John Boorman

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Queen And Country Trailer


Basic training for the Korean War is tough on a group of young British cadets. It's specifically tough on Bill Rohan (Callum Turner), as their sergeant hates him. The only consoling factor is the trainee nurses school just outside of his basecamp. When he's not trying to woo the nurses in the town, he's sneaking over to their school to see the woman he has fallen in love with. But when the sergeant's prize clock is stolen, Rohan must do everything to save his best friend from court marshalling, catch the girl of his dreams, and prepare for war.

Continue: Queen And Country Trailer

Director John Boorman - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Clouds Of Sils Maria - Premiere - Cannes, France - Friday 23rd May 2014

John Boorman
John Boorman

John Boorman - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

John Boorman Monday 18th June 2012 Guests honour Aung San Suu Kyi at The Grand Canal Theatre at the 'Electric Burma' concert

John Boorman

Exorcist II: The Heretic Review


Terrible
Er, what's that? You didn't understand the intricacies of Exorcist II: The Heretic? What an idiot you are! You've got Linda Blair as a teenager, under hypnosis for most of the movie. You've got James Earl Jones as an African tribal leader. You've got "the good locusts." And you've got Richard Burton as a priest who opens up the whole can of demons afresh! Total, utter nonsense with a bad dub job. Stick with the original, or the next sequel if you must.

The Tailor Of Panama Review


Good
Somebody told Pierce Brosnan to change his image.

In The Tailor of Panama -- based on John Le Carré's novel and directed by John Boorman (Beyond Rangoon, Zardoz) -- Brosnan trades in the sophistication of James Bond for the identity of crude, disgraced spy Andy Osnard, an MI-6 operative that has to be shipped off to Panama on account of his loathsome behavior. Once he arrives in Panama City, the bad behavior doesn't stop: Osnard immediately sets upon the task of uncovering "what's going on" with the Panama Canal. Rumors swirl that it will be sold to another country now that Panama has it back from the U.S. Or perhaps there will be a coup from a populist underground?

Continue reading: The Tailor Of Panama Review

Beyond Rangoon Review


OK
Beyond Rangoon is absolutely typical of the way Hollywood can take a compelling story, full of genuine characters and heartfelt emotion, then hack it to tiny bits and put it back together, Frankenstein-like, into a sappy, overwrought drama that is without a soul and without a point.

The story is "based on actual events." Patricia Arquette plays Laura, an American doctor trying to find peace after the brutal murder of her husband and son. With her sister (Frances McDormand), they embark on a tour of the exotic East, including a peaceful stopover in Burma, a war-torn country ruled by military dictatorship (As they say, "In Burma, everything is illegal."). Laura's passport is lifted, and she finds herself trapped in the capital city of Rangoon, while her sister and their tour group head off to Bangkok. The Burmese pick that time to revolt, and Laura finds herself caught up in a civil war, which basically amounts to dodging bullets in the jungle while covered in mud.

Continue reading: Beyond Rangoon Review

Deliverance Review


Essential
It's got the most memorable opening on movie history -- "Duelling Banjos" speaks for itself after 30 years -- and one of the cinema's most horrifying rape scenes as well (most recently aped in Pulp Fiction). This tale of "city boys" taking a weekend trip by canoe down a soon-to-be-dammed river is about primitivism of both the all-talk and the real kind, and how desperate circumstances can make real men out of the weakest of wills. A landmark in movie history.

Exorcist II: The Heretic Review


Terrible
Er, what's that? You didn't understand the intricacies of Exorcist II: The Heretic? What an idiot you are! You've got Linda Blair as a teenager, under hypnosis for most of the movie. You've got James Earl Jones as an African tribal leader. You've got "the good locusts." And you've got Richard Burton as a priest who opens up the whole can of demons afresh! Total, utter nonsense with a bad dub job. Stick with the original, or the next sequel if you must.

