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The Golden Globes Nominations, No Surprises For A Great Year Of Film


Quentin Tarantino Leonardo Dicaprio Daniel Day Lewis Rachel Weisz Naomi Watts Helen Mirren Richard Gere John Hawkes Joaquin Phoenix Denzel Washington Maggie Smith Michelle Dockery Ben Affleck Marion Cotillard Christoph Waltz Ang Lee

The Golden Globes are one of the biggest film and television awards in the world. Winning an award from them will almost always top the C.V.s of anyone involved in film. 2012 has been one of the best years in film for a long time, with many films being deemed 'instant classics'. Although, of course, that's said every year, with just a quick glance at the calibre of performances, narrative and cinematography this year it's easy to see why it's being said.

2012's nominations were revealed today with few surprises. The favourites during speculation included Argo, Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty and The Master, and they haven't failed to impress in the Globes' nominations. Lincoln's set to be a big winner with seven nominations, while Argo has 5 nominations, Zero Dark Thirty has 4 and The Master has 3. All four, except The Master, are also in the running for Best Motion Picture, competing alongside Ang Lee's Life of Pi and Quentin Tarantino's re-envisioning of a slave narrative, Django Unchained

Tarantino's film received 5 nominations, which included two in the category for Best Supporting Performance by an Actor, for Christoph Waltz and Leonardo Dicaprio, which proves to us that it's more than worth the watch. Best Director nominations mirrors the Best Motion Picture, and include Ben Affleck (Argo), Stephen Spielberg (Lincoln), Ang Lee (Life of Pi), Kathryn Bigelow (Zero Dark Thirty) and Quentin Tarantino (Django Unchained), which is no surprise really. 

Continue reading: The Golden Globes Nominations, No Surprises For A Great Year Of Film

The Sessions: Does Paralyzed Virgin, Plus Sex Surrogate, Plus Helen Hunt, Equal Oscar?


Helen Hunt John Hawkes Ben Lewin

The Sessions, an indie-drama about a paralyzed poet who hires a sex surrogate to lose his virginity, is creating quite a buzz as awards' season approaches. The movie, directed by Ben Lewin and starring Helen Hunt and John Hawkes, hits theaters in the U.S. this weekend and has received rave reviews.

The movie holds a quite stunning 97% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 53 reviews from some of the most revered critics in the business. Writing in the New York Times, Stephen Holden said, "The Sessions is a pleasant shock: a touching, profoundly sex-positive film that equates sex with intimacy, tenderness and emotional connection instead of performance, competition and conquest." Betsy Sharkey of the Los Angeles Times praised the movie for tackling its subject matter, writing, "In a country that embraces cinematic violence with such ease but blushingly prefers to keep sex in the shadows or under the sheets, the grown-up approach of "The Sessions" is rare." Bookmakers don't fancy the movie's chances to land Best Picture at the Oscar, though we see the current 14/1 odds as a real steal. As with 'The Artist' last year, word-of-mouth can really enhance a movie's chances heading into the Golden Globes and the Oscars, and the Academy has favoured indie movies in recent years. If you're of the opinion that 'Best Picture' is a bridge-too-far for 'The Sessions', you could do worse than backing Hawkes for Best Actor. He's currently the second favourite (behind Daniel Day Lewis) for the gong, and recently discussed his chances with Just Press Play.com , saying, ".who knows what will happen? The buzz, the talk, in a way makes me nervous to think about it, the Oscar evening, and the events leading up to it. But, it brings more people to the movie and that makes me really happy."

So, why not eschew the latest Paranormal Activity movie this weekend and go see The Sessions?


'The Sessions', Starring Helen Hunt And John Hawkes, Set For Oscar Success


Helen Hunt John Hawkes

Fringe director Ben Lewis' newest work, The Sessions has sparked a buzz among film crowds. Not only does it feature some of the top names in Hollywood - Helen Hunt and John Hawkes - but the premise is more than enough to spark moviegoers' interest. The film centers around the relationship between writer and polio survivor Mark O'Brien (John Hawkes) and his sex therapist, played by Helen Hunt. As the storyline unfolds, the relationship between therapist and patient develops into more than a strictly professional affair.

