John Benjamin Hickey

John Benjamin Hickey

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2015 Roundabout Theatre Company Spring Gala - Arrivals

John Benjamin Hickey - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived at the 2015 Roundabout Theatre Company Spring Gala which was held at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 2nd March 2015

WGN's 'Manhattan' - Photocall

Manhattan Cast, Ashley Zukerman, Daniel Stern, Olivia Williams, John Benjamin Hickey, Rachel Brosnahan, Thomas Schlamme and Sam Shaw - WGN's 'Manhattan' - Photocall - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 9th July 2014

Daniel Stern
Manhattan Cast, Ashley Zukerman, Daniel Stern, Olivia Williams, John Benjamin Hickey, Rachel Brosnahan, Thomas Schlamme and Sam Shaw
Daniel Stern
Daniel Stern

The Paley Center For Media Presents An Evening With WGN America's \Manhattan\

John Benjamin Hickey, Olivia Williams, Rachel Brosnahan, Ashley Zuckerman, Thomas Schlamme, Sam Shaw, Bill Richardson and Daniel Stern - The Paley Center For Media Presents An Evening With WGN America's Manhattan - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 9th July 2014

John Benjamin Hickey
John Benjamin Hickey
John Benjamin Hickey

Good Shepherd Services Spring Party

John Benjamin Hickey - Good Shepherd Services Spring Party hosted by Isaac Mizrahi - New York City, New York , United States - Thursday 25th April 2013

John Benjamin Hickey
John Benjamin Hickey, Isaac Mizrahi and Marcus Samuelsson
John Benjamin Hickey, Laura Linney and Isaac Mizrahi

Picture - John Benjamin Hickey , Thursday 21st June 2012

John Benjamin Hickey Thursday 21st June 2012 Opening night of The Public Theater production of 'As You Like It' at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park - Arrivals

John Benjamin Hickey

The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 Review


OK
Adapting a steely 1970s hit into a glossy 21st century blockbuster, Tony Scott indulges in his usual flashy pyrotechnics, which almost cover up the gaping craters in the plot. He also encourages his cast to really go for it.

Walter (Washington) is working at the dispatch desk for the New York Subway when crazed gunman Ryder (Travolta) hijacks the Pelham 123 and demands a huge ransom, or else he'll start killing passengers. Ryder refuses to talk to the know-it-all terrorism expert (Turturro), so Walter is pressed into service as a negotiator while the mayor (Gandolfini) gets the cash together. But Ryder and his goons are serious about this and, as the body count grows, the clock is ticking.

Director Scott and writer Helgeland aren't known for their subtlety, and this film is all whizzy style that's more about pure entertainment rather than establishing any actual suspense or character tension. The whole film is a collection of crashing edits, freeze frames, countdown graphics, loud sound effects and cheesily hysterical dialog. In other words, it's great fun. And it gives the cast plenty of scenery to chomp on--especially Travolta, who shows no mercy as he snarls and spits out every line.

Since this is a film about a Subway carriage sitting still in a tunnel, Scott keeps the camera moving at all times. He also manages to throw in a crazed car chase and loads of big crashes for no real reason, as well as orchestrating a painfully contrived reason to get Washington in on the gun-waving action. Not to throwing in several rather overwrought back-stories. By the end, the film has turned into a full-on Die Hard movie, complete with over-the-top violence and some real brutality.

Amid the fabulously enjoyable actors, it's Gandolfini who walks off with the movie using sardonic understatement. The whole film is pretty hilarious, although this clearly wasn't the intention. Scott zooms past plot holes like a runaway train; we barely have time to say "Huh?" before the next bit of action mayhem assaults all our senses. There's not a moment of actual suspense, but it's so big and outrageous that we can't help but hold on for the ride.

Continue reading: The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 Review

Then She Found Me Review


Weak
"Don't be glib with me!" declares a character in Helen Hunt's ticking-biological-clock panic comedy Then She Found Me, and it's too bad Hunt didn't take her character's advice in the shaping of the film. For most of its running time, Then She Found Me stays safely within television sitcom glibness, the edges softened and motivations rigged into idiot-box coincidence and artificiality. It's Mad About You with home pregnancy test swabs.

Hunt is April Epner, a 39-year-old schoolteacher, married to Ben (Matthew Broderick), the puffy, neighborhood schlub. April is childless and longs for "a baby that is really hers." Being an adopted daughter in a close-knit Jewish family (she envies Ben Shenkman's Freddy, the biological family brother), she wants the biological connection of a birth child. As the film begins, her mother Trudy (Lynn Cohen) is in the hospital, her father has died, and April's comfortable world is about to explode. Things go awry from the get-go when April, obsessed with getting pregnant, greets Ben at home with a nightie under her coat, eager for a surprise tumble. But Ben tops her by announcing his decision to leave their months old marriage. Things continue falling apart -- April juggling the death of Trudy, having an affair with the embittered, divorced Frank (Colin Firth), and -- to top it all off -- the sudden appearance of April's biological mother, Bernice Graves, a brassy, unpretentious loudmouth and local talk-show hostess, played by Bette Midler (who else?).

Continue reading: Then She Found Me Review

Finding North Review


Terrible
You know those movies that make you laugh more out of pity than amusement? Finding North will be lucky if it elicits that much emotion from audiences. Even if you have a "Wait-For-It-To-Come-Out-On-Video" List, don't bother saving a space for Director Tanya Wexler's debut.

In the opening scene, Wendy Makkena (Sister Act, Air Bud) stars as Rhonda Portelli, a young woman who becomes infatuated with a naked man she sees about to jump off the Brooklyn Bridge. Unfortunately, Travis Furlong, played by John Benjamin Hickey (The General's Daugher, Love! Valour! Compassion!), doesn't take this plunge and save us from the next hour and a half.

Continue reading: Finding North Review

Love! Valour! Compassion! Review


Grim
Jason Alexander's acclaimed performance in this play adaptation is about the only thing going for it. The story of eight gay men (one of whom is dying with AIDS) adds little to the Big Chill genre of filmmaking, despite its all-male cast. The adaptation is droll -- pulling the three acts literally verbatim from the play itself -- and the story is essentially forgettable aside from a few memorable moments. Very few.
John Benjamin Hickey

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