the fictional composite character Edward Wilson (Matt Damon). It's a monumental piece of history to bite off, but Eric Roth's ambitious, multilayered script certainly makes a good attempt at digesting it for us.

While the CIA's roots in the WWII-era OSS (Office of Strategic Services) are well established, very few films have rooted the American spy service as firmly as this one does in its starched, prim and proper WASP world. Wilson, played by Damon as a tight-lipped, practically invisible cipher, comes from one of that world's better families, and so is a shoo-in for Yale's secret Skull & Bones society once he does a little snooping for the FBI on his pro-Nazi poetry professor (Michael Gambon). Smart and stoic, Wilson shoots up the OSS ranks and soon is masterminding the CIA's global subterfuge against the Soviets.

Continue reading: The Good Shepherd Review

Quiz Show Review


Very Good
People have tried to peg the "end of American innocence" on all sorts of things -- Vietnam, Watergate, the nuclear arms race -- but Robert Redford is, I believe, the first and only person to blame the decline of western civilization on the 21 game show scandal of the 1950s. But there you have it: A curious incident from the past -- and an inevitability, really -- in which upstanding blueblood Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes in a very memorable role) gets caught up in a fixed game show, bringing the show and its producers (but ultimately, no one else) to its knees. Strangely, for such a buildup -- and Redford manages to build quite a snowball of drama in all of this, full of heroes and antiheroes -- the payoff is a real letdown. America survived the quiz show scandals, and trying to overblow the impact of what amounts to a novelty investigation rings a little bit false.

To Live And Die In L.A. Review


Good
Tough as nails cop drama has an on-the-edge cop (Petersen) doing anything he can to take down the counterfeiter (Dafoe) who killed his partner. Extremely bloody and gruesome, To Live and Die in L.A. shows exactly how painful it can be to get shot, butchered, and burned alive. In other words, there's a whole lot more dying than living going on here... Music by none other than Wang Chung.

Unstrung Heroes Review


Excellent
Diane Keaton's directorial feature film debut is a very impressive one. Unstrung Heroes is a smart, bittersweet drama about a boy growing up in postwar suburbia. 12-year old Steven Lidz (Nathan Watt) is surrounded by his inventor father (John Turturro) and nearly-insane uncles Danny and Arthur (Seinfeld's Michael Richards and Maury Chaykin). When his mother Selma (Andie McDowell) develops cancer from her chain smoking, Steven's life begins to slowly unravel.

The pressures of Selma's illness take their toll on everyone, and Steven becomes lost in the cyclone of anger and sorrow that accompanies any tragedy like this. To find peace, Steven runs away to stay with his uncles, where he finds a new world of self-realization, living on his own terms instead of the indifferent rules set down by his father and by society.

Continue reading: Unstrung Heroes Review

Clockers Review


Weak
After the first 2 minutes of Clockers, during which a parade of bloody crime scene photos are splashed on the screen, you'll be ready to put down your popcorn. After the first 15 minutes, you'll be bored enough to go buy some more.

You can't imagine how sick and tired I was of hearing the hype surrounding Clockers, Spike Lee's latest film about (surprise!) African-Americans in Brooklyn who get into trouble with drugs, murder, and betrayal. Every other critic on the planet will probably say they love Clockers so as not to appear uncool. I'll give it to you straight.

Continue reading: Clockers Review

All Revved Up Review


Bad
What are John Turturro and Lili Taylor doing in a movie with race cars on the video cover -- a movie called All Revved Up?

Beats the crap outta me. I suffered through the 83 minutes of Revved and am no closer to figuring out why it was made, what attracted its stars to the project, or even what the hell it was supposed to be about.

Continue reading: All Revved Up Review

Secret Window Review


Weak
Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden), shares a striking resemblance to one of King's best films, Misery. This time around, the writer is held captive in his own home by an obsessed fan who insists he rewrite the ending to one of his novels. Sound familiar? After Window's first few scenes, it seems the film is destined to be a remix of its predecessor. Yet, what we ultimately receive in Window is a clear disappointment, not because it follows a familiar formula, but because it lacks the suspense and action so prevalent in King's novels.