The film is based on a real-life story and deals with some heavy subjects like long-term illness, relationships and intimacy. Somewhat surprisingly, though, The Sessions is marketed as a comedy and Lewis himself says that he aimed to bring humour to something that could have turned into a very depressing story.

"There are always those early moments where the audience kind of gets the cue, "OK you have permission to laugh," Lewis has said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. His own experience with polio and paralysis is bound to bring some realism to the plot, as well as hopefully a few laughs in the right places. Whether or not he succeeded still remains to be seen, but the film has been generating early Oscar buzz. This seems like a very different process from Lewis' previous works, not least of all in terms of the marketing, which has been much heavier for The Sessions, than any of the director's other films. It looks like this may well be the flick which turns Lewis from a fringe filmmaker into a mainstream success.


Helen Hunt and John Hawkes - Helen Hunt and John Hawkes Wednesday 10th October 2012 Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Sessions', held at the Bing Theatre at LACMA

Helen Hunt and John Hawkes
William H. Macy, Helen Hunt and John Hawkes
William H. Macy, Helen Hunt and John Hawkes
William H. Macy, Tobias Forrest, Helen Hunt and John Hawkes
Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt

Frankenweenie Brings The BFI Film Festival 2012 To Life


Tim Burton Helena Bonham Carter Ben Affleck Helen Hunt John Hawkes Bill Murray

It's only right that a film about a dog named Sparky being brought back to life by his school-boy owner, firstly, be the creation of king of Halloween Tim Burton, and secondly that it be the first spark of hopefully many to set the BFI Film festival ablaze in filmic glory. Tim Burton's 'Frankenweenie' opened the festival in London today (Oct 10th 2012), not far from where the film was created in the east of the city.

The festival has been running for over fifty years and is a celebration of the world's most creative, inspiring and enjoyable films. Every year the festival is divided into categories, that differ year on year. For 2012 the assemblages are “Love, Laugh, Cult, Thrill and Debate.”

The festival will close with a new version of Charles Dickens' 'Great Expectations', adapted by Mike Newells. There will be a whole host of other premières including 'Hyde Park on Hudson' (a comedy about Franklin D. Roosevelt, starring Bill Murray), Ben Affleck's thriller 'Argo' and 'The Sessions' starring Helen Hunt and John Hawkes.

Continue reading: Frankenweenie Brings The BFI Film Festival 2012 To Life

Lincoln - Trailer Trailer


'Lincoln' will show the last four months of President Abraham Lincoln's life as he campaigned for freedom before he was tragically assassinated in 1865. It will reveal in detail the extent of his conflict with various members of the cabinet over his decision to abolish the slave trade towards the end of the American Civil War. His very close success in the House of Representatives over the proposition of the Thirteenth Amendment which outlawed slavery is portrayed as one of the most crucial steps in his work against the trade. The last months of his life also saw him fail to negotiate an end to the War and saw the Union's ultimate victory.

This drama-fuelled biopic is the important story of one of the most influential and inspiring presidents of the United States that have ever been in office. It has been based on some of the biography 'Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln' by Doris Kearns Goodwin with an adapted screenplay by Oscar nominee Tony Kushner ('Munich') and the directing genius of the legendary Steven Spielberg ('Jaws', 'E.T.', 'Jurassic Park', 'Schindler's List', 'War of the Worlds') who wanted to show Lincoln 'at work' and not just 'posing for the history books'. Spielberg has described the former president as 'arguably the greatest working President in American history'. The movie is set for release in the UK on January 25th 2013.

Starring: Daniel Day Lewis, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tommy Lee Jones , Michael Stuhlbarg, Jackie Earle Haley, Jared Harris, Lee Pace, Sally Field, James Spader, Julie White, John Hawkes, David Strathairn, Bruce McGill, Hal Holbrook and Adam Driver.

