Joel Silver

Joel Silver

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Memorial Day Party hosted by Joel Silver

Dianne Kruger - Celebrities at Memorial Day Party hosted by Joel Silver at Malibu - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 25th May 2015

Joel Silver and Ruby Maguire
Joel Silver and Ruby Maguire
Memorial Day Party and Joel Silver
Memorial Day Party and Joel Silver
Joel Silver and Dianne Kuger

Joel Silver Memorial Day Party

Barbra Stoyanoff - Cisco Adler and Barbra Stoyanoff seen at Joel Silvers Memorial Day party in Malibu. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th May 2014

Joel Silver Memorial Day Party

Ryan Sweeting - Kaley Cuoco and Ryan Sweeting seen at Joel Silvers Memorial Day party in Malibu. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th May 2014

Joel Silver and Ryan Sweeting
Joel Silver and Ryan Sweeting
Joel Silver and Ryan Sweeting
Joel Silver and Ryan Sweeting
Joel Silver and Ryan Sweeting

Joel Silver Memorial Day Party

Kingston Rossdale - Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale seen arriving and leaving Joel Silvers Memorial Day party in Malibu. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th May 2014

Joel Silver and Kingston Rossdale
Joel Silver and Kingston Rossdale
Joel Silver and Kingston Rossdale
Joel Silver and Kingston Rossdale
Joel Silver and Kingston Rossdale

Non-stop Review


Good

With a premise not much more believable than Snakes on a Plane, this slickly made thriller entertains us from start to finish by never flinching once. It may be utterly ridiculous, but it's played with full-on dedication by a gifted cast and a filmmaker who knows how to ramp up tension out of thin air, so to speak. Yes, it's utterly idiotic, but it's so much fun that we want a sequel even before this film crashes to the ground.

Relapsed alcoholic Air Marshal Bill (Neeson) has far too much personal baggage as he heads to work on a trans-Atlantic flight. Still grieving over his daughter's death as he drinks a bit of coffee with his whiskey, his hopes of a quiet flight are soon dashed when he receives an in-flight text threatening to kill a passenger every 20 minutes if he doesn't pay a huge ransom. So he kicks into action-man gear. But things start getting seriously surreal as he struggles to find anyone on the plane who doesn't look shifty. He seeks assistance from steely stewardess Nancy (Dockery) and too-helpful passenger Jen (Moore). But everyone begins to wonder if Bill might be the real villain here.

Filmmaker Collet-Serra packs the screen with red herrings, as all of the passengers fire wary glances at each other, moan about the general chaos of the flight and do all of those stupid things that make air travel so tiresome. The only thing missing is a screaming baby. Not that you'd hear it above the crazed panic this cat-and-mouse situation induces. It's so frantic that we barely have time to wonder how someone could get on a plane with a briefcase full of cocaine. Or a bomb. So we just hang on as the turbulence escalates.

Continue reading: Non-stop Review

Premiere Of Universal Pictures And Studiocanal's "Non-Stop"

Joel Silver and and Family - Premiere Of Universal Pictures And Studiocanal's "Non-Stop" At Regency Village Theatre - Westwood, California, United States - Tuesday 25th February 2014

Joel Silver and and Family
Joel Silver and and Family

Who Framed Roger Rabbit? - Clips


Set in 1947, 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' is the story of how cartoon characters known as 'toons' can interact with the living human society. However, after compromising pictures of the human owner of Toontown and Hollywood toon star Roger Rabbit's wife Jessica emerge, he is set up for his subsequent grisly murder and things get tense between the toon world and the real world. Toon hating detective Eddie Valiant is hired to investigate but winds up helping Roger after discovering that he is being framed for a crime he didn't commit. His investigations lead him to the mysterious Judge Doom who's own nature in the toon community is formidable with having found a way to destroy them.

Continue: Who Framed Roger Rabbit? - Clips

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows Review


OK

Ritchie, Downey and Law are back with another manic romp that feels more like a Victorian James Bond adventure than anything about the famed Conan Doyle characters. While it has the same comical energy, it's not quite as fun as the first go-round.

