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Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Trailer


Has humanity been left to defend itself against the ruthless Decepticons now that Optimus Prime has vacated the planet? It may seem that way, but the Autobot leader is still relatively close by, seeking his own mission to uncover the secrets of his origins. Father and daughter Cade (Mark Wahlberg) and Tessa Yeager are surviving as best they can under the protection of the few Autobots that remain, but Megatron is on the warpath reducing the planet to rubble and wiping out every human that stands in the way of his domination. There's a hopeless, apocalyptic mood running through this new story, because the war between man and machine will no doubt continue to wage until one of both races are extinct. However, there may be, at least, another hero who can save Earth from total ruin.

Continue: Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Trailer

Mark Ruffalo Returns To Broadway For First Time In More Than Ten Years


Mark Ruffalo John Turturro

Mark Ruffalo is to return to Broadway for the first time in over a decade, after it was announced that he’s been cast to headline an upcoming revival of Arthur Miller’s ‘The Price’ instead of John Turturro.

After it was revealed this week by his representatives that Turturro had to bow out of his role as previously announced role as Victor Franz because of his commitments to filming schedules on other projects, the Roundabout Theatre Company’s production has replaced one big star with another, according to Deadline.

Ruffalo therefore joins a cast which includes Tony Shalhoub as his brother, Jessica Hecht as his wife and Danny DeVito in a Broadway debut as a furniture salesman. Miller’s 1968 drama sees Ruffalo’s character Victor trying to deal with his deceased father’s estate after thirty years living away, coming face to face with his estranged brother and opening old wounds in the process.

Continue reading: Mark Ruffalo Returns To Broadway For First Time In More Than Ten Years

From Fleabag To The People V. O.J. - The Shows That Glued Us To The Box In 2016


Cuba Gooding Junior Game Of Thrones Tom Hiddleston John Turturro

2016 has been a hell of a year for television. The Primetime Emmy nominations earlier this year were packed with a mass of incredible TV shows both brand new and ongoing, and it's not stopped there either. Whether it's a limited series of a long-running franchise, television has never been more loved.

Here are our favourite TV shows of the year:

Fleabag is written by and stars Phoebe Waller-BridgeFleabag is written by and stars Phoebe Waller-Bridge

Continue reading: From Fleabag To The People V. O.J. - The Shows That Glued Us To The Box In 2016

Transformers: The Last Knight - Teaser Trailer


With the few remaining Autobots in hiding, the world is a dark place. Galvatron is still at large and Optimus Prime has left earth to fulfil a bigger mission, having gone to seek out the Creators. Having previously helped the Autobots, Cade Yeager is still in danger and the war between man and machine is reaching ever higher levels.

The Decepticons still have a wish to invade and take over the planet Earth and now it looks like they might be in the best position to do so. Why do these machines have such a fascination with our planet and how many genuine Autobots are left to help fight alongside humans?

The soundtrack to the first trailer for Transformers: The Last Knight is a re-working of Flaming Lips single 'Do You Realize' recorded by Ursine Vulpine.

Continue: Transformers: The Last Knight - Teaser Trailer

Hands Of Stone Trailer


Roberto "Manos de Piedra" Duran was fierce in the ring, his poor upbringing on the streets of Panama all contributed to the man he became. He's extremely tough but his wild streak stops him from becoming the champion he ought to be.

Enter Ray Arcel, Arcel was an old pro, the best of the best and had taken many boxers into the ring and seen them come out the champion. Arcel could clearly see that Duran had a gift and though technically the trainer was retired, Duran's talent made him take his place back at the side of the ring.