The fan, John Shooter (John Turturro), believes novelist Mort Rainey (Johnny Depp) has plagiarized one of his novels. Shooter shows up at Rainey's rustic, upstate New York cabin ready to inflict whatever force necessary on Rainey until he admits to copying Shooter's work. Rainey is completely unprepared to deal with the situation. Rainey is struggling to come up with an idea for his latest novel and is dealing with the pain of his pending divorce to wife Amy (Maria Bello). When bad things start happening, Rainey immediately suspects Amy's home-wrecking boyfriend Ted (Timothy Hutton) could be the mastermind behind the madness. Rainey hires a private investigator (Charles S. Dutton) to sniff around the town, patrol his cabin at night, and conduct the investigative work Rainey himself is too lazy to do.

Continue reading: Secret Window Review

Miller's Crossing Review


Good
The Coen brothers went all Clockwork Orangey in their most violent but least ironic picture, Miller's Crossing. It's a relatively run of the mill gangster thriller, though oddly the film has found an intensely loyal audience. (Many even consider it to be the best of the Coens' films.) The story follows a Prohibition era crime boss's aide (Gabriel Byrne), who finds himself trying to keep the peace between his boss and a warring faction. He loves his boss's gal, too.

Continue reading: Miller's Crossing Review

Illuminata Review


Weak
The art of acting is fascinating and mysterious, even for the actors who practice it. Unfortunately, for many artists, acting is too fascinating, and they can't resist the temptation to over-analyze it and to make plays/films about it. Playwright Brandon Cole and actor-director John Turturro, creators of Illuminata, are the latest to succumb.

Turturro plays a dramatist, Tuccio, struggling to make his name in the Manhattan theater scene at the turn of the century. Tuccio uses the unexpected illness of an actor (played by Matthew Sussman) to convince the owners of a Manhattan theater to chance his play, Illuminata. Unfortunately, that is not only the movie's premise, but also most of the plot.

Continue reading: Illuminata Review

Rounders Review


Excellent
Eighty bucks. That's about how much money I've lost playing poker since I saw Rounders. Not that this statistic is an inherently bad sign for the movie or anything. In fact, the fact that I was so motivated by the movie to put all that money on the table speaks positively of the picture.

Rounders (the name is short-hand for people who make their living playing poker) stars Matt Damon and Edward Norton as poker playing buddies going in different directions. Damon, after losing a very big money hand, has given up his cardsharping ways for law school and a career as a lawyer. Norton, on the other hand, just out of prison, is eager to build a new bankroll at the tables. As you might expect, for a number of reasons, Damon cannot stay away from the table forever, and consequently his budding law career and relationship with newcomer Gretchen Mol are both put in peril. The trouble Norton's character (not so subtly nicknamed "Worm") gets into does nothing to make Damon's life easier.

Continue reading: Rounders Review

She Hate Me Review


Weak
She Hate Me borrows its title from "He Hate Me," a.k.a. Rod Smart of the XFL (the now-defunct WWE-sponsored extreme football league), but just as this pointless non-sequitur of a title has nothing to do with the film it adorns, Spike Lee's latest tosses together largely unrelated social commentary, broad humor, and nonsensical racial and sexual stereotypes in a vain attempt to critique modern-day romance and big business. Beginning with close-ups of billowing U.S. currency which culminate in the image of a George W. Bush-decorated three-dollar bill, and ending with a goofy "go forth and procreate, young man" rallying cry for its whorish African-American protagonist, the film is structured like a series of punch lines aimed squarely at what Lee sees as America's racist, corrupt white power structure. Too bad its story - about courageous whistle-blowing, lesbian procreation, and a black man's need to stand up, take responsibility for his actions, and do the right thing - doesn't do almost anything right.

Lee's initial target for censure is the crooked corporate culture that fosters brazenly greedy and duplicitous companies such as Enron and Worldcom. Jack Armstrong (Anthony Mackie) is a vice president at a pharmaceutical company whose new HIV cure has been rejected by the FDA. When he discovers a conspiracy orchestrated by the corporation's arrogant, racist CEO (Woody Harrelson) and his ruthless Martha Stewart-ish boss (Ellen Barkin) to cook the books and keep employees and shareholders in the dark about the new drug's ineffectiveness, Jack rats out his superiors to the SEC, and the price for betraying "the family" is immediate dismissal. As luck would have it, though, a new money-making venture falls directly into his, ahem, lap - his ex-fiancé Fatima (Kerry Washington), who left him for another woman, now wants to pay him $10,000 to impregnate her and her Dominican girlfriend. Before long, Armstrong - in some sort of filthier version of the Patrick Dempsey '80s cult classic Loverboy - is occupying his time spreading his seed through NYC's upper-crust lesbian community (which includes Monica Bellucci as a Mafioso don's daughter) for wads of cash.

