John C Mcginley

John C Mcginley

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Scenic Route Los Angeles Premiere

John C. McGinley and Nichole McGinley - Celebrities attend Scenic Route Los Angeles Premiere at Chinese Theater 6 - Hollywood. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 21st August 2013

John C. McGinley and Nichole McGinley
John C. McGinley and Nichole McGinley
John C. McGinley and Nichole McGinley
John C. McGinley and Nichole McGinley

TNT's 25th Anniversary Party

John C. McGinley - TNT's 25th Anniversary Party held at the Aqua Star Pool at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 24th July 2013

John C. McGinley
John C. McGinley

Actor Chadwick Boseman who played Jackie Robinson in the movie "42" throws out the first pitch at the Dodgers game.

Chadwick Boseman and John C. McGinley - Actor Chadwick Boseman who played Jackie Robinson in the movie "42" throws out the first pitch at the Dodgers game. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Saturday 13th July 2013

Chadwick Boseman
Chadwick Boseman
Chadwick Boseman
Chadwick Boseman
Chadwick Boseman

'42 The True Story of an American Legend' Los Angeles premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre

John C. McGinley - '42 The True Story of an American Legend' Los Angeles premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Tuesday 9th April 2013

John C. McGinley

Los Angeles premiere of '42' held at the Chinese Theatre

John C. McGinley - Los Angeles premiere of '42' held at the Chinese Theatre - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United Sates - Tuesday 9th April 2013

Are We Done Yet? Review


Grim
In normal movie world, Are We Done Yet? would have been the first movie in this series. First, newlyweds Nick (Ice Cube) and Suzanne (Nia Long) would redo their new home, then Nick would take the bratty kids on a road trip.

Often vilified as one of the worst films ever made, Are We Done Yet? is far better than its pedigree would suggest. Mining the home improvement milieu has been done before, and if you've seen The Money Pit you know exactly what's going to happen here. Nick and co. will move into what looks like a dream house, but it will fall apart before their very eyes. A group of incompetant repairmen and contractors will attempt to save it. Nick will have a lot of drywall fall on his head. And the stress will cause much marital strife. The "original" spin here vs. The Money Pit: Suzanne is pregnant.

Continue reading: Are We Done Yet? Review

Platoon Review


Extraordinary
Like no other movie could tell, Platoon shows us categorically that war -- and especially the Vietnam War -- is hell.

The story is vintage Oliver Stone -- based on his own experiences in the bush with only a few moments of fictionalization. In Platoon, Charlie Sheen plays a young and naive Private Chris Taylor, a newbie in Nam who is thrown waist-deep into the jungle only hours after arrival. Within a week he's regretting having volunteered, already a shell of the man he was in the States.

Continue reading: Platoon Review

Point Break Review


Excellent
It's hard to decide whether Point Break is a really bad good movie or a really good bad movie. On one hand, it boasts thrilling, original action sequences, a tightly woven caper plot, and a cast jam-packed with Hollywood middleweights acting -- and surfing -- their asses off. On the other hand, it also suffers from terrifying leaps of story logic, a vacuous emotional core, and some of the silliest dialogue ever spoken onscreen. It's a Hollywood formula movie at its best and worst. At the center of this conundrum is the greatest acting enigma of the age -- Keanu Reeves. Never has a man acted so poorly, spoken lines so blandly, for the cinematic enjoyment of so many. He churns out unintentionally comic performances in blockbuster after blockbuster, each time raising the question of how exactly he landed the role, and how much worse the movie would be without him. I suppose the answers to these riddles don't matter much, because, no matter how you come down on these weighty issues, when the dust settles, two indisputable points clearly emerge: Point Break is great fun to watch and Reeves was born to play the part of FBI agent Johnny Utah.

The story is your basic high-concept Hollywood action premise. Utah is a young, eager FBI agent assigned to the Los Angeles bank robbery task force. His crusty veteran partner, Angelo Pappas (Gary Busey), has been trying for years to bring down a highly professional crew of bank robbers called the Ex-Presidents (known as such because they disguise themselves with novelty masks of former presidents during their robberies). Despite the ridicule of his colleagues, Pappas has long held the belief that the Ex-Presidents are surfers who use the robbery money to fund their presumably lavish lifestyle. So, with nothing else to go on, Pappas and Utah come up with the plan that Utah will go undercover as a surfer in order to infiltrate the beach-loving subculture and bring down the Ex-Presidents.