John Hawkes Wednesday 12th September 2012 'The Book of Mormon' Opening night held at the Pantages Theatre - Arrivals

John Hawkes
John Hawkes

John Hawkes Thursday 19th July 2012 The Los Angeles premiere of Ruby Sparks, held at The Lloyd E. Rigler Theatre

John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes

John Hawkes and Independent Spirit Awards Saturday 25th February 2012 27th Annual Independent Spirit Awards- Arrivals-

John Hawkes and Independent Spirit Awards
John Hawkes and Independent Spirit Awards
John Hawkes and Independent Spirit Awards

John Hawkes Monday 28th November 2011 Gotham Awards 2011 - Arrivals New York City, USA

John Hawkes

John Hawkes Friday 21st October 2011 55th BFI London Film Festival: Martha Marcy May Marlene - official screening held at the Vue West End - Arrivals. London, England

John Hawkes
John Hawkes

John Hawkes Tuesday 11th October 2011 The 49th Annual New York Film Festival premiere of Martha Marcy May Marlene - Red Carpet Arrivals. New York City, USA

John Hawkes
John Hawkes and Hugh Dancy
John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes

Video - Stars Of Martha Marcy May Marlene On The Red Carpet - Martha Marcy May Marlene Arrivals Part 1


The movie premiere of Martha Marcy May Marlene was held at the 49th Annual New York Film Festivals, with the cast and various celebrities in attendance. John Hawkes stood silently and posed for photographers, as did co-star Hugh Dancy. Brady Corbet and Elizabeth Olsen, who also star in the film, were also seen on the red carpet.

Martha Marcy May Marlene tells the story of a damaged woman who finds it difficult to adapt to a normal life after fleeing a dangerous cult

Contagion Trailer


When Beth Emhoff returns home after visiting an opening ceremony for a new factory, she complains of jet lag and her husband, Thomas Emhoff, thinks nothing of it. He becomes concerned when she falls ill, even more so when she has a seizure in front of him and has to be rushed to hospital. It comes as a shock to Thomas when she dies; her cause of death: a highly contagious and rapidly mutating bird flu virus that spreads via human contact. The virus is spreading so fast there is no vaccine or cure for it.

Continue: Contagion Trailer

John Hawkes and Vanity Fair - John Hawkes and guest Los Angeles, California - 2011 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at the Sunset Tower Hotel in Hollywood Sunday 27th February 2011

John Hawkes and Vanity Fair
John Hawkes and Vanity Fair

John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards Saturday 26th February 2011 The 2011

John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards

John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards - John Hawkes and Dale Dickey Los Angeles, California - The 2011 Film Independent Spirit awards held at Santa Monica Beach - Press Room Saturday 26th February 2011

John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards
John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards

John Hawkes, Independent Spirit Awards and Spirit Awards Sunday 27th February 2011

John Hawkes - Monday 7th February 2011 at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Beverly Hills, California

John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes

John Hawkes - Friday 4th February 2011 at Santa Barbara International Film Festival Santa Barbara, California

John Hawkes

John Hawkes, Hailee Steinfeld, Jacki Weaver and Lesley Manville - John Hawkes, Lesley Manville, Hailee Steinfeld and Jacki Weaver Sanata Barbara, California - Attend The Vituosos Awards held at the Lobero Theatre Friday 4th February 2011

John Hawkes, Hailee Steinfeld, Jacki Weaver and Lesley Manville

John Hawkes - Sunday 30th January 2011 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

John Hawkes
John Hawkes
John Hawkes

The Amateurs Review


Very Good
Andy (Jeff Bridges) is, as they say, an idea man. He mopes and mopes until a brainstorm hits him and launches him out of the bar: Say, getting everyone in his small town to sell vitamins in a pyramid scheme, only to find that, if everyone's selling, no one's buying.

An idea man, you see.

Continue reading: The Amateurs Review

Wristcutters: A Love Story Review


Good
Woody Allen has said, "Don't look upon death as an end but as a very effective way of cutting down on your expenses." But it doesn't quite work out that way in Goran Dukic's feature film debut as writer/director, Wristcutters: A Lover Story.

Wristcutters: A Love Story takes place in a barren landscape littered with the detritus of consumer culture, where the unsmiling populace eat grayish junk food, hang around dingy bars and dilapidated apartments, and listen to audio cassettes of Joy Division and Gram Parsons. Welcome to Purgatory, a drab and monotonous dead zone, appearing like a cross between the Mojave Desert and Trenton, New Jersey. This is the depository of all the unhappy folk who have offed themselves in life and are now in limbo, not quite dead but certainly no longer among the living. Dukic tells the tale in a literally deadpan style road movie, resembling a George Romeo version of The Wizard of Oz, filtered through a sardonic sensibility; a quieter, gentler version of the Dylan song "Ain't Talkin'" or Cormac McCarthy's The Road.