Continue reading: She Hate Me Review

Company Man Review


Very Good
I have to admit something before I write this review. I am a die-hard conspiracy nut who loves the outrageous claims of betrayals and back-stabbing that the CIA and other governmental agencies have been dealing out like drunken blackjack dealers at Circus Circus for the past 40 years. The only problem is that people like Oliver Stone, Chris Carter, and Christopher Hitchens have basically ripped apart all the really good conspiracy theories already.

What we really need is a satire of those good conspiracies from the 1960s. With that in mind, Company Man, a brazen new comedy by Douglas McGrath and Peter Askin, supplies that swift kick in the confidential files of the CIA, the FBI, the NSA, and even the Boy Scouts. It's a quick-witted, grammatically correct, and often hilarious satire aimed dead center at the conspiracy nutcases and their shining theories.

Continue reading: Company Man Review

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good
Arguably, one of the best directors of the motion picture industry, Orson Welles was once quoted as saying, "When I die, they'll be picking over my creative bones. The films will suddenly get financing; the films will get restored. Old scripts that we couldn't get financed, they'll find the financing for some kid to direct."

Strangely enough, Welles couldn't have been more prophetic.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

13 Conversations About One Thing Review


Excellent
With a title as curious as 13 Conversations About One Thing, most moviegoers probably want to know what the "thing" is before plunking down their bucks to see the movie. Well, that "thing" appears to be happiness, and the search for it. But don't let that fact and the peppy title fool you - this film isn't filled with a bunch of inane chick chatter. Writer/director Jill Sprecher's follow-up to her debut Clockwatchers has an overall tone of despair and a faint hint of evil, much like that first film. It results in a surprising, bold, satisfying drama with a mildly depressing wave running through it.

But here, the downtrodden vibe has more complexity than Clockwatchers, as does the storyline. Co-written with sister Karen, Sprecher's screenplay follows a series of New York City tales that, aside from their underlying themes, are apparently unconnected... or are they?

Continue reading: 13 Conversations About One Thing Review

The Man Who Cried Review


Good
Even the title smacks of pretense, reminiscent of The Flower that Drank the Moon, that fictional bit of art house tripe overheard in Ghost World. But from Sally Potter, who proved so very self-obsessed in The Tango Lesson, returns again to her roots, this time studying her fascination with Russian and girls who sing. Christina Ricci takes center stage as the virtually silent Suzie, a Russian Jew sent to England and then Paris on the eve of WWII, but her brooding inactivity may simply be of too little interest to all but the most devoted fans of her, Johnny Depp (equally silent when not crying), and classic opera -- which plays throughout the movie.

Five Corners Review


Very Good
This curious indie will keep you guessing -- not because the plot is so complicated, but simply in trying to figure out who all these characters are and what they have to do with one another. At its core, the movie involves John Turturro as a just-outta-prison psycho and Jodie Foster as his once and future stalkee. Tim Robbins appears as her savior, while countless -- countless -- subplots swirl around them. Fun to watch, easy to forget soon after.

O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review


Excellent
Maverick movie directors eventually become domesticated. Don't believe me? The same guy who directed The Conversation also directed Jack. The man behind The French Connection helmed Blue Chips.

Whether it's through common sense, clean living, or skill, Joel and Ethan Coen have avoided a creative snag. After some 20 years, their movies are still original, intelligent. and funny without being aloof. Their latest effort, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, is no exception. Based on Homer's epic, The Odyssey, and set in Depression-era Mississippi, the brothers have done the unthinkable: They've taken classic literature and made it fun.

Continue reading: O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review

The Luzhin Defence Review


Very Good
Early on in the period drama The Luzhin Defence, Emily Watson's Natalia proclaims that she wants something different, and that's just what we get through most of this adaptation, based on Vladimir Nabokov's novel of chess and madness. But as acclaimed director Marleen Gorris (Mrs. Dalloway) takes us toward the vital final act, that sense of originality seems to fade.

Luckily, we are saved throughout by Watson's performance. As a woman vacationing with her pesky mother in 1920s Italy, she stumbles upon eccentric, pained, chess genius Alexander Luzhin, or more accurately, he stumbles upon her. Luzhin, played by a solid and risk-taking John Turturro, is disheveled and awkward, the kind of absent-minded obsessive that draws stares of both scorn and jealousy. Watson and Turturro, both at the top of their talents, create a sort of Romeo and Juliet -- he's reckless and unkempt, she's proper and well-mannered.

