John Landis

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Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer


In the 1970s came the most controversial and accessible comedy ever seen. The National Lampoon was a magazine featuring some of the most socially terrifying taboos and became a groundbreaking publication in the world of American humour. Unafraid were the editors to approach subjects regarding politics, war, sex, drugs and culture, and nothing was allowed to stay censored; it was, indeed, best known for the highly outrageous cover art that ranged from parodic images of Van Gogh and Hitler to a gun threat against a dog. From pages full of laughs came a multimedia comedic world with radio shows, music and television all spawning from that one paper. The most memorable incarnations of the Lampoon were the 'Animal House', 'Class Reunion' and 'Vacation' movies which took the whole franchise to a new level of fame.

Continue: Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer

Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards

Deborah Nadoolman Landis and John Landis - Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards - Arrivals at Paramount Theater, Paramount Studio - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 14th February 2015

Deborah Nadoolman Landis and John Landis
Rick Baker and John Landis

Launch dinner for the new Hollywood Costume exhibition at the V&A Museum

John Landis Tuesday 16th October 2012 Launch dinner for the new Hollywood Costume exhibition at the V&A Museum

Launch dinner for the new Hollywood Costume exhibition at the V&A Museum

John Landis and Deborah Nadoolman Landis - John Landis and Deborah Nadoolman Landis Tuesday 16th October 2012 Launch dinner for the new Hollywood Costume exhibition at the V&A Museum

John Landis and Deborah Nadoolman Landis
John Landis and Deborah Nadoolman Landis

at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

John Landis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Thursday 12th April 2012 at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

John Landis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

John Landis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - John Landis; Deborah Landis Thursday 12th April 2012 at the TCM Classic Film Festival opening night premiere of the 40th anniversary restoration of 'Cabaret' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

John Landis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project Review


Weak
At the New York Film Festival screening of John Landis' Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project, subversion was in the air as Landis strolled out to introduce the film and, peering into the audience, asked William Lustig, the director of Maniac Cop, to take a bow. The excitement continued when the lights dimmed and Harry Dean Stanton in the film began warbling "Old Blue" in Dan Tana's Restaurant. Landis' camera then picks up Rickles' empty dressing room at the Stardust in a series of masterly composed shots of vacant chairs and silent bric-a-brac -- Ozu in Vegas. But then banality set in.

Landis very quickly assumes the role of the Los Angeles Chapter President of The Don Rickles Fan Club. Legions of comics and actors are trotted out (much in the manner of The Aristocrats) to praise the brilliance and hilarity of the master of the comic insult. These interviews are interspersed with clips from Rickles' films -- Kelly's Heroes, Run Silent, Run Deep, The Rat Race, X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes, Beach Blanket Bingo -- along with television excerpts from The Tonight Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. The Man Himself is interviewed and asked to comment on his life and art. Centering the whole mishmash is footage of Rickles' nightclub act at the Stardust -- an act Rickles had heretofore adamantly refused to be filmed.

Continue reading: Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project Review

Mr. Warmth:The Don Rickles Project Review


Weak
At the New York Film Festival screening of John Landis' Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project, subversion was in the air as Landis strolled out to introduce the film and, peering into the audience, asked William Lustig, the director of Maniac Cop, to take a bow. The excitement continued when the lights dimmed and Harry Dean Stanton in the film began warbling "Old Blue" in Dan Tana's Restaurant. Landis' camera then picks up Rickles' empty dressing room at the Stardust in a series of masterly composed shots of vacant chairs and silent bric-a-brac -- Ozu in Vegas. But then banality set in.

Landis very quickly assumes the role of the Los Angeles Chapter President of The Don Rickles Fan Club. Legions of comics and actors are trotted out (much in the manner of The Aristocrats) to praise the brilliance and hilarity of the master of the comic insult. These interviews are interspersed with clips from Rickles' films -- Kelly's Heroes, Run Silent, Run Deep, The Rat Race, X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes, Beach Blanket Bingo -- along with television excerpts from The Tonight Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. The Man Himself is interviewed and asked to comment on his life and art. Centering the whole mishmash is footage of Rickles' nightclub act at the Stardust -- an act Rickles had heretofore adamantly refused to be filmed.

Continue reading: Mr. Warmth:The Don Rickles Project Review

Twilight Zone: The Movie Review


Good
I saw Twilight Zone: The Movie when it came out in 1983. My dad, brother and I wandered into the theatre late and assumed we missed the beginning of the film. Instead of the familiar Twilight Zone intro, here were two guys (Dan Aykroyd and Albert Brooks) yukking it up in a car. After a few minutes of on-screen banter, my dad leans over to me and says, "I think we're in the wrong movie."

We decide to stick it out and sure enough, Aykroyd turns to Brooks and says, "Do you want to see something really scary?" Brooks agrees and the rest is scary movie history. Cue audience screams. We were, indeed, in the right movie.

Continue reading: Twilight Zone: The Movie Review

Susan's Plan Review


Grim
Yea, and the masses cried for a time when John Landis would once again make a passable movie instead of doing direct-to-cable crap like this. Amen.

Continue reading: Susan's Plan Review

An American Werewolf In London Review


Extraordinary
In early February, I found myself at a pub in New York City. All right, so this is American and here we call pubs "bars", but, since I was with a bunch of Yorkshire Brits at the time, we called it a pub. Said pub, located somewhere in the Village (we had been walking about all day and had about zero clue where the hell we were, but I remember observing Dean & Deluca's just a bit before, which meant that NYU couldn't be far off), had a name that I should have immediately picked up on: "The Slaughtered Lamb."

Like the American backpackers in the movie from which "The Slaughtered Lamb" derives its name, I simply muttered "what the bloody hell kinda name for a pub is 'The Slaughtered Lamb'." Regardless, we entered. On the wall, by what may be perhaps the tiniest bathroom in all of Manhattan, is a poster of An American Werewolf in London.

Continue reading: An American Werewolf In London Review

The Blues Brothers Review


Essential
The Blues Brothers has been re-released on DVD for its 25th anniversary. You've probably seen it countless times between its 1980 release and repeat airings on TV, so you know the basics. Still, here are 25 reminders why you have to see it again.

1) The music is great, coming from a legendary line-up of soul and blues artists: James Brown, Aretha Franklin, John Lee Hooker, Cab Calloway, and Ray Charles, whose performance of "Shake a Tail Feather" will get you dancing with the horde of extras onscreen.

Continue reading: The Blues Brothers Review

Blues Brothers 2000 Review


Unbearable
Belushi is rolling in his grave, can't you feel it?

Unreedemable schlock, Blues Brothers 2000 is a blatant ripoff of the original. The script is virtually stolen verbatim, only perverted and twisted to seem different, while simultaneously robbing the film of all its originality, humor, wit, fire, and anything else that would make it watchable.

Continue reading: Blues Brothers 2000 Review

John Landis

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