Joel Michaely

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'Mantervention' premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Joel Michaely - 'Mantervention' premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 18th July 2014

Joel Michaely

'Isolated' Premiere

Joel Michaely - 'Isolated' Premiere at Equinox Sports Club - Los Angeles, California , United States - Thursday 18th April 2013

Joel Michaely

Vamps Trailer


Stacey and Goody are two vampires cursed to remain young and beautiful forever after being bitten and changed in the 19th Century. Whilst they have dated numerous men in the past, they still prove to be putty in the hands of love when Stacey falls for the son of the notorious vampire hunter Dr Van Helsing. Joey Van Helsing is equally as taken with her as she is with him, however his father immediately knows Stacey's secret and tries to warn Joey but to no avail. He gets together an angry mob of hunters who threaten to expose the coffin-lounging lady vamps to the sunlight they hate so much - always being slaves to the night when they spend their time partying. When Goody meets her dream man from years ago, both girls are faced with a choice: eternal immortality or love.

This side-splitting Rom Com is a brilliantly light-hearted take on the classic vampire; the perfect comic relief after the serious subject matter of modern vamp stories 'Twilight', 'True Blood' and 'Vampire Diaries'. It has been directed and written by Amy Heckerling; the writer of high-school parody series 'Clueless' and movies 'Loser' and 'Look Who's Talking' and has the same hilarious style of humour that has captured audiences since the '90s. 'Vamps' is set for release on November 2nd 2012 in the USA.

Starring: Alicia Silverstone, Krysten Ritter, Richard Lewis, Sigourney Weaver, Wallace Shawn, Justin Kirk, Malcolm McDowell, Zak Orth, Marilu Henner, Scott Thomson, Todd Barry, Kristen Johnston, Natalie Gal, Meredith Scott Lynn, Joel Michaely and Dan Stevens.

She Wants Me Cast Celebrates DVD Release at TABU Nightclub at MGM Grand Resort and Casino

Joel Michaely - Kristen Ruhlin, Joel Michaely Saturday 8th September 2012 She Wants Me Cast Celebrates DVD Release at TABU Nightclub at MGM Grand Resort and Casino

Joel Michaely
Joel Michaely
Joel Michaely

She Wants Me Cast Celebrates DVD Release at TABU Nightclub at MGM Grand Resort and Casino

Joel Michaely Saturday 8th September 2012 She Wants Me Cast Celebrates DVD Release at TABU Nightclub at MGM Grand Resort and Casino

Joel Michaely
Joel Michaely

Celeste and Jesse Forever Trailer


Celeste and Jesse have been best friends since high school and married each other very young. Many years later, they have reached their thirties and while Celeste is a successful business woman, Jesse has failed to mature with age and remains unemployed and unmotivated. Celeste believes the right thing to do is to file for a divorce as her life progresses away from him. He agrees, although he still loves her, but the pair remain inseparable friends as they begin to see other people. They are told that they should start dating again if they are unwilling to let each other go, however, Jesse soon finds another girl to fall in love with and Celeste's world comes crashing down around her as she realises she's made a huge mistake. As everything begins to warp and change in their lives, they start to learn that they may have to abandon their precious friendship in order for their hearts to heal.

Continue: Celeste and Jesse Forever Trailer

The Quiet Review


Terrible
A film that does its best to make the horrendous palatable, and the unthinkable titillating, The Quiet can be either (depending on your taste) a wrenching experience, or merely worth a giggle. It is, after all, a film about a deaf-mute teenaged girl named Dot (Camilla Belle), sent to live with her weird godparents and their popular cheerleader Nina (Elisha Cuthbert) after her father dies -- so really one can only take it so seriously. Clichés are the order of the day, with bitchy cheerleaders ruling the high school cafeteria and deep, nasty secrets discovered by people who just happen to be walking down darkened hallways in the depths of night. And if one has to ask whether this seemingly placid suburban environment is about to be torn asunder by scandal, one really hasn't watched enough television.

Director Jamie Babbit hardly showed much promise with her debut film, the stiff, one-note 1999 comedy But I'm a Cheerleader, but one would have thought that the intervening years spent directing episodes of such sharp TV comedies as Malcolm in the Middle and Gilmore Girls would have honed her talent somewhat. No such luck. The Quiet is so tone-deaf that when it should be eliciting sympathy or empathy, it comes off as simply amateur comedy -- Pretty Persuasion without the guts. She's put together a good enough cast here, with Edie Falco and Martin Donovan playing Nina's parents (the former a prescription-medication-zonked stereotype and the latter a creepy and controlling menace), though they're mostly marooned amidst the cartoonish plot of adolescent brooding and familial dysfunction. As Dot, Belle is stuck with providing her dialogue via maudlin voiceover ("I am invisible") while Cuthbert has to do what she can with a script that sends her character ping-ponging between damaged, vulnerable victim and Heathers-esque school-dominating bitch.