 

Continue: Hands Of Stone Trailer

Katherine Borowitz, John Turturro and Diego Turturro - The Cinema Society & Women's Health screening of Millennium Entertainment's 'Fading Gigolo'at SVA Theater on April 11, 2014 in New York City. - New York, New York, United States - Saturday 12th April 2014

Katherine Borowitz, John Turturro and Diego Turturro
Katherine Borowitz, John Turturro and Diego Turturro
Katherine Borowitz, John Turturro and Diego Turturro

John Turturro - John Turturro promoting his new film 'Fading Gigolo' during the Miami International Film Festival 2014 - Miami Beach, Florida, United States - Monday 10th March 2014

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

A Week In Movies: Gravity And 12 Years A Slave Lead Oscar Nominations, Filming Goes To The Wire On Captain America 2


Matthew Mcconaughey Michael Cera Chris Evans Scarlett Johansson Anthony Mackie Samuel L Jackson Dominic Cooper Will Arnett Katherine Heigl John Turturro Woody Allen

Jared Leto Golden Globes 2014

After the glamour of the essentially irrelevant Golden Globes on Sunday, the biggest movie news this week was the Oscar nominations announcement on Wednesday. As expected, 12 Years a Slave and Gravity got another big awards-season boost, while American Hustle, Dallas Buyers Club and Nebraska move into pole position, bumping Inside Llewyn Davis and The Wolf of Wall Street out of the spotlight. For now. For those who need to catch up on these titles click here for 12 Years a SlaveGravityAmerican HustleDallas Buyers ClubNebraskaInside Llewyn Davis and The Wolf of Wall Street.

Awards contenders continue to dominate cinema screens in both America and Britain, although distributors are sneaking smaller films in as alternative programming. In the US, audiences can catch the high school comedy G.B.F. or the British period romance Summer in February, while in the UK offbeat options include Michael Cera in the Chilean road trip Crystal Fairy and the cheeky Penn & Teller documentary Tim's Vermeer. To read our reviews click here for  G.B.F.Summer in FebruaryCrystal Fairy and Penn & Teller documentary Tim's Vermeer.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Gravity And 12 Years A Slave Lead Oscar Nominations, Filming Goes To The Wire On Captain America 2

Sigourney Weaver Signs Up For Ridley Scott's Biblical Epic, 'Exodus'


Sigourney Weaver Ridley Scott John Turturro Christian Bale Joel Edgerton Aaron Paul

Sigourney Weaver is set to star in another Ridley Scott-directed movie, 34 years after she made her name in his 1979 sci-fi classic, Alien. The 63 year-old will appear in Scott's upcoming biblical epic Exodus in which she will play Tuya, mother of Ramses, reports THR.

Sigourney Weaver
Sigourney Weaver Will Play The Mother Of Pharoah Ramses.

Weaver has just finished a stint on Broadway in the Tony-winning Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike and she has also signed up to the Mortal Instruments sequel, City of Ashes.

Continue reading: Sigourney Weaver Signs Up For Ridley Scott's Biblical Epic, 'Exodus'

John Turturro; Spike Lee Celebrities courtside at the New York Knicks vs. Chicago Bulls game at Madison Square Garden Featuring: John Turturro, Spike Lee Where: NY, NY, United States When: 11 Jan 2013

John Turturro, Spike Lee and Madison Square Garden
John Turturro, Spike Lee and Madison Square Garden
Drew Barrymore, John Turturro, Spike Lee and Madison Square Garden

John Turturro Wednesday 13th June 2012 Persol Magnificent Obsessions: 30 Stories of Craftsmanship in Film held at the Museum of Moving Image

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Wednesday 13th June 2012

John Turturro

Katherine Borowitz and John Turturro - Katherine Borowitz, John Turturro and son Diego Turturro Sunday 29th April 2012 Opening night of the CSC production of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' at the Classic Stage Company - Arrivals

Katherine Borowitz and John Turturro

Maxwell and John Turturro - Roberta Maxwell and John Turturro Thursday 23rd February 2012 Opening night of Classic Stage Company’s production of 'Galileo' at the CSC Theatre - Arrivals

Maxwell and John Turturro
Maxwell

John Turturro Friday 9th September 2011 Meet and greet with the cast of the Broadway production of 'Relatively Speaking' held at Sardi's restaurant. New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro and Marlo Thomas
John Turturro
John Turturro

Cars 2 Review


Good
There's an astounding level of detail in the animation of this sequel to Pixar's iffy 2006 hit Cars. It's good fun but, with so many characters and plot strands, it also feels cluttered and rather chaotic.