Continue reading: Wristcutters: A Love Story Review

Hardball Review


Bad
Brian Robbins' Hardball is quite the cinematic achievement. In about two hours, we get a glancing examination of ghetto life, a funeral with a heartfelt eulogy, speeches about never giving up, a cache of cute kids (including a fat one with asthma), a hard-luck gambler who finds salvation in a good woman and a climactic "big game," where the underdogs prove to have a bigger bite than anyone ever imagined.

All that's needed is a guy getting hit in the nuts and a food fight to have the first film solely based on cinematic clichés. I can't wait to see the deleted scenes when it comes out on DVD.

Continue reading: Hardball Review

Identity Review


Weak
If, like me, you've been seeing trailers for Identity all year -- with its rain-soaked cast, rickety motel, slowly dying characters, and disappearing bodies -- then, like me, you have absolutely no clue what this movie is supposed to be about.

After spending 90 minutes in a screening during which the highlight was a print that caught on fire and melted halfway through the performance, I'm not terribly closer to knowing myself.

Continue reading: Identity Review

Me And You And Everyone We Know Review


Extraordinary
Don't let Miranda July's background as a performance artist scare you away from her first feature, the offbeat, totally winning Me and You and Everyone We Know. July, who also stars in the film, combines a twisted indie sensibility with honesty and warmth, creating a movie of surprising accessibility. As the "independent" genre becomes increasingly forced, Miranda July's greatest accomplishment is that this all feels so effortless.

Making up the odd little microcosm of Me and You (recently chosen for competition at Cannes) are characters ranging in size, color, age and desires. Christine (July), a woman who chauffeurs the elderly around in her car, longs for two things: her own art installation and the affections of a scruffy shoe salesman named Richard (John Hawkes, of HBO's Deadwood). Richard is nursing a broken heart and a bit of self-flagellation since separating with his wife and moving his mixed race sons (Miles Thompson and amazing six-year-old Brandon Ratcliff) into a tiny apartment.

Continue reading: Me And You And Everyone We Know Review

A Slipping-Down Life Review


Good
In the kind of town people tend to think of leaving, a timid young woman leading a monotonous life suddenly flips into a mode of uncharacteristic spontaneity when she discovers a local honky-tonk singer with an attitude that rings her bell.

Evie Decker (Lili Taylor) lives with her sedentary and semi-senile father (Tom Bower) in a modest house on an uneventful street (shot around Austin, Texas) and works in a demeaning job at a rundown amusement park. Her moment of magic comes when, on a radio interview, the voice of struggling musician Drumstrings Casey (the cheeky faced Guy Pearce) says things that the interviewer has no possibility of relating to but with which Evie is in perfect harmony. He has plucked the right chord on her heartstrings and she wastes no time getting down to see him perform at the roadhouse with her closest friend, Violet (Sara Rue).

Continue reading: A Slipping-Down Life Review

Playing God Review


Weak
Extremely uneven movie about a defrocked L.A. surgeon/drug addict (Duchovny) who falls in with a two-bit mobster (Hutton) and his gorgeous moll (Jolie). A curious premise and a strong antihero are wasted, though, because Playing God has virtually no plot to speak of, which, you know, can be a hindrance to a movie from time to time.

Me & You & Everyone We Know Review


Good
It probably helps a great deal that the wispy, flower-likeMiranda July appears in her own film, as her adorable, blue-eyed presencewarms what would have been a cold, quirky, Todd Solondz-like experiencein "Me and You and Everyone We Know."

Like a mini-"Short Cuts," the story follows severallost and lonely characters as they cross paths in funny, sad and sometimesdisturbing ways. A six year-old boy chats on an internet sex site, a manlights his hand on fire and a woman practically throws herself at him,not comprehending how dangerous or unhinged he may be. Yet none of thissets off any alarm bells, thanks to July's wide-eyed dreaminess and eternalhope.

A former performance artist and video maker, her featuredebut plays both with memorable visuals and lovingly written words. Fromthe opening sequence -- in which she records two voices for a potentialvideo art piece -- she raises our hopes and manages to keep them there.

