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'Luther' Star Idris Elba Will Act As Executive Producer For Fox Remake


Idris Elba Ruth Wilson John Malkovich

Fox are set to remake the hit BBC series Luther.

Luther
Idris Elba starred in Luther.

Read More: Idris Elba Close To Returning For One-Off Special Of Luther.

Continue reading: 'Luther' Star Idris Elba Will Act As Executive Producer For Fox Remake

The Penguins Of Madagascar Trailer


The newest addition to the 'Madagascar' franchise arrives in the form of spin-off 'The Penguins of Madagascar', which centres around the penguin characters, Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private. Details of the plot are yet to be unveiled, but the trailer suggests that in an attempt to save the day, the penguins are interrupted by an elite group of animals known as North Wind, which results in them being stranded in a desert.

Each of the penguins will be voiced by the same actors who played them in the Madagascar films; Tom McGrath as Skipper, Chris Miller as Kowalski, John DiMaggio as Rico and Christopher Knights as Private. In terms of new characters, ever rising star Benedict Cumberbatch voices wolf Classified, the leader of North Wind, while John Malkovich (RED, Being John Malkovich) is the film's octopus antagonist Dr. Octavius Brine. Also, comedy actor Ken Jeong (The Hangover franchise) plays North Wind's explosive and demolition's expert Short Fuse; Annet Mahendru stars as Eva, North Wind's snow owl intelligence analyst; and Peter Stormare is the Norwegian bear Corporal.

The film is directed by Simon J. Smith and Eric Darnell. Darnell has directed all the other films of the 'Madagascar' franchise, as well as 1998's 'Antz'. It's Smith's first time one of the movies, though his previous animation directorials include 'Megamind: The Button Of Doom' and 'Bee Movie'. 

Continue: The Penguins Of Madagascar Trailer

Is 'Crossbones' The Swashbuckling Summer Series To Watch In 2014?


John Malkovich Richard Coyle Claire Foy

Crossbones, the new NBC series starring John Malkovich is due to premiere tonight (30th May). The series follows the world's most famous pirate - Jack Sparrow excluded - Blackbeard AKA Edward Teach and is set to track his infamous life and career.

Crossbones

Malkovich stars as Blackbeard in the lavish production based on Colin Woodard's book The Republic of Pirates and adapted by Neil Cross (Luther) and James V. Hart & Amanda Welles. From what can be gleaned from the trailer and reviews, the series appears to centre on the relationship between Blackbeard and his captive, undercover government agent Tom Lowe (Richard Coyle), and their respective romantic attachments to Selima (Yasmine Al Masri) and Kate (Claire Foy). 

Continue reading: Is 'Crossbones' The Swashbuckling Summer Series To Watch In 2014?

'Red 2' Premieres As Catherine Zeta-Jones Turn Up The Heat [Photos]


Catherine Zeta Jones Helen Mirren Bruce Willis John Malkovich Lee Byung-hun

The stars were out to shine last night in L.A as new movie Red 2 rolled out the red carpet for a premiere party. Catherine Zeta Jones looked particularly glamorous as she strutted her stuff on the carpet on her own, flaunting her exquisite black lace dress.

Catherine Zeta Jones
Catherine Zeta Jones Stunned In Her Lace Gown.

According to The Sun, Helen Mirren and her husband Taylor Hackford engaged in some adorable public displays of affection, looking every inch the loved-up couple with 67 year-old Mirren styled in a particularly trendy fashion in giant Perspex heels under her sleek, green floor-length gown. Bruce Willis and his partner Emma Heming were also feeling the love last night as they snuggled up to one another.

Continue reading: 'Red 2' Premieres As Catherine Zeta-Jones Turn Up The Heat [Photos]

So, Being John Malkovich Means Being A Lifesaver


John Malkovich

If there’s anything cooler than being a world famous actor, it’s being a world famous actor that jumps to people's rescue and saves lives. That’s what John Malkovic did when a man fell and cut his throat badly.

The actor, not usually cast in the role of the hero, had to use all his quick thinking about nous to save Jim Walpole, a retired General Motors car technician from Defiance, Ohio. “Bang, I fell right into the scaffolding along the hotel wall,” Jim said in an interview with the Toronto Sun. Unfortunately for Walpole, he sliced his throat on some metal, making the tumble life threatening. “The blood was coming out so fast,” his wife Marylin exclaimed. Malkovich, arrived at the scene of the accident, and got to work quickly. “He started to press of my neck,” Jim said. “He was trying to stop the bleeding.”

Ben Quinn was just walking by when Malkovich asked him to assist. He didn’t know who it was at the time, but obliged. “The guy really seemed to know what he was doing,” Quinn said. “We didn’t know who he was. I just asked if I could hold the man’s head and he said yes."

Continue reading: So, Being John Malkovich Means Being A Lifesaver

Being Saved By John Malkovich


John Malkovich

Esteemed actor, producer, director and fashion designer, John Malkovich took on another role last week - hero - after he helped a heavily bleeding man who'd fallen over in Toronto.

Ohioans Jim Walpole and his wife Marion were enjoying the last of their cross-Canadian train-trip in Toronto when an innocent sidewalk toe-stubbing turned sinister as Jim fell to the ground. The 77 year-old's fall was impeded by a scaffolding pole, tearing the shocked man's neck as he crashed to the ground, according to ABC News. Blood began to pour from Jim's neck as he cried out for help whilst his mortified wife stood frozen before she too began to scream frantically for help.