Global daredevil Axelrod (Izzard) has challenged the world's fastest cars to a three-part grand prix, so rally champ McQueen (Wilson) heads to Tokyo with his pal Mater (Larry) to take on rival F1 racer Francesco (Turturro). But Mater obliviously stumbles into a sinister international espionage operation, mistaken for a spy by British agents Finn and Holly (Caine and Mortimer). As the competition continues to the Italian Riviera and London, McQueen frets that he has insulted Mater. But he's actually entangled in a mission to stop a mysterious villain from blowing up the racers.

Continue reading: Cars 2 Review

Transformers: Dark Of The Moon Review


Good

With his usual disregard for story logic, Bay plunges us into another deafening metal-against-metal smackdown. Fortunately, this film is a lot more entertaining than Part 2, because it has a more linear plot. And it looks absolutely amazing.

With everything back to normal, Sam (LaBeouf) needs a job to impress his impossibly hot new girlfriend Carly (Huntington-Whiteley). Then strange things start happening around him. Again. And soon he realises that the Decepticons are back to wage war against the Autobot-human alliance. But he has to convince an arrogant government official (McDormand) to let him get involved with his old team (Duhamel, Gibson, Turturro and their Autobot buddies). All of this has something to do with a secret weapon that crashed onto the dark side of the moon in 1961, sparking the space race.

McDormand is easily the best thing about this film, even if her character has a dramatic personality shift halfway through the film. Malkovich is also terrific (as Sam's offbeat new boss), and Dempsey has his moments as well (as Carly's boss and cause of Sam's inferiority complex). Fortunately, the narrative is straightforward enough to give all of the actors the chance to make their mark, distinguishing themselves above the chaos.

Sadly, the same can't be said about the battling robots. While the first-rate animation has a staggering attention to detail, the deafening battles are still impossible to follow. They amount to an eye-catching display of whizzy effects as clanking robots bash each other senseless and destroy everything around them (Chicago gets the full destructive force for a change). Although at least they fit vaguely into the plot this time.

Meanwhile, lapses in even the most twisted logic are plentiful, including the fact that Sam seems to have metallic Transformer bones to resist injury as he's flung into walls and dropped from high places (not to mention Carly's magical white suit and heels). In other words, it's deeply preposterous and almost painfully boyish, but it's nowhere near as muddled as the last chapter. And besides keeping our eyes entertained, there are some great moments throughout the mayhem.

John Turturro Tuesday 28th June 2011 New York premiere of 'Transformers: Dark of the Moon' at TKS Time Square - Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro

Patti LuPone, John Turturro, Katherine Borowitz and Matt Johnson Thursday 4th November 2010 Patti LuPone, John Turturro, Katherine Borowitz and Matt Johnson Opening night after party for the Lincoln Center Theater Broadway production of 'Women On the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown' held at the Millennium Broadway Hotel. New York City, USA

Patti Lupone, John Turturro, Katherine Borowitz and Matt Johnson
Patti Lupone
Pedro Almodovar and Patti Lupone
Patti Lupone
Guests and Patti Lupone
Justin Guarini, Patti Lupone and Pedro Almodovar

The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 Review


Good
Adapting a steely 1970s hit into a glossy 21st century blockbuster, Tony Scott indulges in his usual flashy pyrotechnics, which almost cover up the gaping craters in the plot. He also encourages his cast to really go for it.

Walter (Washington) is working at the dispatch desk for the New York Subway when crazed gunman Ryder (Travolta) hijacks the Pelham 123 and demands a huge ransom, or else he'll start killing passengers. Ryder refuses to talk to the know-it-all terrorism expert (Turturro), so Walter is pressed into service as a negotiator while the mayor (Gandolfini) gets the cash together. But Ryder and his goons are serious about this and, as the body count grows, the clock is ticking.

Director Scott and writer Helgeland aren't known for their subtlety, and this film is all whizzy style that's more about pure entertainment rather than establishing any actual suspense or character tension. The whole film is a collection of crashing edits, freeze frames, countdown graphics, loud sound effects and cheesily hysterical dialog. In other words, it's great fun. And it gives the cast plenty of scenery to chomp on--especially Travolta, who shows no mercy as he snarls and spits out every line.