Continue reading: The Quiet Review

The Quiet Review


Terrible
A film that does its best to make the horrendous palatable, and the unthinkable titillating, The Quiet can be either (depending on your taste) a wrenching experience, or merely worth a giggle. It is, after all, a film about a deaf-mute teenaged girl named Dot (Camilla Belle), sent to live with her weird godparents and their popular cheerleader Nina (Elisha Cuthbert) after her father dies -- so really one can only take it so seriously. Clichés are the order of the day, with bitchy cheerleaders ruling the high school cafeteria and deep, nasty secrets discovered by people who just happen to be walking down darkened hallways in the depths of night. And if one has to ask whether this seemingly placid suburban environment is about to be torn asunder by scandal, one really hasn't watched enough television.Director Jamie Babbit hardly showed much promise with her debut film, the stiff, one-note 1999 comedy But I'm a Cheerleader, but one would have thought that the intervening years spent directing episodes of such sharp TV comedies as Malcolm in the Middle and Gilmore Girls would have honed her talent somewhat. No such luck. The Quiet is so tone-deaf that when it should be eliciting sympathy or empathy, it comes off as simply amateur comedy -- Pretty Persuasion without the guts. She's put together a good enough cast here, with Edie Falco and Martin Donovan playing Nina's parents (the former a prescription-medication-zonked stereotype and the latter a creepy and controlling menace), though they're mostly marooned amidst the cartoonish plot of adolescent brooding and familial dysfunction. As Dot, Belle is stuck with providing her dialogue via maudlin voiceover ("I am invisible") while Cuthbert has to do what she can with a script that sends her character ping-ponging between damaged, vulnerable victim and Heathers-esque school-dominating bitch.And what to make of this script by Abdi Nazemian and Micah Schraft? Undoubtedly they believed they were crafting a dark little drama about suburbia's seamy underbelly, with a symbolism-laden deaf-mute protagonist to act as a bid for arthouse cred. Instead they've put together a crude mash-up of teenage cruelty -- Nina tries so hard to make life hell for her new sister that you can almost see the sweat beads on her brow -- and stock representations of parental hypocrisy, with a persistent undertone of sexual perversity that veers more than once into leering exploitation. Nina's best friend, the ultra-slutty Michelle (Katy Mixon), has a porn fixation, while the object of her X-rated lunchtime conversation, the star basketball player, Connor (Shawn Ashmore), appears sexually attracted to Dot simply because of her passivity.Although the balance of The Quiet pivots around the revelation of two shock twists, they're both so predictable that even Desperate Housewives wouldn't stoop to using them. Director Babbit's handling of the fallout from these twists, which should have been heavily emotional material, careens instead quite quickly into high camp of a sort that's quite impossible to enjoy without a stiff drink -- or three.

But I'm A Cheerleader Review


Grim
Take director John Waters and give him a really good actress like Natasha Lyonne, a paltry budget of, say, $1 million, and ask him to make a satire about a "gay rehab camp," and you might come up with something like But I'm a Cheerleader.

Then again, Waters might have come up with something funny, like Pecker. With such a meaty topic as Family Values ripe for a send-up, you'd think it would be easy to milk Cheerleader for comic value. Unfortunately, first-time feature director Jamie Babbit (whose few credits including directing the MTV series Undressed and acting as script supervisor on The Game) doesn't appear to have much ability behind the camera, which becomes painfully apparent after only a few minutes.

Continue reading: But I'm A Cheerleader Review

The Rules Of Attraction Review


Weak

Like an episode of MTV's barely-legal late-night dorm life soap "Undressed," with 20 times the creativity but without any more substance, "The Rules of Attraction" is a stylish, glib, endemically energetic diversion that's indulgently entertaining but could have and should have been deeper.

Enthusiastically adapted by Roger Avery (co-writer of "Pulp Fiction" and writer-director of "Killing Zoe") from the whimsically subversive novel by Bret Easton Ellis, it's a black comedy about the feral underbelly of modern campus life, full of cinematic invention but narrative superficiality.

Populated by teen-TV lightweight types trying to gain edgy credibility, "Rules" stars James Van Der Beek ("Dawson's Creek") in the movie's most resonant performance as antihero Sean Bateman, a deviant college cool-jerk -- who, for the trivia-minded, is the younger brother of the title character in Ellis's "American Psycho."

Continue reading: The Rules Of Attraction Review

Joel Michaely

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