Continue reading: The Luzhin Defence Review

Barton Fink Review


Extraordinary
That "Barton Fink feeling" is all over the Coen brothers movie, a modern classic that both celebrates and damns the Golden Age of Hollywood. One of the Coens' most play-like movies, John Turturro stars in a career-making role as an angst-ridden supporter of the common man, a playwright who makes it big in New York and then sells out to L.A., where he is promptly interred in a seedy hotel to write a wrestling movie. There he meets a friendly but slightly off-kilter insurance salesman (John Goodman) and his hero, an old time writer (John Mahoney). Nothing turns out as it seems, and the surreal finale to the film elevate the movie to being one of the Coens' best.

Monkeybone Review


Weak

Stop-motion animation innovator Henry Selick, the cheerfully demented director of "The Nightmare Before Christmas" and "James and the Giant Peach," tries his hand at a feature-length hybrid in the new Brendan Fraser comedy "Monkeybone" -- and he makes a real mess of things.

Leaning heavily on its low-brow antics and animated effects, the story -- about a cartoonist in a coma who slips into a purgatory of creepy creations -- is sloppy, choppy, and so egregiously abbreviated that the actors don't even have time to give their characters personality or appeal.

Fraser is the cartoonist and the creator of a comic called Monkeybone, about a Puckish screwball simian whose raison d'etre is causing trouble. As the film opens Fraser's manager (Dave Foley) has just cut a deal for an animated series that will bring in millions in merchandising. Our hero's only real character trait, besides being a bit skittish, is that he's not very comfortable with greedily cashing in on his cartoon character.

Continue reading: Monkeybone Review

Company Man Review


Weak

As a film critic, there are few things more frustrating than watching a good movie self-destruct. It's painfully disappointing to be part way through a screening and excited about recommending the picture, when it suddenly takes a turn for the worse, spoiling everything you liked about it to begin with.

The best (or rather worst) example of this phenomenon is Brian DePalma's "Snake Eyes," which was a seat-gripping espionage-angled thriller -- until the mystery was solved an hour before the credits rolled and the rest of the movie flopped around like a dying fish.

"Company Man" is an espionage-angled comedy about a hapless sissy of a 1960s grammar teacher named Allen Quimp (Douglas McGrath) who tells his social-climbing wife (Signorney Weaver) that he's really a CIA agent posing as a schoolteacher to get her off his back about finding a more prestigious job "with commuting and ulcers and briefcases!"

Continue reading: Company Man Review

O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review


Excellent

Take Ulysses from Homer's "Odyssey," turn him into a dusty but peculiarly dapper hillbilly escaped from a Mississippi chain gang, circa 1937, and whaddya got? Only the funniest, most inspired movie of Coen Brothers illustrious comedy careers.

Taking screwball cues from Depression Era Hollywood and usurping their title from the "message movie" Joel McCrea's frustrated director wanted to make in 1941's satire "Sullivan's Travels," this picture's writers-directors Ethan and Joel Coen cook up a masterpiece of a scruffy romp about a no-class fugitive trying to get home to his wife before she re-marries to a colorless, straw-hatted dandy who holds more promise as a provider.

And who did the Coens get to play their uncouth Cajun hero, Ulysses "Everett" McGill? Why if it isn't George Clooney in a perfectly jaunty performance that seems to channel both the roguish comedic charm of Clark Gable in "It Happened One Night" and the earnest zaniness of Cary Grant in his screwiest comedies.

Continue reading: O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review

Mr Deeds Review


Zero

As someone who watches upwards of 500 movies a year, I've seen more than my fair share of bad remakes. But I've never seen one do anything as stomach-turning as the way Adam Sandler's new movie rapes, pillages and incinerates Frank Capra's classic "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town."

Entitled just "Mr. Deeds" and punctuated with elementary dialogue and the worst kind of feel-good muzak score, it doesn't contain a single sincere moment, a single performance that would pass muster in an elementary school play or a single scene without glaring continuity problems. Different takes within the same conversations don't even sync up -- ever.

As in Capra's very funny and heartfelt hallmark, the story is about a modest, idealistic small-town schnook named Longfellow Deeds (Sandler) who inherits a fortune from a distant uncle and is swept away to New York City, where ruthless tabloid scrutiny turns him into an object of both scorn and laughter. Leading the smear campaign is an ambitious female reporter (Winona Ryder), who poses as a fellow wide-eyed out-of-towner. But while trying to railroad Deeds into splashy front-page behavior, she falls for the guy, has a change of heart and decides to help save him from the urban wolves.