Since this is a film about a Subway carriage sitting still in a tunnel, Scott keeps the camera moving at all times. He also manages to throw in a crazed car chase and loads of big crashes for no real reason, as well as orchestrating a painfully contrived reason to get Washington in on the gun-waving action. Not to throwing in several rather overwrought back-stories. By the end, the film has turned into a full-on Die Hard movie, complete with over-the-top violence and some real brutality.

Amid the fabulously enjoyable actors, it's Gandolfini who walks off with the movie using sardonic understatement. The whole film is pretty hilarious, although this clearly wasn't the intention. Scott zooms past plot holes like a runaway train; we barely have time to say "Huh?" before the next bit of action mayhem assaults all our senses. There's not a moment of actual suspense, but it's so big and outrageous that we can't help but hold on for the ride.

Continue reading: The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 Review

John Turturro, Danny Aiello and Directors Guild Of America - John Turturro, Joie Lee, composer Bill Lee, Danny Aiello,Samuel L. Jackson, Ruby Dee Davis and director Spike Lee New York City, USA - attend the 20th Anniversary Screening of 'Do The Right Thing' at Directors Guild of America Theater Monday 29th June 2009

John Turturro, Danny Aiello and Directors Guild Of America
John Turturro and Directors Guild Of America

Tranformers: Revenge Of The Fallen Review


Weak
Michael Bay makes his loudest, most bombastic movie yet (which is saying a lot) with a bloated action sequel so packed with special effects that it's virtually a cartoon. The humans barely register on screen, but it does look pretty cool.

Two years after teenaged Sam (LaBeouf) helped the alien Autobots fight off the evil Decepticons, he's ready to leave for university and start a long-distance relationship with his hot girlfriend Mikaela (Fox). But the Fallen, the deposed Decepticon leader, has other plans. And since Sam is the key to reviving their destructive plan, he's sucked back into the chaos along with Mikaela, his parents (Dunn and White), his new roommate (Rodriguez) and ex-agent Simmons (Turturro). They suddenly find themselves in Egypt, where a massive battle's about to begin.

Continue reading: Tranformers: Revenge Of The Fallen Review

John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square Monday 15th June 2009 UK film premiere of 'Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen' held at the Odeon Leicester Square London, England

John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square
John Turturro and Odeon Leicester Square

The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009) Review


Good
Excellent acting can save almost anything. Even the most mediocre script or hamfisted direction can usually be manipulated and salvaged by a couple of pros performing at their thespian peak. It doesn't always work -- the actors can and often do make their obvious attempts known, stealing so much of the limelight that the project can't help but implode. But for something like The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, a routine remake of a '70s pulp novel/post-modern thriller, star power is the all-important ingredient. The work of Denzel Washington and John Travolta elevates material that otherwise sits flatly on the screen. No matter how hard director Tony Scott and screenwriter Brian Helgeland try, the hijack/hostage material here plays as dated, and in some instances, dull.

For recently demoted NYC Transit Authority official Walter Garber (Washington), working the dispatcher's desk is just the latest in a rash of embarrassments. Under investigation for taking bribes, the longtime civil servant is resolved to do his job and not make waves. Naturally, all that changes when the subway out of Pelham City station is hijacked by four gun-toting criminals. Led by the mysterious "Mr. Ryder" (Travolta), their demands are simple -- $10 million in one hour. If the delivery is late, they will kill one hostage for every minute over 60 they have to wait. Initially, the Mayor (James Gandolfini) is convinced that the NYPD, under the direction of hostage negotiator Camonetti (John Turturro) will get the situation under control. But Ryder will only deal with Garber, and when he makes his deadly intentions known, the former front office man must save the day.

Continue reading: The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009) Review

What Just Happened Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars can hinge upon a leading man's decision to shave. Just look at Bruce Willis. Not in real life... but in What Just Happened, where Willis appears as himself. In the film, he's been cast in a big movie, but he's put on a few pounds since his last picture, and has decided to grow a shaggy beard.