Brilliant Cambridge professor Moriarty (Harris) is up to no good, taking on Holmes (Downey) by messing with those around him, including his girlfriend-nemesis Irene (McAdams) and his partner Watson (Law), who plans to retire after his upcoming wedding to Mary (Reilly). But nothing goes as planned, and Holmes and Watson are propelled into a vicious game of intrigue that sends them to Paris where they team up with a sexy gypsy (Rapace). They also get help from Holmes' brother Mycroft (Fry) as they head to a climactic showdown in Switzerland.

Who needs logic when the action is this wildly exhilarating? And much of it is drastically slowed-down so Ritchie can show us Holmes' powers of deduction as well as whizzing bullets, explosions and other cool-looking things. The dialog is the same mix of faux intelligent banter and shameless innuendo, which gives the actors something to play with, especially as Downey and Law amusingly move beyond bromance into Brokeback territory.

But we do need some logic. This plot is so messy that it never engages us. And as it builds to a climax in a crazy cliff-perched Alpine castle, we begin to lose interest. Even with the bigger action, zingy dialog and colourful characters, this film barely works up any steam. Whenever Holmes isn't being mischievous, Downey actually looks bored. And Rapace is so sidelined that it's difficult to understand why she's here at all; the filmmakers never give her anything interesting to do.

It's a shame the screenwriters never push the characters further. But at least Ritchie keeps things moving briskly, filling the screen with comical nuttiness and big-gun mayhem. Even if Moriarty makes no sense (would someone this intelligent resort to such a ridiculous plan to make his fortune?), Harris adds heft in the role, including some jagged chemistry with Downey. Let's just hope that the requisite third film lets us in on the joke.

Unknown Review


OK
With a Hitchcockian mistaken-identity plot, this film can't help but draw us into its slickly woven web of mystery. Although if we look to closely, each preposterous scene demands us to accept an increasingly wobbly sense of logic.

Martin (Neeson) is a scientist in Berlin with his wife Liz (Jones) for a conference, but he and his taxi driver Gina (Kruger) are involved in an accident that leaves him in a coma for four days. When he wakes up, Liz doesn't know him and insists that another man (Quinn) is actually Martin. Desperate for help, Martin contacts former Stasi agent Jurgen (Ganz), who starts digging into the situation, as well as a trusted colleague (Langella). But ruthless killers (Schneider and Erceg) are on his trail.

Continue reading: Unknown Review

The Losers Review


Weak
Raucous and colourful, this comical action flick should be great fun, but a lack of plot or character development keep it from coming together. And it's not actually that funny or exciting.

On a mission in Bolivia, a five-man black-ops team is betrayed by their power-mad CIA boss Max (Patric) and left for dead. But they embark on a mission to get revenge and clear their names, with Clay (Morgan) leading techie Jensen (Evans), demolition expert Roque (Elba), driver-pilot Pooch (Short) and sniper Cougar (Jaenada). They also enlist the help of a sexy-but-shady woman (Saldana) as they track Max and his vile henchman (McCallany) from Miami to Los Angeles and try to stop his nefarious Bond-like plan.

Continue reading: The Losers Review

The Book of Eli Review


Weak
Although it feels like a parallel story taking place at the same time as The Road, this post-apocalyptic thriller has the opposite effect, actually getting less complex and interesting as it goes along. At least it starts out well.

Eli (Washington) is a loner walking through a decimated American landscape some 30 years after "the war" brought about "the flash". His most precious possession is an old book, and he's willing to fight to the death to protect it as he heads west. Then he stumbles into a roughneck town run by the greedy Carnegie (Oldman), who's searching for the legendary book with his brutal henchman (Stevenson). And when the daughter (Kunis) of Carnegie's blind girlfriend (Beals) runs off after Eli, things get messy.

Continue reading: The Book of Eli Review

Sherlock Holmes Review


Excellent

Raucous, rough energy infuses this film from start to finish, carrying us along even when the slightly over-egged script starts to feel somewhat slender. And it's the terrific chemistry between Downey and Law that makes the film worth seeing.