July plays Christine, a video artist who falls for Richard(John Hawkes), a newly divorced father of two boys, one a teenager andthe other only six. Christine also drives an Elder Cab and becomes involvedwith some of her aged clients. Otherwise, we meet a couple of teenage girlsexperimenting with sex, Richard's African-American ex-wife, who alreadyhas a new boyfriend, and a lonely art museum curator.

Continue reading: Me & You & Everyone We Know Review

Hardball Review


Good

Surprisingly, the redemption-by-baseball picture "Hardball" is not some warm-fuzzy "Bad News Bears" clone transplanted to the projects. It's considerably better than that.

Yes, it is about a drunk, gambling-addicted ticket scalper who spitefully agrees to coach a ghetto little league team for $500 a week to pay off a two angry bookies. Yes, the scalper is played by the historically vacuous Keanu Reeves, and yes, he's going to learn What's Really Important In Life from endearingly foul-mouthed street kids who live cautionary-tale type lives of inner city strife.

But as fast as "Hardball" sets up such eye-rolling clichés, director Brian Robbins knocks them down. There are no inspirational montages of the squad pulling together and honing their skills. The well-financed rival team? Present and accounted for, but not a major subplot. Ditto for the schoolteacher romantic interest (Diane Lane) and the headstrong tenement mom whose respect Reeves must earn.

Continue reading: Hardball Review

Identity Review


Weak

"Identity" is supposed to be a psychological thriller with a shocking twist, so I'll try to not give much away in this review. But I don't know why I should bother since the film is carpeted wall-to-wall with such blatant clues that even before the opening title sequence draws to a close, it's put all its cards on the table.

In that sequence, a legal-defense shrink pours over a montage of newspaper clippings and police files about a schizophrenic serial killer who may have witnessed his parents' murder as a child. The killer is scheduled for execution the next day, and the doc (Alfred Molina) is working on an 11th-hour appeal.

Director James Mangold ("Kate & Leopold, " "Girl Interrupted") cuts back to this story from time to time as a midnight sanity hearing is held for the heavily drugged convict. But for reasons I won't divulge here, 95 percent of the picture takes place at a remote Nevada strip motel where 10 strangers (including a washed-up actress, bickering newlyweds and a family that had been in a bad car accident) have been stranded by a flash-flood rainstorm -- and one by one they're turning up gruesomely slain.

Continue reading: Identity Review

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John Hawkes Movies

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri Trailer

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri Trailer

Somebody messed with the wrong mother when they murdered her daughter Angela Hayes (Kathryn Newton)....

Everest Movie Review

Everest Movie Review

With visually stunning imagery and a solid A-list cast, this film just about transcends its...

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Everest Trailer

Everest Trailer

When two different climbing parties set out on the expedition of their lives, they knew...

Everest - Teaser Trailer

Everest - Teaser Trailer

Some people get a once in a lifetime chance to make history. Some people, unfortunately...

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Life of Crime Movie Review

Life of Crime Movie Review

Although the plot itself is nothing special, this kidnapping comedy keeps the audience entertained by...

Life Of Crime Trailer

Life Of Crime Trailer

Frank Dawson is a filthy rich, arrogant real estate developer who regularly takes 'business trips'...

Lincoln Movie Review

Lincoln Movie Review

A historic epic from Steven Spielberg carries a lot of baggage, but he surprises us...

The Sessions Movie Review

The Sessions Movie Review

By taking a sensitive, honest approach to this true story, breakthrough filmmaker Lewin both avoids...

The Sessions - Trailer Trailer

The Sessions - Trailer Trailer

Mark O'Brien suffers from a particularly virile form of polio; a debilitating disease that has...

Lincoln - Trailer Trailer

Lincoln - Trailer Trailer

'Lincoln' will show the last four months of President Abraham Lincoln's life as he campaigned...

Martha Marcy May Marlene Movie Review

Martha Marcy May Marlene Movie Review

With a disturbing tone and skilful filmmaking, this insinuating drama completely unsettles us as it...

Contagion Movie Review

Contagion Movie Review

Soderbergh applies his brainier brand of filmmaking to the global outbreak thriller genre, and the...

Contagion Trailer

Contagion Trailer

When Beth Emhoff returns home after visiting an opening ceremony for a new factory, she...

Winter's Bone Movie Review

Winter's Bone Movie Review

Based on the Daniel Woodrell novel, this film is a riveting exploration of old-society notions...

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