This doesn't settle well with the studio that's paying $20 million for a man with sex-appeal; they don't want someone who resembles Santa Claus. If Willis doesn't shave and drop some weight, the studio will pull the plug on the movie and sue for damages. But Willis has been growing the beard for six months and wants to make an artistic statement. He's not going to be picking up a can of shaving cream anytime soon.

Continue reading: What Just Happened Review

John Turturro Wednesday 6th August 2008 New York Premiere of 'Vicky Cristina Barcelona' at Cinema 2 - Outside Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

John Turturro Wednesday 6th August 2008 New York Premiere of 'Vicky Cristina Barcelona' at Cinema 2 - Inside Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro

You Don't Mess With The Zohan Review


Bad
You don't laugh with the Zohan, either.

Adam Sandler's latest lewd creation is Israel's top trained assassin who dreams of escaping his nation's ever-present conflict with the Palestinians. For the Zohan, killing comes as easy as breathing. During a deadly battle with his arch-nemesis the Phantom (John Turturro), though, the Zohan fakes his own death so he can safely flee to New York City and pursue his aspiration of becoming a hair stylist.

Continue reading: You Don't Mess With The Zohan Review

John Turturro Wednesday 4th June 2008 New York Premiere of 'You Don't Mess with the Zohan' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals New York City, USA

John Turturro
John Turturro
John Turturro

Margot At The Wedding Review


Good
Eventually it may be that Noah Baumbach could turn into this country's answer to France's Eric Rohmer, turning out a steady diet of small, circumspect dramas about the lives and neurotic times of New York-era literary bourgeoisie. That's one of the things that comes to mind as one takes in Margot at the Wedding, Baumbach's fourth time out as writer/director and one that seems to set a template for the future. It's a chill breeze of a film steeped in ugly inter-familial squabbling and the blinkered mentality of its self-absorbed characters who can generally only raise their gaze from their own navels long enough to find something lacking in the person they're addressing. The sour tone which was shot through Baumbach's previous work, The Squid and the Whale, has almost completely curdled here, though without losing any of that film's swift tartness.

As the titular Margot, Nicole Kidman does the yeoman's share of the work here, as the bitchy and borderline sociopathic older sister who's reluctantly comes up from Manhattan to her sister Pauline's wedding at the ancestral country home, where she's marrying a guy she finds barely even worthy of her contempt. "He's not ugly, he's just completely unattractive," is one of the many evil bon mots that Baumbach gives Kidman to spit out in her seemingly compulsive need to find fault in and drive to despair anyone within eyesight. She makes quite a pair with Jennifer Jason Leigh as Pauline, the two of them strangely beautiful while nestled under stringy and flyaway mouse-brown mops. Kidman's eyes are flashing and penetrating as Leigh's are dreamy, the two of them seemingly not of this planet but in entirely different ways.

Continue reading: Margot At The Wedding Review

Slipstream Review


Weak
"It means everything and it means nothing at all. Life is so illusion-like, so dreamlike, that I think it's all a dream... a dream within a dream. What is real? What is fantasy? You grasp this moment and then, suddenly, it's gone. I was talking 10 minutes ago, but that's all gone..."

Isn't it funny that if a stockbroker said that, his friends and family would question his psychiatric health and advise him to find profession help, but when a 69-year-old Academy Award winner says that, he not only gets a movie made, but attracts a renowned cast and crew boasting a combined total of more than 250 awards, honors, and nominations?

Continue reading: Slipstream Review

A Few Days In September Review


Bad
Lots of bad things seem to happen in a matter of "days" in the month of September. It took Four Days in September for Alan Arkin's kidnapping drama to unfold, but only One Day for the Munich Olympic hostage catastrophe to pan out. 9/11 would be the backdrop for 7 Days in September. 9/11 is the subjext again here, but director Santiago Amigorena must have sensed that primary numbers were getting scarce, saddling his film with the awful title A Few Days in September. You know, give or take.

The title isn't all that's awful about this film, a mess of a story that wants desperately to be an espionage thriller. The tale centers around a missing spy named Elliot. On the hunt for him is Irène (Juliette Binoche, perhaps never more out of character) and two of Elliot's kids, American David (Tom Riley) and French Orlando (Sara Forestier), actually step-relations.