Continue reading: Mr Deeds Review

Secret Window Review


Good

Any half-savvy moviegoer will have the entire plot of "Secret Window" sussed out so far in advance that after the first couple reels the only thing left to do is sit back and enjoy Johnny Depp as he turns this tattered Stephen King B-thriller into a one-man tour de force of gloriously glib psychodrama.

It's a movie that aspires only to entertain with easy apprehension, and harbors no delusions that it's anything more than second-rate horror cobbled together from familiar bits of other King stories (notably "The Dark Half" and "Misery") -- in short, a corny goosepimpler for genre gourmets who wish more drive-in flicks were made with a crafty cinematic élan.

Depp delves happily and headlong into playing Mort Rainey, a dejected divorcé novelist who is holed up in a lakeside cabin, wallowing in writer's block and self-pity until John Shooter -- a nerve-racking nut job played by John Turturro with a Mississippi-backwoods drawl -- turns up on his doorstep accusing him of plagiarism. "Yew stowal mah stowry," the slump-shouldered, slack-jawed whacko bug-eyes from behind the rim of an Amish farmer's round-topped hat.

Continue reading: Secret Window Review

Anger Management Review


Unbearable

Writer David Dorfman, director Peter Segal and star Adam Sandler missed a golden opportunity in "Anger Management," a comedy bereft of laughs about a milquetoast office drone and designer of fat feline fashions (?) who is sentenced to rage therapy after an incident on an airline.

The incident: His repeated polite requests for a headset to watch the in-flight movie are absurdly mistaken for aggression by a flight crew with post-9/11 jitters. The missed opportunity: The concept's punchline should have been that he really is a rage-a-holic and the calm version of events we see is his skewed perspective of normalcy.

Instead, the picture sticks with the notions that typically dim-bulb Sandler (insert empty-eyed double-take head-cocks here) really is a misunderstood nice guy, and the actor fails to find a single genuine laugh in the story's goofball gimmick -- which is that his nutzo court-appointed therapist (Jack Nicholson, volume turned up to 11) moves in with him and makes his life a living hell.

Continue reading: Anger Management Review

Collateral Damage Review


Weak

The terrorists in "Collateral Damage" must have coordinated with the movie's screenwriters when they were planning their big bombing for the finale. Their getaway vehicle for the scene is a motorcycle, which, of course, seats two. But there are three people who'd have to get away, according to their plan. How did they know in advance that one of them would be left behind? How did they know they'd only need a motorbike?

That's one of the more abstract plot holes in this Arnold Schwarzenegger action dud about an average (6'2", 250 lbs., heavy Austrian accent) American firefighter out to avenge his wife and son after they're killed in a terrorist bombing. But don't worry, there are plenty more common-sense gaffes that are far more obvious, especially the plethora of laughable security breach blunders that betray the movie's pre-Sept. 11 origins.

Quickly realizing those self-serving wonks at the CIA, FBI and State Department aren't going to get the bomber -- a cocaine-running Colombian rebel called "The Wolf" -- Arnie engineers his own one-man mission to Central America to smoke the guy out and kill him. He hikes, rides beaten-up busses and bribes poor boat fishermen to get him into rebel territory. There he poses as a mechanic to infiltrate a bad-guy stronghold, "MacGuyvers" himself a couple do-it-yourself bombs and starts blowing stuff up.

Continue reading: Collateral Damage Review

The Man Who Cried Review


Weak

An erratically emotional saga of a young Russian refugee's sidetracked search for her father, Sally Potter's "The Man Who Cried" presents such a haunting and moving first act that the balance of the story seems steadily to decline.

After its flash-forward title sequence that unnecessarily reveals a pivotal moment of the last act, story proper opens in a Jewish farming village in 1927 Russia, where a beautiful little girl is playing hide-and-seek in the tall grass with her adoring father, unaware that he is about to leave for America, hoping to find work then send for his family.

The girl's life soon changes from blithe to melancholy, as she doesn't understand why her father is going away. Then her life becomes downright terrifying as the village is attacked and burned, and to save her life the girl's mother forces her to run away.