Zardoz Review


Weak
"The gun is good. The penis is evil!" Such is one of many howlers in Zardoz, John Boorman's paean to, well, to I don't know what, but this cross between a low-budget sci-fi movie and a porno flick ranks more with the penis than the gun. The plot involves Sean Connery as a savage in a 2200's dystopia (where they worship a giant rock called Zardoz), who makes his way into a society of nearly-naked immortals, where he wreaks havoc thanks to a computer made out of a large diamond. We'd be shocked by the stupidity if we weren't laughing so hard thanks to Connery's hot pants. If nothing else, Zardoz proves that anyone's career can survive a bad flick or two.

The General Review


Good
It was a critical darling but I can't figure out why. Based on a true story, Gleeson plays the lovable oaf of an Irish folk hero and two-bit gangster Martin Cahill. The bulk of the film involves a couple of "daring" robberies Cahill and his working-class gang pulled off and the heat the police, the IRA, and the UVF bring down on him. Cahill as a character is a bizzare one, notably due to the two women he keeps and an eccentric personality, to say the least. But the film is flat, partially owing to its well over 2-hour running time but mainly due to the ultra-thick Irish accents, poor sound quality, and the fact the Gleeson spends most of the movie with his hand covering his face. Large chunks of The General are completely incomprehensible. And I'm not about to watch it again.

In My Country Review


Bad
South Africa's 1995 Truth and Reconciliation Hearings - which sought to resolve the animosity between blacks and white Afrikaners after the fall of apartheid by having victimized blacks confront their white tormentors, who in turn would be granted amnesty by publicly admitting to, apologizing for, and proving that they were ordered to carry out, their hateful actions - may one day spawn a great movie. In My Country, John Boorman's lazy and ludicrous film about the Hearings, isn't it. A prime example of why it's dangerous to concoct fictional narratives in order to tell historically important stories, Boorman's latest is awkward and ungainly, a dramatically forced and stilted tale of interracial reconciliation bereft of any rhythm and even less subtlety. With the wildly inconsistent director working more in the vein of his legendary disaster Exorcist II: The Heretic than his neo-noir masterpiece Point Blank, it's the kind of well-intentioned, but wholly unsuccessful, misfire that makes one desperately pine for a thorough documentary on its real-life subject.

Inauspiciously beginning with a clunky montage of sun-dappled vistas and police brutality newsreel footage set to rousing (but still slightly heartbreaking) African singing, In My Country focuses on Anna Malan (Juliette Binoche), an Afrikaner journalist and poet whose white father and brother disapprove of her interest in the Hearings ("Remember where you're from, Anna," racist Dad ominously warns). While covering the event, she meets Langston Whitfield (Samuel L. Jackson), a Washington Post reporter opposed to the Hearings' disinterest in persecuting the country's heinous, government-sponsored white criminals. The two quarrel over the effectiveness and justness of the Hearings' guiding principle of "Ubuntu" (an African belief in forgiveness over punishment), but their horror and sadness over the proceedings' testimonials - many of which have been recreated, word-for-gut-wrenching word, by the filmmakers - helps them eventually bridge their initial ideological differences and, in the case of Anna, learn to reconcile herself to her family's own nasty role in apartheid. After some boneheaded flirting, the two attempt to heal the country's racial divisions themselves through lovemaking, all while Anna's cheery African-American sidekick Dumi (Menzi Ngubane) gleefully confirms the hoariest of stereotypes by breaking into jubilant song and dance at every available turn (including in court).

Continue reading: In My Country Review

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John Boorman Movies

Queen And Country Trailer

Queen And Country Trailer

Basic training for the Korean War is tough on a group of young British cadets....

The Tailor of Panama Movie Review

The Tailor of Panama Movie Review

Somebody told Pierce Brosnan to change his image.In The Tailor of Panama -- based on...

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In My Country Movie Review

In My Country Movie Review

South Africa's 1995 Truth and Reconciliation Hearings - which sought to resolve the animosity between...

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