Continue reading: A Few Days In September Review

Romance & Cigarettes Review


Weak
John Turturro's dream project Romance & Cigarettes is a gutter-style jukebox musical with chutzpah to spare and which doesn't know when to quit. It's all here: Singing garbagemen! Catfight in a SoHo lingerie store! Hot-to-trot Kate Winslet as a scorchingly foul-mouthed Irish hussy. Toe-tapping Christopher Walken in full strutting peacock mode, driving an old Detroit beater with a license plate reading "BoDiddley." A wife screaming at her husband, recently discovered cheating, "I trim your nose hair!" Family, infidelity, and a basketful of pop tunes for everyone to sing along to -- Ute Lemper to Connie Francis to Bruce Springsteen to James Brown to Tom Jones to....

Somewhere in all Turturro's chaos is a story about Nick Murder (James Gandolfini), a blue-collar schlub with a stolid wife, Kitty (Susan Sarandon), and a trio of slightly cracked daughters -- Constance, Baby, and Rosebud (Mary-Louise Parker, Aida Turturro, and Mandy Moore, respectively) -- who function partially as a junior set of Furies but are mostly there to bash out songs in the backyard as part of the three-piece bubblegum garage band they've formed. In short: Nick's a two-timing bastard who's stepping out on the wife with Tula (the previously mentioned Irish hussy), a fact Kitty doesn't take to overly well, and numerous friends and family get dragged into their scuffle and forcing everyone to occasionally bust out in song.

Continue reading: Romance & Cigarettes Review

Transformers Review


OK
For the first five minutes of Transformers -- a sound-and-fury tornado of effects that could only entertain during summer's dumb-dumb dog days -- you will believe that bombastic blockbuster director Michael Bay was the right choice to helm the project. Peter Cullen, who has voiced heroic robot Optimus Prime since the original Transformers cartoon of 1984, explains the series' legacy as his velvet voice establishes this new movie's driving quest: The search for a hidden cube that is the centerpiece of an age-old war. Geeks will go crazy.

The film's final 45 minutes lend credence to the notion that Bay deserved the job. Essentially an endless battle between the Autobots (good) and the Decepticons (bad), the conclusion of Transformers raises the bar for summer movie special effects to an unattainable height. Bay and the wizards at Industrial Light & Magic cram so much eye candy into every frame, my corneas have cavities.

Continue reading: Transformers Review

Sacco And Vanzetti Review


Good
To some extent, popular movements and agitators rely on their martyrs to keep the juices flowing. History is littered with examples of causes that languished in apathy and obscurity until blood was spilled, whether in a public square during a demonstration or inside the stone walls of an execution chamber. So it is with the notorious 1927 execution of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, two most likely innocent men who appeared to have been framed by an establishment fearful of both immigrants of the "wrong" kind and any sort of popular social justice movement. Seemingly good men both, probably guilty of nothing more than political activism, they would serve as standard-bearers for much of what was wrong about America during its period of greatest upheaval, when the promise of the world's most powerful democracy quite often corrupted and left for dead.

Peter Miller's Sacco and Vanzetti could have been the purest bathos, being as it is the moving story of how two Italian immigrants came to America looking for a better life, only to find racial prejudice and railroaded justice. A producer on some of Ken Burns' landmark docu-series, Miller has a firebrand's sense of injustice -- more often muffled in Burns' down-the-middle films -- which he lets show here from the start in no uncertain terms, but doesn't completely allow to wrest the story away from him. That is, the desire to make political points is very much in evidence here (why else to place lefty historian and People's History of the United States author Howard Zinn as one of the primary talking heads?) but it doesn't often overwhelm Miller's need as a documentarian to record the truth in some unvarnished fashion. Not often. There are times, of course, when the indignation and need to place Sacco and Vanzetti in the hallowed hall of left-wing martyrs takes over completely, as when one interviewee states that the story should be referred to as "The Passion of Sacco and Vanzetti."

