After her movie The Beaver bombed in the U.S. -- it has earned only $310,000 after two weekends in limited release -- Jodie Foster is hoping that it will find greater acceptance in Europe. