John Patrick Shanley

John Patrick Shanley

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Stella by Starlight - Arrivals

John Patrick Shanley - Stella by Starlight, The Stella Adler Studio Of Acting's 10th Annual Fundraising Gala - Arrivals at 15 East 27th St - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 11th May 2015

Ethan Hawke, Tom Oppemheim, Kate Mulgrew, Trymaine Lee and John Patrick Shanley

Opening Night After Party for Broadway's Outside Mullingar - Arrivals.

Doug Hughes and John Patrick Shanley - Opening Night after party for Broadway's Outside Mullingar, held at the Copacabana nightclub - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Friday 24th January 2014

John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley, Lynne Meadow and Doug Hughes
John Patrick Shanley, Dearbhla Molloy, Brian F. O'Byrne, Debra Messing, Peter Maloney and Doug Hughes
John Patrick Shanley and Lynne Meadow
John Patrick Shanley and Lynne Meadow

Outside Mullingar Meet and Greet

Doug Hughes, John Aylward, Brian F. O'Byrne, Debra Messing, Dearbhla Molloy and John Patrick Shanley - Meet and greet with the cast of the play Outside Mullingar, held at the Manhattan Theater Club rehearsal space. - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 3rd December 2013

John Aylward, Brian F. O'Byrne, Debra Messing and Dearbhla Molloy
John Aylward

Doubt Review


Excellent
With all due respect, Michael Sheen and Frank Langella aren't exactly names that are going to get butts in seats for Frost/Nixon. But director Ron Howard wisely recruited them for his crisp, concise theatrical adaptation of Peter Morgan's stage drama because they were right for the parts of celebrity journalist David Frost and exiled ex-President Richard Nixon, respectively. They'd originated the roles in London's West End, sharpened their portrayals over hundreds of performances, and established a chemistry that translates beautifully to Howard's film.

When presented with the challenge of adapting his own play, Doubt, for the screen, John Patrick Shanley takes an alternate approach. Gone are Cherry Jones and Brian F. O'Byrne, award-claiming talents who'd shaped Shanley's four-person narrative into a Pulitzer, Tony, and Drama Desk Award winner in 2005. He replaces them here with marquee Hollywood names who have heavy-lifting abilities, and the casting works, though a part of me still wishes Shanley had invited Jones and O'Byrne to usher Doubt to its filmed incarnation.

Continue reading: Doubt Review

Moonstruck Review


OK
A good romantic comedy should be a balm for the soul. Moonstruck doesn't provide that. It's quaint and amusing and full of good performances. It's the kind of movie you can watch with your grandmother and enjoy. The movie is not without its charms. Too bad it doesn't just whisk you into a world of wonder -- it tries to keep you prisoner.

Moonstruck tells the story of Loretta (Cher, in her Academy Award-winning performance), a thirtysomething Brooklyn widow, who is apparently happy in her humdrum life. She lives with her parents, goes to work, and looks for nothing more. Life becomes too difficult when extremes enter the picture. Her fiancé, Johnny (Danny Aiello), fits her life model to a T, a supremely ordinary man in every way, including romance. Loretta has to practically walk him through his proposal, and she always kisses him first. For Loretta, that's fine. She loved her last husband and that caused her nothing but heartache. "When you love them, they drive you crazy," her mother explains.

Continue reading: Moonstruck Review

Live from Baghdad Review


Good
Nothing fascinates the media as much as itself. So it should come as no surprise that one of the best films (so far) about the 1990-91 Gulf War is a drama about the reporters who covered it.

As part of its bid to make 24-hour news an institution, CNN sent producers Robert Wiener (Michael Keaton) and Ingrid Formanek (Helena Bonham Carter) to Baghdad in August 1990 to cover the brutal Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. The HBO film Live from Baghdad is the story of how Wiener and CNN overcame adversity to become the only network to continue broadcasting from Baghdad during the U.S. air strikes.

Continue reading: Live from Baghdad Review

Five Corners Review


Good
This curious indie will keep you guessing -- not because the plot is so complicated, but simply in trying to figure out who all these characters are and what they have to do with one another. At its core, the movie involves John Turturro as a just-outta-prison psycho and Jodie Foster as his once and future stalkee. Tim Robbins appears as her savior, while countless -- countless -- subplots swirl around them. Fun to watch, easy to forget soon after.

Alive Review


Excellent
Ah, the splendid sight of a good movie after a string of bad ones. Understand me, I have seen about five bad movies in a row, and, when I watched Alive, I broke my streak. Perhaps then it is fitting that I should write my review of Alive last (the last of a marathon writing stretch of seven reviews), that is should be my final respite after such a long series of typing.

Alive is the true story of a plane crash that occurred in 1972 in the Andes. Come on, you know what I'm talking about, the one where the survivors had to resort to cannibalism? Yeah, I saw that episode of Seinfeld too. The movie has been parodied way too much for something of its caliber.

Continue reading: Alive Review

John Patrick Shanley

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