Continue reading: Sacco And Vanzetti Review

The Good Shepherd Review


Excellent
Starting in the hot mess of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, reaching back to the 1930s and then hopscotching back and forth between those dates whenever the mood strikes it, the pleasingly complex espionage epic The Good Shepherd tries to tell the story of the birth, rise, and (in a sense) death of the Central Intelligence Agency through the fictional composite character Edward Wilson (Matt Damon). It's a monumental piece of history to bite off, but Eric Roth's ambitious, multilayered script certainly makes a good attempt at digesting it for us.

While the CIA's roots in the WWII-era OSS (Office of Strategic Services) are well established, very few films have rooted the American spy service as firmly as this one does in its starched, prim and proper WASP world. Wilson, played by Damon as a tight-lipped, practically invisible cipher, comes from one of that world's better families, and so is a shoo-in for Yale's secret Skull & Bones society once he does a little snooping for the FBI on his pro-Nazi poetry professor (Michael Gambon). Smart and stoic, Wilson shoots up the OSS ranks and soon is masterminding the CIA's global subterfuge against the Soviets.

Continue reading: The Good Shepherd Review

Quiz Show Review


Very Good
People have tried to peg the "end of American innocence" on all sorts of things -- Vietnam, Watergate, the nuclear arms race -- but Robert Redford is, I believe, the first and only person to blame the decline of western civilization on the 21 game show scandal of the 1950s. But there you have it: A curious incident from the past -- and an inevitability, really -- in which upstanding blueblood Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes in a very memorable role) gets caught up in a fixed game show, bringing the show and its producers (but ultimately, no one else) to its knees. Strangely, for such a buildup -- and Redford manages to build quite a snowball of drama in all of this, full of heroes and antiheroes -- the payoff is a real letdown. America survived the quiz show scandals, and trying to overblow the impact of what amounts to a novelty investigation rings a little bit false.

To Live And Die In L.A. Review


Good
Tough as nails cop drama has an on-the-edge cop (Petersen) doing anything he can to take down the counterfeiter (Dafoe) who killed his partner. Extremely bloody and gruesome, To Live and Die in L.A. shows exactly how painful it can be to get shot, butchered, and burned alive. In other words, there's a whole lot more dying than living going on here... Music by none other than Wang Chung.

Unstrung Heroes Review


Excellent
Diane Keaton's directorial feature film debut is a very impressive one. Unstrung Heroes is a smart, bittersweet drama about a boy growing up in postwar suburbia. 12-year old Steven Lidz (Nathan Watt) is surrounded by his inventor father (John Turturro) and nearly-insane uncles Danny and Arthur (Seinfeld's Michael Richards and Maury Chaykin). When his mother Selma (Andie McDowell) develops cancer from her chain smoking, Steven's life begins to slowly unravel.

The pressures of Selma's illness take their toll on everyone, and Steven becomes lost in the cyclone of anger and sorrow that accompanies any tragedy like this. To find peace, Steven runs away to stay with his uncles, where he finds a new world of self-realization, living on his own terms instead of the indifferent rules set down by his father and by society.

Continue reading: Unstrung Heroes Review

Clockers Review


Weak
After the first 2 minutes of Clockers, during which a parade of bloody crime scene photos are splashed on the screen, you'll be ready to put down your popcorn. After the first 15 minutes, you'll be bored enough to go buy some more.

You can't imagine how sick and tired I was of hearing the hype surrounding Clockers, Spike Lee's latest film about (surprise!) African-Americans in Brooklyn who get into trouble with drugs, murder, and betrayal. Every other critic on the planet will probably say they love Clockers so as not to appear uncool. I'll give it to you straight.

Continue reading: Clockers Review

All Revved Up Review


Bad
What are John Turturro and Lili Taylor doing in a movie with race cars on the video cover -- a movie called All Revved Up?

Beats the crap outta me. I suffered through the 83 minutes of Revved and am no closer to figuring out why it was made, what attracted its stars to the project, or even what the hell it was supposed to be about.

Continue reading: All Revved Up Review

Secret Window Review


Weak
Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden), shares a striking resemblance to one of King's best films, Misery. This time around, the writer is held captive in his own home by an obsessed fan who insists he rewrite the ending to one of his novels. Sound familiar? After Window's first few scenes, it seems the film is destined to be a remix of its predecessor. Yet, what we ultimately receive in Window is a clear disappointment, not because it follows a familiar formula, but because it lacks the suspense and action so prevalent in King's novels.