Continue reading: Point Break Review

Stealing Harvard Review


Terrible
Toward the end of Stealing Harvard, Tom Green's character goes to great lengths trying to break a Plexiglas window from inside the store he is trying to rob. It took the entire movie, but I could finally identify with his character. It wasn't because I have a tendency for thievery, instead I found it my only chance to escape the entrapment of this dismal movie - naturally he can't get the window to bust.

Stealing Harvard centers on the sensible, hardworking John (Jason Lee) who made a promise long ago that he would pay for his niece Noreen's (Tammy Blanchard) college education. At the time, John thought Noreen would never amount to much, considering she is the daughter of his trailer trash sister Patty (Megan Mullally, in the film's best, but neglected, role). Much to John's chagrin, Noreen gets accepted to Harvard and now he must make good on his word to pay for her first year of schooling. John already has the cash he needs, but he has promised this money to his fiancée Elaine (Leslie Mann) for use as a down payment on their dream home. Sounds like John is making too many promises.

Continue reading: Stealing Harvard Review

Platoon Review


Extraordinary
Like no other movie could tell, Platoon shows us categorically that war -- and especially the Vietnam War -- is hell.

The story is vintage Oliver Stone -- based on his own experiences in the bush with only a few moments of fictionalization. In Platoon, Charlie Sheen plays a young and naive Private Chris Taylor, a newbie in Nam who is thrown waist-deep into the jungle only hours after arrival. Within a week he's regretting having volunteered, already a shell of the man he was in the States.

Continue reading: Platoon Review

Flypaper Review


Terrible
Would that I could tell you, gentle reader, what this movie is actually about. A meaningless hodgepodge of stories about snakes, bondage, kidnapping, and God knows what else. It's too bad, because there are actually some decent actors here. Lord knows why they took the parts. A pathetic excuse for a film, redeemed only in a miniscule way by Jeffrey Jones' cameo at the very end of the picture.

Intensity Review


Grim
John McGinley takes an odd role as an extremely odd psycho. He's kidnapped a little girl and is keeping her in his basement. And then for some reason he massacres a nearby family, in order to take pictures of the dead guys and bring them back to the little girl. Along for the ride is poor Chyna (Molly Parker), who had a rough childhood full of violence, and here she is trying to stop the madman who killed her college friend. See, she's got problems, he's got problems? If she survives the torment of the killer, will she survive her own inner torment? Yes, it's all nonsense, stretched out to the 3 hours of mini-series length and courtesy of mass-market horror writer Dean Koontz. Whatever!

Get Carter (2000) Review


Grim
Forget Get Carter. Instead... get me a cup of coffee.

What the hell has happened to all good American action movies? Did I unknowingly miss a meeting somewhere? When did all of the bad-ass, kicking butt and taking names, gun-toting, crazed, vengeful characters of the 1980s -- from such films as Commando, Cobra, Predator, Raw Deal, First Blood -- suddenly turn into innocent, compassionate, sensitive, teary-eyed knuckleheads. The only place to turn these days for an honest action film is towards the East -- and I don't mean New York City.

Continue reading: Get Carter (2000) Review

Surviving the Game Review


Grim
To survive the game you first have to survive the movie, an update of The Most Dangerous Game only with a homeless guy being hunted for sport instead of a blue-blood. Too bad for the hunting party (helmed by Rutger Hauer in a golf cap), they picked the wrong guy to hunt: Ice-T in dreadlocks. The acting is atrocious: Watch for F. Murray Abraham's pained shriek when his son falls off a cliff. Oops, that's a spoiler.

The Animal Review


Good
It's always a shame when good comedic talent goes bad, and a pleasant surprise when that finally lands a decent role in a funny film. Nothing has been expected of Rob Schneider since his departure from the hellhole of mind-numbing roles like the Copy Guy Richmeister and the Weed Guy on Saturday Night Live, as well as bit parts in ridiculous Muppet Movie sequels and Adam Sandler comedies. But Rob Schneider is a funny man. I remember watching him at the Improv in San Diego when I was 12 years old and laughing my ass off at his brilliant portrayal of Elvis on a fishhook. I was 12, but what the hey?

Modern comedy comes from its ability to not take its story or its characters seriously. The Farrelly brothers and Woody Allen have taught us that. Recent failures like Joe Dirt and Schneider's last film Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo owe themselves to a seriousness they try to create by treating their main characters as martyrs for the audience to sympathize with and pity. The Animal does no such thing, avoiding this common mistake totally and developing into an enjoyable and hilarious 90 minutes.

Continue reading: The Animal Review

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