Marion, a nurse, recognised her husband's injuries were serious: "The way he was spurting I thought it was the carotid [artery] or the jugular [vein]."

Continue reading: Being Saved By John Malkovich

Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'


Nicholas Hoult Teresa Palmer John Malkovich Christopher Walken Al Pacino Alan Arkin Sylvester Stallone

We’re going to ease in to our round-up of this week’s movie releases, by starting with the ‘above average’ and moving gently down the quality scale, to the truly awful. We already know, by the fact that Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is riding high at the top of the box office, that there is literally no accounting for taste, so we will no longer try to influence your movie-going habits. We will simply present you with the facts and leave you to queue for your popcorn.

First up, Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer star in Warm Bodies, a zombie comedy that gets the laughs from Hoult’s slightly unusual zombie character who decides to save a living human, rather than chomp down on her arteries for a nice snack. Of course, that living human happens to be an attractive young female, in the form of Teresa Palmer (who, for the record, looks a lot like Kristen Stewart in this movie). John Malkovich also stars in this zom-com, which is a little bit ‘Shaun of the Dead,’ (pretending to be a zombie? Been there, done that) but looks like an entertaining way to pass a couple of hours.

Richard Roper of Chicago Sun-Times came up trumps with the most enthusiastic review so far, writing “I kinda love this movie. "Warm Bodies" is a well-paced, nicely directed, post-apocalyptic love story with a terrific sense of humor and the, um, guts to be unabashedly romantic and unapologetically optimistic.” 

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! US Movie Releases: Nicholas Hoult Stars In Zom Com 'Warm Bodies,' Stellar Cast Can't Save 'Stand Up Guys,' Another Stallone Doozy In 'Bullet To The Head'

Hollywood And Religion: Or, How Angus T. Jones Became A Laughing Stock


Angus T. Jones Mel Gibson Joe Eszterhas Tom Cruise John Travolta Angelina Jolie Bruce Willis John Malkovich

When Angus T. Jones recorded his interview with Christopher Hudson, the leader of the Forerunner Chronicles Christian group, he may well not have expected the reaction that he got. The star of the Two and a Half Men sitcom denounced the show as “filth” and urged viewers to stop watching it. Presumably not quite the marketing plan that the show’s executives had in mind (though as we know, these bouts of ‘technically bad’ publicity have a habit of working in your favour) but Angus was keen to share all that he had learned since turning to religion.

In the interview clip, Angus speaks to Hudson as though he is some form of demi-god and looks thrilled to even be in the same room as him, reaching out to touch him as though he can’t believe he’s real. As he very publicly looked a very generous gift horse in the mouth (He earns a reported $350,000 per episode. Yes, per episode), the world winced and cowered away, sniggering. Within hours of the video clip hitting the internet, it had gone viral and the 19 year-old had quickly become a laughing stock.

What exactly was Jones’ biggest crime though? Dissing his employers? Undermining the very thing that gave him the wealth and privilege that he’s able to enjoy? Or was it all the nutty, slightly alarming religious stuff that he was spouting for the majority of the interview? If he’d just said “Two and a Half Men is cr*p,” would we have cared quite as much? Would the story have run quite as far and quite as wide as it did? If there wasn’t that cringe-worthy explanation of why he went on the hunt for a church with a “black gospel theme,” would this all have mattered so much? If he hadn’t starting aligning light entertainment with the devil, because of his newfound religious beliefs? Of course not.

Continue reading: Hollywood And Religion: Or, How Angus T. Jones Became A Laughing Stock

Transformers: Dark Of The Moon Review


Good

With his usual disregard for story logic, Bay plunges us into another deafening metal-against-metal smackdown. Fortunately, this film is a lot more entertaining than Part 2, because it has a more linear plot. And it looks absolutely amazing.

With everything back to normal, Sam (LaBeouf) needs a job to impress his impossibly hot new girlfriend Carly (Huntington-Whiteley). Then strange things start happening around him. Again. And soon he realises that the Decepticons are back to wage war against the Autobot-human alliance. But he has to convince an arrogant government official (McDormand) to let him get involved with his old team (Duhamel, Gibson, Turturro and their Autobot buddies). All of this has something to do with a secret weapon that crashed onto the dark side of the moon in 1961, sparking the space race.

McDormand is easily the best thing about this film, even if her character has a dramatic personality shift halfway through the film. Malkovich is also terrific (as Sam's offbeat new boss), and Dempsey has his moments as well (as Carly's boss and cause of Sam's inferiority complex). Fortunately, the narrative is straightforward enough to give all of the actors the chance to make their mark, distinguishing themselves above the chaos.

Sadly, the same can't be said about the battling robots. While the first-rate animation has a staggering attention to detail, the deafening battles are still impossible to follow. They amount to an eye-catching display of whizzy effects as clanking robots bash each other senseless and destroy everything around them (Chicago gets the full destructive force for a change). Although at least they fit vaguely into the plot this time.

Meanwhile, lapses in even the most twisted logic are plentiful, including the fact that Sam seems to have metallic Transformer bones to resist injury as he's flung into walls and dropped from high places (not to mention Carly's magical white suit and heels). In other words, it's deeply preposterous and almost painfully boyish, but it's nowhere near as muddled as the last chapter. And besides keeping our eyes entertained, there are some great moments throughout the mayhem.

Secretariat Trailer


Penny Chenery never really thought she would take over the family racing stables but as her fathers health started to deteriorate, Penny found herself in just that position. In recent years the team at Meadow Stables found themselves on somewhat of a loosing streak but all that was about to change when a bit of luck started to come their way.

Starting to operate in a male dominated business, Penny and her small team including her loyal and well known trainer Lucien Laurin began to make waves on the racing circuit mainly because their determination and a beautiful chestnut colt named Secretariat which Penny found herself owner of purely by chance.

Continue: Secretariat Trailer

Red Review


OK
Based on the graphic novel, this action-comedy has a wacky tone that's entertaining but never involving. At least the strong all-star cast makes the most of the vivid characters, and the film's visual style keeps us watching even if there's nothing to it.

When "Retired, Extremely Dangerous" Frank Moses (Willis) has his quiet life disrupted by trigger-happy commandos he goes on the run, kidnapping a hapless pension clerk (Parker) to protect her from a ruthless high-tech hitman (Urban) who's chasing him. He then reassembles the old team from his black ops days, including smooth womaniser Joe (Freeman), paranoid nutjob Marvin (Malkovich) and seductive Victoria (Mirren). He even gets in touch with his former Russian nemesis Ivan (Cox). It all has something to do with a scandal involving the American Vice President (McMahon).

Continue reading: Red Review

John Malkovich Monday 11th October 2010 Special screening of Summit Entertainment's 'RED' Los Angeles, California

John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

John Malkovich, Peta Wilson and Walt Disney - John Malkovich with Peta Wilson and son Marlowe Los Angeles, California - Premiere of Walt Disney Pictures' 'Secretariat' held at The El Capitan Theater - Arrivals Thursday 30th September 2010

John Malkovich, Peta Wilson and Walt Disney
John Malkovich and Walt Disney
John Malkovich and Walt Disney
John Malkovich, Peta Wilson and Walt Disney
John Malkovich, Peta Wilson and Walt Disney
John Malkovich and Walt Disney

Red Trailer


What happens to retired agents? Well, most of them retire and leave the life of espionage for something altogether more normal. Frank Moses is one of those guys, in his time he was one of the CIA's top black ops agents but now he's left his old life behind him for retirement, there's one slight problem with Frank's retirement plan, his CIA file has been marked RED, Retired and Extremely Dangerous. Frank and his old work colleagues must reunite and find answers to why they've become the CIA's most wanted.

Continue: Red Trailer

Jonah Hex Trailer


Jonah Hex is a brand new comic book adaptation directed by Jimmy Hayward and starring Josh Brolin, John Malkovich and Megan Fox.

Continue: Jonah Hex Trailer

Disgrace Review


Very Good
Slow-paced and quietly involving, this drama, based on a JM Coetzee novel, is so packed with big issues that it sometimes feels like a bit too much. But it's provocative and fascinating, and never offers any easy answers.

David (Malkovich) is a professor at a Cape Town university who shocks the community with his unrepentant attitude toward a manipulative affair he has with a student (Engel). Shamed into leaving his post, he goes to live with his daughter Lucy (Haines) on her remote farm, where he helps Lucy's friend Bev (Press) in her work at a local animal sanctuary. After a nasty event, David is unnerved to discover that Lucy has given some land to her farmhand Petrus (Ebouaney) and that she's happy for Petrus to have the upper hand.

Continue reading: Disgrace Review

John Malkovich - John Malkovich (poster art) Madrid, Spain - Press conference to announce Moet & Chandon Benefit Auction, held at Circulo de Bellas Artes Monday 30th November 2009

John Malkovich

Mutant Chronicles Review


Terrible
She's become something of an icon in the worst possible sense. Glowering in the background, her face a mask of fury, her eyes piercing and yet remote, this young woman is almost always adept in both samurai-styled swordplay as well as gymnastics skills that rival anything seen on Earth. She speaks little, never dates, and almost always has a torturous family history. You've seen her kicking her way through almost every futuristic action film to hit screens this decade -- from The Matrix to The Chronicles of Riddick. Meet the new sci-fi femme fatale. She's been exclusively designed by Tinseltown engineers to whet the appetites (and other parts) of the largely male, Internet-based fanboy universe.

And God is she getting dull.

Continue reading: Mutant Chronicles Review

The Great Buck Howard Review


OK
How can a film that features a lofty tribute to The Amazing Kreskin before the end credits go wrong? Well, in Sean McGinly's sweet and mushy comedy The Great Buck Howard, the film doesn't really go wrong... but then it doesn't really go right either.

The film celebrates the D-list world of third-rate celebrities, celebrities whose popularity has waned, whose 15 minutes of fame were over a long time ago, with one-night stands not in Vegas or L.A., but Bakersfield and Akron.

Continue reading: The Great Buck Howard Review

Burn After Reading Review


Very Good
In 24 years, they've directed only 13 films, so it's not hard to assume that the Coen brothers (Joel and Ethan) intend to make every one of them count. Of course, when they actually do, cinematic classics (Fargo, No Country for Old Men) usually result. But sometimes, the Coens simply want to play with the language of film, albeit to limited (Intolerable Cruelty) or unnecessary (their remake of The Ladykillers) effect. While not one of their masterpieces, Burn After Reading indicates that, even in the clichéd arena of affairs of the heart, the boys are capable of something subversive, and quite special.

When a disc filled with what appears to be sensitive government information ends up in the hands of two desperate health club employees, a blackmail plot is hatched. Seems personal trainer Linda (Frances McDormand) wants plastic surgery, convinced it will change her dating life, and airheaded co-worker Chad (Brad Pitt) thinks he's found a way to fund it. All they have to do is find the owner of the data and ask for cash.`What they don't know is that the statistics are not classified secrets, but financial figures stolen from CIA analyst Osborne Cox (John Malkovich). Lifted by his wife Katie (Tilda Swinton), it's part of a planned divorce. Once free, she can hook up with married boyfriend and tripwire Treasury agent Harry Pfarrer (George Clooney). He's a sex addict, and has several women on the side -- including Linda. Naturally, when Osborne finally discovers what is happening, he sets several deadly plots in motion.

Continue reading: Burn After Reading Review

John Malkovich and David Letterman Tuesday 2nd September 2008 outside the Ed Sullivan Theater for the 'Late Show With David Letterman' New York City, USA

John Malkovich and David Letterman
John Malkovich and David Letterman
John Malkovich and David Letterman
John Malkovich and David Letterman
John Malkovich and David Letterman

In The Line Of Fire Review


Good
Clint Eastwood was a legend a long time before Wolfgang Petersen decided to cast him as an aging Secret Service agent trying to derail a psychopath who's trying to assassinate the President. But Petersen's movie, titled In the Line of Fire, benefits immensely from his history and his presence, his ironclad persona as last man standing. Sporting a well-cut suit jacket rather than a poncho and a pair of holsters, Eastwood's steely resolve still has the power to rejuvenate otherwise rote plot conventions with every sliver of his gravelly voice, as if questioning his opponents' manhood with every flick of an adverb.

Eastwood plays Frank Horrigan, the kind of man who comes home after a long day of booby-trapping money counterfeiters and wants nothing else than to get out of his suit, drink a good glass of bourbon, and listen to Kind of Blue. Just as he's settling into one of these comfortable slumps, he receives a phone call from a man who calls himself Booth (John Malkovich). Sober and staid, Booth tells Frank that he's going to kill the president. The fact that Booth's deserted apartment is found with a singular photo of Frank when he was an agent under JFK underlines Horrigan's conviction.

Continue reading: In The Line Of Fire Review

Juno Review


Excellent
Ellen Page plays a quirky teenager in Jason Reitman's Juno but she does so in a way I've rarely witnessed before. She's not rebelling from medication like Natalie Portman in Garden State, nor is she just a normal, shy girl who is externally quirky like Tina Majorino in Napoleon Dynamite. Her peculiarities aren't her definition like Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club, and she's not flippantly cute and brazenly poetic like Zooey Deschanel in Paul Gordon Green's All the Real Girls. Page's Juno MacGuff certainly has hints of all these characters, but what we witness of her comes from somewhere far off-screen. Remarkably, the world we're watching doesn't revolve around her.

When this Argento-loving firecracker gets knocked up by Paulie Bleeker (the invaluable Michael Cera), her rhythms don't change much; a big cookie consumed simultaneously with a lamb kebob seems like something she'd eat even if her hormones weren't all akimbo. After chatting up an ex-pill popper/current pro-lifer, her attempts to procure an abortion are thwarted by the thought of her baby's tapping fingernails and the sterilized miasma of the clinic's waiting room. Hastily, she opts for an old-fashioned, at-birth adoption with no frills. Her parents, played lovingly by J.K. Simmons and Allison Janney, are concerned but surprisingly level-headed, even if they wished she had just gotten a DUI instead of getting knocked up.

Continue reading: Juno Review

Mason Novick and John Malkovich - Mason Novick, John Malkovich and Lianne Halfon Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles premiere of "Juno" at Mann's Village Theater Monday 3rd December 2007

Mason Novick and John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

Beowulf Review


OK
From the advent of sound with 1927's The Jazz Singer to the computer-generated effects breakthrough of 1989's The Abyss -- advancements in technology have had a major impact on cinematic storytelling, for better and worse. New technologies open up more cinematic experiences and new avenues for directors and actors to explore their craft. But it's easy to get caught up in the razzmatazz of the latest spectacle, instead of focusing on age-old, tried and true thematic substance. And that's exactly Beowulf's tragic flaw.

The Beowulf legend originates from a 700 A.D. oral tradition that was adapted in epic poem form by the English and into film form by director Robert Zemeckis -- using motion-captured live-action performances that are turned into a computer-generated light show. Much like the IMAX 3D screenings of Zemeckis' previous effort, The Polar Express, Beowulf's tale of a hero who comes to rid a Scandinavian village of its monster, while screaming his name every chance he gets, is more a showcase for RealD technology than an engaging film.

Continue reading: Beowulf Review

John Malkovich Monday 5th November 2007 Premiere of 'Beowulf' at Mann's Village Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

John Malkovich - Sunday 4th November 2007 at Arclight Theater Los Angeles, California

John Malkovich
Javier Bardem and John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

John Malkovich Sunday 23rd September 2007 John Malkovich on the film set for ' Burn After Reading ' in Manhattan New York City, USA

John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

John Malkovich Sunday 23rd September 2007 on the movie set of 'Burn After Reading' filmed at Riverside Park New York City, USA

John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich
John Malkovich

Colour Me Kubrick: A True...ish Story Review


OK
Talk about your reputation preceding you. In Alan Conway's case, however, it wasn't his reputation, but that of a certain notoriously elusive filmmaker named Stanley Kubrick. Brian Cook's Colour Me Kubrick: A True...ish Story follows the true-life exploits of a down-and-out, gay boozehound who managed, by passing himself off as Kubrick, to gain adoration and material support from a cross-section of London's gay artists and culture vultures in the 1990s. Of course, suspicion eventually caught up with Conway and his cover was blown by a Vanity Fair article and a police investigation that followed his trail of hoodwink and swindle.

Playing Conway-as-Kubrick is John Malkovich. He's the main attraction here, and for all of Colour Me Kubrick's considerable flaws, you can't take your eyes off Malkovich's flamboyant take on Conway. Depending on whom Conway's trying to hustle -- whether it's Jasper (Richard E. Grant), a hard-luck restaurateur; Rupert (Luke Mably), a studly would-be fashion designer; or Lee Pratt (Jim Davidson), a cut-rate Tom Jones-wannabe -- we see him adapting wildly different variations on the "Kubrick" persona. He's the sly English fop for the gay scenesters, or a variation on the brash, business-minded American (often with a shrill Brooklyn accent) for the investors and entertainers. Always, though, he dresses with the sensibility of a natty, low-rent hipster -- as if Kubrick must dress dowdily, yet with an impeccable sense of thrift-store chic. Conway's coup de grace involves conning the aforementioned Pratt, the English crooner, into believing he -- Kubrick -- is going to help him score a show in Vegas. After Pratt calls his bluff, the balance of Conway's vodka-loving life is spent in a rehab facility for the fancy rich. What we marvel at, beyond the gullibility of his victims, is how Conway is always playing a role, and getting away with it, right up to the very end.

Continue reading: Colour Me Kubrick: A True...ish Story Review

The Libertine Review


Very Good
It seems that Johnny Depp, who may be our most consistently dazzling actor, will forever be nominated for his lesser roles. No one of major merit nominated him for Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, or Ted Demme's Blow but we sure as hell will nominate him for playing a drunk, silly pirate. How does our strongest actor's most gritty, complex role get snuffed? Hell, even his performance in Ed Wood, his best performance, only scored a Golden Globe nomination. Don't expect his latest in Laurence Dunmore's The Libertine to go anywhere past his British Independent Film Awards nod. There's a better chance of his performance as Willy Wonka getting a nomination 'round these parts.

Depp plays John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester, about as depraved and destructive a dissident as there ever was in 17th century England. Besides his duties as an Earl, Wilmot was also a poet, playwright and acting teacher. He married Elizabeth Malet (Rosamund Pike), a woman he tried to kidnap only 2 year prior to marriage, and wrote plays that openly mocked King Charles (a business-as-usual John Malkovich) in his plays and poems, likening him to dildos and limp phalluses. Tell me you wouldn't love to party with this guy. Before he got syphilis and fell apart (literally), he had a short affair with an actress, Elizabeth Barry (the radiant Samantha Morton). Dunmore's film supposes that Wilmot had great emotions for Barry and that her leaving him was what made him die emotionally while syphilis ate away his body.

Continue reading: The Libertine Review

Art School Confidential Review


Excellent
Few things are more mystifying to outsiders than the world of modern art. Which of course makes it the perfect backdrop for a Terry Zwigoff film. Where else is eccentricity, flamboyance, and pretension considered normal? And who's more alienated and misunderstood than an art student rejected by his art school classmates, who are, quite naturally, alienated and misunderstood themselves? Art School Confidential, Zwigoff's latest, mines this territory for humor and poignancy, raising questions about the nature of art and alienation.As in Zwigoff's previous films, which include Crumb, Ghost World, and Bad Santa, Art School's hero is far from heroic. Played by Max Minghella, with his dark eyes and brooding bushy brows, Jerome Platz is a young art student whose primary aspiration is to be the greatest artist of the 21st century, the next Picasso. His secondary concern -- to find an emotional, intellectual, erotic connection with a woman -- proves even more ambitious since he feels only one girl, luminous art model Audrey (Sophia Myles), is worthy of his attention.The trouble is, after an initial connection with Jerome, Audrey shifts her attention to another freshman painter, the hunky Jonah, whose simple, innocent paintings have turned him into something of a campus hero. In order to win Audrey back, Jerome asks for the help of Jimmy (Jim Broadbent), a bitter, reclusive, alcoholic painter. Broadbent's performance is the film's strongest, which is saying something in a film packed with celebrated actors. His Jimmy is sensitive and fearsome, wise, and terrible -- all at once. At several points in the film, during fits of artistic pique, Jimmy's eyes flash with anger and fix on Jerome -- and the misery of a rotten, wasted life paralyzes both Jerome and the audience. The jolting power of these moments, of Broadbent's poisonous eyes, makes his turn a thing to behold.Jerome's classmates and instructors at the Strathmore Institute figure prominently in the film's wry exploration of what makes good art good, and what makes the truest art timeless. Professor Sandiford (John Malkovich) is a failed painter who is unable to see Jerome's talent and potential but wouldn't mind sleeping with him. Jerome's roommate Vince (Ethan Suplee, of TV's My Name Is Earl) is a fast-talking, sexually obsessed film student. And Jerome's friend Bardo is a talentless, wayward womanizer who doesn't belong in art school. Several heavyweight actors play the bit parts that round out the cast, including Angelica Huston as a sage art history professor, Steve Buscemi as a freewheeling gallery owner, and Michael Lerner as a greedy art dealer.Art School marks Zwigoff's second collaboration with Daniel Clowes, who wrote both the screenplay and the graphic novel on which it was based. Their first collaboration, the 2001 film Ghost World, earned them an avalanche of critical praise and an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. However, Art School isn't as good as Ghost World, despite their abundant similarities. The connection between the central characters in Ghost World, Thora Birch's Enid and Buscemi's Seymour, was fascinating, odd, and easily understood. Jerome and Audrey's relationship, meanwhile, never takes shape, partly because Audrey's character is completely lifeless. Zwigoff and Clowes never get around to showing us who she is or what she wants. It's never clear why she would turn her back on Jerome to pursue Jonah when she knows better than anyone that Jerome is the real talent.Such problems keep Art School from the heights of achievement of Ghost World and Crumb, but don't keep it from being a provocative, entertaining movie. Art School will go down as a minor work from the maker of off-kilter gems.Between you and me...

The Object Of Beauty Review


Bad
Back in 1991, Andie MacDowell was even worse of an actress than she is today. Much worse. Terrible, really. For the proof, check her out in this post-sex, lies, and videotape outing with John Malkovich in a story about -- get this -- a statuette that gets stolen from their hotel room nightstand. By a deaf mute cleaning lady. That's the object of beauty, I guess, and this movie is about as good as any that would put the word "object" in the title. Boring at its best and incomprehensible at its worst, this is one film you can easily pass up.

The Libertine Review


Very Good
It seems that Johnny Depp, who may be our most consistently dazzling actor, will forever be nominated for his lesser roles. No one of major merit nominated him for Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, or Ted Demme's Blow but we sure as hell will nominate him for playing a drunk, silly pirate. How does our strongest actor's most gritty, complex role get snuffed? Hell, even his performance in Ed Wood, his best performance, only scored a Golden Globe nomination. Don't expect his latest in Laurence Dunmore's The Libertine to go anywhere past his British Independent Film Awards nod. There's a better chance of his performance as Willy Wonka getting a nomination 'round these parts.

Depp plays John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester, about as depraved and destructive a dissident as there ever was in 17th century England. Besides his duties as an Earl, Wilmot was also a poet, playwright and acting teacher. He married Elizabeth Malet (Rosamund Pike), a woman he tried to kidnap only 2 year prior to marriage, and wrote plays that openly mocked King Charles (a business-as-usual John Malkovich) in his plays and poems, likening him to dildos and limp phalluses. Tell me you wouldn't love to party with this guy. Before he got syphilis and fell apart (literally), he had a short affair with an actress, Elizabeth Barry (the radiant Samantha Morton). Dunmore's film supposes that Wilmot had great emotions for Barry and that her leaving him was what made him die emotionally while syphilis ate away his body.

Continue reading: The Libertine Review

The Sheltering Sky Review


OK
Bertolucci's grand desert epic gets stuck in the sand right at the start. Its idling husband-wife leads practically assure us of that: They're headed to Africa -- to nowhere in particular -- to while away a year or two. They aren't tourists, they're travelers. But, are Debra Winger and John Malkovich actors you'd remotely associate with such a grand adventure? Or getting lost in "sensual" overload and the pleasures of the flesh? Winger as the concubine of an Arab traveler? The plot is so strange and absurd -- all to get to the point that the desert makes you crazy -- that we're left with nothing but staring at the dusty landscapes, which, as usual, Bertolucci has quite a knack with. Still, we've seen the lovely desert many times before in the movies, and those films have much better stories attached.

Beyond The Clouds Review


Good
Michelangelo Antonioni obsesses on the naked bodies of a good half-dozen Euro-stars in this wandering tour of western European sexual relations in various combinations. Based on a collection of his own short stories, Antonioni connects four such tales (infidelity, happenstance, old-fashioned horniness, etc.) with the narrative of a film director (John Malkovich) who's looking for a story to base his next movie on. We find we're lucky enough if we can just get one story out of this two-hour ordeal, which wanders aimlessly in art-house hell as often as it enchants.

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Dangerous Liaisons Review


Extraordinary
Until The Quiet American, this was only decent thing Christopher Hampton had ever written, and why shouldn't he, he had the source material to help him. The film famously follows backstabbing and intrigue in France, 200 or so years ago, as kissing cousins place a bet over whether Valmont (John Malkovich) can land prissy Marie (Michelle Pfeiffer), ruining countless lives along the way. It would be almost perfect if it wasn't for southern belle Swoosie Kurtz mucking up the works. Probably the best adaptation of the celebrated novel you can find.

Adaptation Review


Excellent
Wrap your noodle around this one. Real-life screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (Being John Malkovich; Human Nature) writes a screenplay about screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) writing a screenplay adaptation of a real-life book, The Orchid Thief, written by real-life author Susan Orlean (played in Adaptation by Meryl Streep).

Thus spake Adaptation. Starting out with fake (or real?) behind-the-scenes footage of Malkovich, taking detours to the dawn of life on earth and story mogul Robert McKee's screenwriting class, Darwin's lab, Orlean's book (with Chris Cooper playing the swamp rat/scientist/orchid thief himself), voice-overs, and flashbacks, Adaptation finds inventive convolutions that might make it seem more esoteric than it really is.

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Time Regained Review


Excellent
A literal adaptation of the final book of Marcel Proust's Remembrances of Things Past would be inconceivable and boring, since the tastes and smells which reveal layers of memory cannot be captured onscreen. Raoul Ruiz's Time Regained does the next best thing. Ruiz weaves a fragmented, experimental narrative in the form of a tapestry. There's an uncanny beauty achieved by telling his story in this manner, which reveals thoughts and inactions by using the very limitations of the film medium. He presents us with a series of photographs, or images shot into mirrors or through doorways which open up to the past and present (and cross-cut between the two with relative ease.)

Taking place within the huge estates and manor houses of the cultural elite, with string quartets playing in their studies and tiny cakes neatly arranged on trays in their kitchens, our main character, Marcel (Marcelo Mazzarello) wanders through this world drinking it in. The plot is inconsequential, it is more about observing the crowded rooms and bitten back emotions, the sips of wine and soft handshakes. Every now and then, Marcel is forced to confront his decadent relatives (sneeringly funny John Malkovich and sour Pascal Greggory.)

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I'm Going Home Review


Extraordinary
Released in 2002, at a time when its director was 92 years old, Manoel de Oliveira's I'm Coming Home is a masterpiece by a director whose previous works (and subsequent ones; he's made a couple films since, with another in production) can be hard to get your hands on outside of his home countries of Portugal and France. It's a shame; watching I'm Coming Home, you develop a pressing desire to sample more of de Oliveira's work. The Milestone DVD release of I'm Coming Home (with a useful commentary track by film historian Richard Peña and an interview with the director) is thus a cause for celebration all the more.

What emerges first watching I'm Coming Home is de Oliveira's extraordinary and serene cinematic style. The story is that of a successful and respected Parisian actor named Gilbert Valence (Michel Piccoli), a 76 year-old, who, in the film's opening scenes, loses his wife and daughter in an auto crash. We then take up with him a few months later as he goes about the day-to-day business of tending his orphaned grandson Serge and maintaining the routine he's reestablished in his life. When an American director (John Malkovich) casts Valence as the much, much younger Buck Mulligan in a film adaptation of James Joyce's Ulysses, the forced scrutiny of his age challenges Valence's emotional equilibrium and causes him to reevaluate his mortality and recent loss.

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Ripley's Game Review


Very Good
Did this movie ever come out theatrically? I would have at least thought it would have found its way here on video, but no, I discovered Ripley's Game on IFC, of all places. This follow-up to The Talented Mr. Ripley (no cast or crew involved, but it's based on another Patricia Highsmith book (the third of five) about Tom Ripley) stars John Malkovich in the role of the older Ripley, this time working as a forged art dealer and relatively callous, spare-time murderer. Ripley convinces a dying man (Dougray Scott) to commit a murder for him, after which all hell breaks loose. Malkovich steals the show and director Liliana Cavani (The Night Porter) does a perfectly serviceable job. See also The American Friend -- Malkovich makes a way better Ripley than Dennis Hopper.

Mulholland Falls Review


OK
Just so you know, there are no waterfalls in Los Angeles. The titular Mulholland Falls refers to the smarmy practice of taking a criminal to the high point of the mountainous Mulholland Drive and booting him off, only to catch up with him sometime later at the bottom.

Mulholland Falls is the preferred method of ridding 1950s L.A. of unwanted baddies, and it is most often used by a foursome of elite cops: Nick Nolte, Chazz Palminteri, Chris Penn, and Michael Madsen. Their newest mission: to find the murderer of Allison (Jennifer Connelly), a girl whose bizarre death leads the gang to a General (John Malkovich) at the Atomic Energy Commission and his number one thug (Treat Williams).

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The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review


OK
Milla J., stick to the singing career.

Luc Besson, imaginative mind behind such notable works of art such as The Professional, La Femme Nikita, and The Big Blue, has created such a memorable mess of things with his newest release, The Messenger. A car crash of a movie headed straight for the Days of Heaven territory.

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Ghost World Review


Excellent
It's been seven years since director Terry Zwigoff impressed moviegoers with his documentary Crumb, an uncomfortable look at pop comic artist R. Crumb and his disturbing, grotesque, dysfunctional family. Zwigoff's ability to make viewers squirm and laugh at the same time is again in full bloom, with the fictional Ghost World, a funny, sympathetic look at a whole new group of awkward, unhappy people.

Based on a comic/graphic novel by Daniel Clowes (who co-wrote the screenplay adaptation with Zwigoff), Ghost World provides the point-of-view of young Enid, just out of high school, and aimless in both direction and identity. In the able hands of Thora Birch, who's already suffered the ennui of suburbia in American Beauty, Enid is a caustic, sarcastic, yet charming, sweetie. Birch is in practically every scene of the film, and anchors it with perfect tone.

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Johnny English Review


Bad
Rowan Atkinson is a very funny man. Unfortunately, though his British television shows Mr. Bean and Black Adder have drawn cult audiences the world over, he just can't seem to translate this magic to the silver screen.

Johnny English (Atkinson) is a third-string spy working for British intelligence. When his uncontrollable bungling blows up all of England's first- and second-string spies, English is the only hope to save the precious crown jewels (and his country) from the plot of evil French mastermind Pascal Sauvage (John Malkovich). Along the way, fellow spy Lorna Campbell (Natalie Imbruglia -- okay, so English isn't really the last spy in Britain, which raises questions best left unanswered) steps in to give English and his less moronic assistant, Bough (Ben Miller), a hand.

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Shadow Of The Vampire Review


Excellent
In this age of digital filmmaking, Shadow of the Vampire is a love letter to the beautiful mechanism of a motion picture camera. There's something both tactile and mysterious about images created on a thin sliver of film guided through a series of loops and pins. The final product is run through another instrument with wheels and sprockets, the projector. As the movie flickers across a silver screen, it's not too much of a stretch imagining the director whispering, "I gave you life."

That's the implied joke throughout Shadow of the Vampire, the strange and fanciful projection of what might have occurred during production of that classic 1922 German horror film, Nosferatu - A Symphony of Terror.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Very Good
Tolkein geeks have The Lord of the Rings. I have The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. One of my most beloved book series as a youth (I still carry a towel in my trunk thanks to its advice), I even sat through (and enjoyed) the cheesy BBC miniseries made from the novels. So just so you know what you're getting into with this review: I'm a self-confessed overgrown fanboy on this one.

Decades in the making, Guide has been embroiled in controversy since the very beginning. The most recent round of complaints have covered pretty much the entire film, from casting (Mos Def taking a role commonly envisioned as a sort of British dandy) to directing (Garth Jennings is a music video veteran), to choice of writer Karey Kirkpatrick (a kiddie flick screenwriter best known for Chicken Run but also the writer of disastrous flicks The Little Vampire and Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves). Out of this, we've all been promised, genius would spring.

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Being John Malkovich Review


Good
The question on everybody's lips would be: Why John Malkovich?

The centerpiece of Being John Malkovich, in case you haven't guessed, is a portal, which provides the unique opportunity to "be John Malkovich." As one character, when approached with the chance, exuberantly improvises, "Great! That was my second choice." Which leads us right back where we started. Why John Malkovich?

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Knockaround Guys Review


Weak
Warning to Vin Diesel fans: Regardless of what the marketing surrounding the crime drama Knockaround Guys may tell you, Diesel, Hollywood's new action hero, is not the star of this film. He, of the deep voice and bulging biceps, is a featured player but has only moderate screen time -- he's even billed after Barry Pepper (*61, Saving Private Ryan). If you're hoping or expecting to see something like XXX, well... then see XXX again.

What you'll get with Knockaround Guys is another knock-off of a gangster film, 90 minutes of phony tough guy bravado, stagy dialogue, laughably inaccurate accents and, most inexcusably, a slow-moving story. This may all explain why Diesel isn't the lead in this chest-thumper: The film was made before his breakout success and has reportedly been sitting on the shelf at New Line. It must now be time to take advantage of his star -- and box office -- power.

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John Malkovich

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John Malkovich

Date of birth

9th December, 1953

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83


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John Malkovich Movies

The Wilde Wedding Movie Review

The Wilde Wedding Movie Review

An A-list cast goes a long way to making this goofy ensemble comedy a lot...

Unlocked Movie Review

Unlocked Movie Review

By injecting a steady sense of fun, this slick but mindless action thriller both holds...

Unlocked Trailer

Unlocked Trailer

Alice Racine (Noomi Rapace) is a CIA interrogator who gets embroiled in a terrorist plot...

Deepwater Horizon Movie Review

Deepwater Horizon Movie Review

This reunion of actor Mark Wahlberg and director Peter Berg feels like a natural successor...

Deepwater Horizon Trailer

Deepwater Horizon Trailer

Deepwater Horizon is an American disaster film that is based upon the true story of...

Cut Bank Trailer

Cut Bank Trailer

Dwayne McLaren is an ambitious high school graduate, whose success on the football field led...

Penguins of Madagascar Trailer

Penguins of Madagascar Trailer

Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private return from Madagascar with their own adventure as formidable and...

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The Penguins Of Madagascar Trailer

The Penguins Of Madagascar Trailer

The newest addition to the 'Madagascar' franchise arrives in the form of spin-off 'The Penguins...

Cesar Chavez Trailer

Cesar Chavez Trailer

'Cesar Chavez' is the inspirational story of the celebrated American Mexican, labour leader and civil...

RED 2 Movie Review

RED 2 Movie Review

That A-list cast of "retired, extremely dangerous" spies is back, coasting through another amiable but...

Red 2 Trailer

Red 2 Trailer

Following the perilous events of the first movie, former CIA agent Frank Moses tries yet...

Warm Bodies Trailer

Warm Bodies Trailer

A young male zombie spends his days roaming the barren and devastated wasteland that is...

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Movie Review

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Movie Review

Spikier than the average coming-of-age movie, this astute comedy-drama is packed with memorable characters and...

Transformers: Dark of the Moon Movie Review

Transformers: Dark of the Moon Movie Review

With his usual disregard for story logic, Bay plunges us into another deafening metal-against-metal smackdown....

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