The fan, John Shooter (John Turturro), believes novelist Mort Rainey (Johnny Depp) has plagiarized one of his novels. Shooter shows up at Rainey's rustic, upstate New York cabin ready to inflict whatever force necessary on Rainey until he admits to copying Shooter's work. Rainey is completely unprepared to deal with the situation. Rainey is struggling to come up with an idea for his latest novel and is dealing with the pain of his pending divorce to wife Amy (Maria Bello). When bad things start happening, Rainey immediately suspects Amy's home-wrecking boyfriend Ted (Timothy Hutton) could be the mastermind behind the madness. Rainey hires a private investigator (Charles S. Dutton) to sniff around the town, patrol his cabin at night, and conduct the investigative work Rainey himself is too lazy to do.

Continue reading: Secret Window Review

Miller's Crossing Review


Good
The Coen brothers went all Clockwork Orangey in their most violent but least ironic picture, Miller's Crossing. It's a relatively run of the mill gangster thriller, though oddly the film has found an intensely loyal audience. (Many even consider it to be the best of the Coens' films.) The story follows a Prohibition era crime boss's aide (Gabriel Byrne), who finds himself trying to keep the peace between his boss and a warring faction. He loves his boss's gal, too.

Continue reading: Miller's Crossing Review

Illuminata Review


Weak
The art of acting is fascinating and mysterious, even for the actors who practice it. Unfortunately, for many artists, acting is too fascinating, and they can't resist the temptation to over-analyze it and to make plays/films about it. Playwright Brandon Cole and actor-director John Turturro, creators of Illuminata, are the latest to succumb.

Turturro plays a dramatist, Tuccio, struggling to make his name in the Manhattan theater scene at the turn of the century. Tuccio uses the unexpected illness of an actor (played by Matthew Sussman) to convince the owners of a Manhattan theater to chance his play, Illuminata. Unfortunately, that is not only the movie's premise, but also most of the plot.

Continue reading: Illuminata Review

Rounders Review


Excellent
Eighty bucks. That's about how much money I've lost playing poker since I saw Rounders. Not that this statistic is an inherently bad sign for the movie or anything. In fact, the fact that I was so motivated by the movie to put all that money on the table speaks positively of the picture.

Rounders (the name is short-hand for people who make their living playing poker) stars Matt Damon and Edward Norton as poker playing buddies going in different directions. Damon, after losing a very big money hand, has given up his cardsharping ways for law school and a career as a lawyer. Norton, on the other hand, just out of prison, is eager to build a new bankroll at the tables. As you might expect, for a number of reasons, Damon cannot stay away from the table forever, and consequently his budding law career and relationship with newcomer Gretchen Mol are both put in peril. The trouble Norton's character (not so subtly nicknamed "Worm") gets into does nothing to make Damon's life easier.

Continue reading: Rounders Review

John Turturro

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John Turturro

Date of birth

28th February, 1957

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.84




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John Turturro Movies

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

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Transformers: The Last Knight Trailer

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Transformers: The Last Knight Super Bowl Trailer

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Exodus: Gods and Kings Movie Review

Aside from impressive 21st century digital effects, this new take on the Moses story pales...

Exodus: Gods and Kings Trailer

Exodus: Gods and Kings Trailer

Director Ridley Scott (Alien, Gladiator, Kingdom of Heaven) talks about world of his new film,...

God's Pocket Movie Review

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Despite a strong sense of the characters and the setting, this film struggles to engage...

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Exodus: Gods And Kings Trailer

Moses and the Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses grew up together as brothers after the former was...

God's Pocket Trailer

God's Pocket Trailer

God's Pocket seems to be an ordinary working class neighbourhood at face value; full of...

Fading Gigolo Movie Review

Fading Gigolo Movie Review

With a witty observational script, amusing characters and a jazzy sense of life in New...

Fading Gigolo Trailer

Fading Gigolo Trailer

Strapped for cash, handsome but middle-aged bookshop worker Fioravante decides to accept an offer of...

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