John Banville

John Banville

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John Banville in conversation with Edel Coffey to discuss his book 'The Black Eyed Blonde'

Edel Coffey and John Banville - Author John Banville in conversation with Edel Coffey to discuss his book 'The Black Eyed Blonde' at Hodges Figgis - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 11th April 2014

John Banville
Edel Coffey and John Banville
John Banville

The Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013

Michael Harding, Fintian O'Toole, Roddy Doyle and John Banville - The Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013 held at the Doubletree Hilton Hotel. During the event, Sinead O'Connor had a run-in with photographers where she exchanged words, after she tried to avoid being photographed. - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 26th November 2013

Irish Book Awards 2013

John Banville - Guests arrive at the Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013 at the Doubletree Hilton Hotel... - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 26th November 2013

Albert Nobbs Review


OK
Based on a true story, this introspective film seems to suggest that these events aren't perhaps as extraordinary as they appear. But the strong premise is weakened by writing and direction that never get a grip on the story.

In 1898, Albert (Close) works at an upscale Dublin hotel, and no one suspects that he's actually a woman. Quietly going about his work while saving to open a tobacco shop, Albert is unassuming and relentlessly polite. Then he's asked to share his room with visiting painter Hubert (McTeer), who learns his secret and reveals one of his own: he's a woman too. But Hubert has managed to have a normal married life. This inspires Albert to pursue the hotel maid Helen (Wasikowska), which is complicated by her lusty relationship with handyman Joe (Johnson).

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Picture - Brenda Fricker, John Banville and... , Saturday 18th February 2012

Brenda Fricker, Glenn Close, John Banville and Dublin International Film Festival - Brenda Fricker, John Banville and Glenn Close Saturday 18th February 2012 The Irish Premiere of Albert Nobbs at the Savoy cinema as part of the Jameson Dublin international film festival

Brenda Fricker, Glenn Close, John Banville and Dublin International Film Festival

The Last September Review


Grim
I really wanted to like The Last September. Sunday afternoon, really in the mood for a period piece, I sat down with the promising flick... and got a tired old romantic triangle flick set in 1920s Ireland that plodded along with little regard for the audience. The setting here is elusive: The title refers obliquely to Ireland's last September before its revolution, but the backdrop of war barely registers above the genteel performances and sleepy script.
John Banville

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