Continue reading: The Man Who Cried Review

The Luzhin Defence Review


OK

John Turturro is all about idiosyncrasies in "The Luzhin Defence," an adaptation of a Vladimir Nobokov novel in which the actor plays a brilliant 1920s chess grand master whose strict, sometimes cruel upbringing has left him an erratic social misfit.

Deeply submerged in his character, he walks like he's forever in the middle of trying to prevent a stumble. Reflected in his busy eyes is the fact that his mind is compulsively darting and dashing about. And he's a man who lacks certain social graces -- like getting a girl's name before he proposes marriage to her.

Visiting a lakeside resort chateau in northern Italy for a championship chess tournament, Alexander Luzhin (Turturro) finds himself distracted by a beautiful Russian heiress named Natalia (Emily Watson), on holiday with her persnickety bluenosed parents. Unable to get her out of his mind after one brief encounter and not adept at social interaction, Luzhin approaches her out of the blue, while she's in the middle of playing tennis, to burst out his proposal.

Continue reading: The Luzhin Defence Review

SHE HATE ME Review


Bad

What could Spike Lee have been thinking?

Right on the heels of an unalloyed masterpiece, "25th Hour," the great American filmmaker delivers "She Hate Me," a bizarre, head-scratching hodgepodge of poorly executed bad ideas.

Many film buffs consider Lee a hit-and-miss director, but even his biggest failures ("Jungle Fever," "Summer of Sam," "Bamboozled") have had some kind of coherence, some alignment of angry, passionate ideas, painted with Lee's singular vision and voice.

Continue reading: SHE HATE ME Review

Thirteen Conversations About One Thing Review


OK

In the intricate ensemble think-piece "Thirteen Conversations About One Thing," karma-fueled philosophical allegories revolve around contentment, resentfulness, self-fulfillment and other cinematic soul-food themes.

An intelligent, earnest, intimate film that drops the ball only when it pauses for blunt exposition to make sure you're getting its metaphysical point, this second effort from the writing-directing sisters Karen and Jill Sprechter ("Clockwatchers") consists of a knotted string of stories that are not necessarily profound or even all that memorable. But it's a movie with such realistic characters and humbly consequential performances that it leaves a subconscious impression nevertheless.

The interwoven vignettes imagined by the Sprechters begin with a punctilious, moth-eaten academic (John Turturro) leaving his wife (Amy Irving) after a mugging that leads him to decide he's been living an unsatisfying life. But soon he's even more frustrated because he hasn't a clue how to find that missing satisfaction.

Continue reading: Thirteen Conversations About One Thing Review

John Turturro

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John Turturro

Date of birth

28th February, 1957

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.84




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John Turturro Movies

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

With this fifth Transformers movie, it seems clear that Michael Bay is still trying to...

Transformers: The Last Knight Trailer

Transformers: The Last Knight Trailer

Where is Optimus Prime when we need him most? Despite the fact that Earth is...

Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Trailer

Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Trailer

Has humanity been left to defend itself against the ruthless Decepticons now that Optimus Prime...

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Transformers: The Last Knight - Teaser Trailer

Transformers: The Last Knight - Teaser Trailer

With the few remaining Autobots in hiding, the world is a dark place. Galvatron is...

Hands Of Stone Trailer

Hands Of Stone Trailer

Roberto "Manos de Piedra" Duran was fierce in the ring, his poor upbringing on the...

Mia Madre Trailer

Mia Madre Trailer

Margherita is an Italian filmmaker whose high-flying career doesn't compensate for the turmoil she's struggling...

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Exodus: Gods and Kings Movie Review

Exodus: Gods and Kings Movie Review

Aside from impressive 21st century digital effects, this new take on the Moses story pales...

Exodus: Gods and Kings Trailer

Exodus: Gods and Kings Trailer

Director Ridley Scott (Alien, Gladiator, Kingdom of Heaven) talks about world of his new film,...

God's Pocket Movie Review

God's Pocket Movie Review

Despite a strong sense of the characters and the setting, this film struggles to engage...

Exodus: Gods And Kings Trailer

Exodus: Gods And Kings Trailer

Moses and the Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses grew up together as brothers after the former was...

God's Pocket Trailer

God's Pocket Trailer

God's Pocket seems to be an ordinary working class neighbourhood at face value; full of...

Fading Gigolo Movie Review

Fading Gigolo Movie Review

With a witty observational script, amusing characters and a jazzy sense of life in New...

Fading Gigolo Trailer

Fading Gigolo Trailer

Strapped for cash, handsome but middle-aged bookshop worker Fioravante decides to accept an offer of...

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