In Victorian London, private investigator Sherlock Holmes (Downey) is about to lose his partner John Watson (Law), who's moving out to marry his fiancee (Reilly). But the case they've just finished, involving a series of secret-society murders carried out by Lord Blackwood (Strong), just won't end.
Now Holmes' ex Irene (McAdams) is on the scene as well, and things are getting increasingly freaky with more murders and a conspiracy that could lead to a takeover of the whole government. But Holmes' fierce powers of observation are on the case.

The producers blast new life into fusty cinematic stalwarts with their canny choice of director and stars. In many ways this feels more faithful to Arthur Conan Doyle's stories than the dry, cerebral films we're used to. Downey perfectly combines the character's edgy physicality, brainy powers of deduction and sardonic wit. And he and Law are like an hilarious bickering married couple that has lived together just a little too long.

No one else in the cast quite registers. McAdams and Reilly at least play strong-minded women, while Strong glowers satanically from the shadows and Marsan (as the chief inspector) tuts amusingly. The script is mostly smoke and mirrors, weaving in all manner of Holmes' lore, from the original story details to playful references to previous film incarnations (although Holmes never says "elementary", and he never wears a deerstalker).

And if the script isn't nearly as smart as it thinks it is, at least it contains a few nifty twists, including one of the more enjoyable resolutions in recent blockbuster memory. But what we're here for are the fireworks between Downey and Law, a couple of feisty-sexy women and Ritchie-isms like nasty slo-mo fight sequences, witty editing and suggestive lighting. He also offers plenty of refreshingly abrasive vigour to go with the cool effects and a zingy Hans Zimmer score. Bring on the next case.

Orphan Review


OK
For a laughably preposterous thriller, this film is slickly made and much longer than expected. But it's an entertaining addition to the evil child genre, simply for its over-the-top chills and nutty plot.

Kate and John (Farmiga and Sarsgaard) live in a spectacular designer home in the snowy countryside with their bright children Danny and Maxine (Bennett and Engineer), who happens to be deaf. But they have a tormented past, peppered with infidelity, addiction and a tragic miscarriage. They decide to adopt a child to get back on course, and settle for the perky Esther (Fuhrman), a 9-year-old Russian who learns very quickly indeed. She's also up to no good, as the ominous underscore keeps reminding us.

Continue reading: Orphan Review

RocknRolla Review


Excellent
Here's some good news for Guy Ritchie fans. RocknRolla gives off the impression that the once-heralded filmmaker isn't trying so hard any more to jolt, confuse, stimulate, and entertain his demanding followers. As a result, he delivers his most jolting, confusing, stimulating, and flat-out entertaining picture since Snatch in 2000.

RocknRolla is sexy, fast, loose, smart, and extremely funny. It's crammed with colorful criminals, which Ritchie and cinematographer David Higgs backlight to great effect. It chokes on delightfully screwy schemes, which the director and his editor James Herbert slice, tape, and test drive at breakneck speeds. And that's the key. It keeps moving, hardly caring if you are keeping up.

Continue reading: RocknRolla Review

Speed Racer Review


Unbearable
Speed Racer currently leads a race it won't want to win. Right now it's the summer's most irrelevant blockbuster, the first missed opportunity of a still-developing season that hasn't yet entered turn one. Even worse, Racer now sits in the pole position for the undesirable title of Year's Goofiest Movie.

Andy and Larry Wachowski, creators of the Matrix trilogy, contradict themselves from the start. The brothers have written and directed a live-action adaptation of the 1960s anime series that fails to keep a foot in reality. Speed Racer doesn't break new ground; it clings to cartoonish boundaries established by Wile E. Coyote as he pursued that pesky Road Runner. If The Matrix taught the pseudo-spiritual Neo that there was no spoon, then Speed Racer posits that there is no camera. Instead, the Wachowskis are free to bend and twist reality as they create their vibrant environments in high-tech computers. The effect imbues Racer with the depth and dramatic significance of a screen saver.

Continue reading: Speed Racer Review

Joel Silver

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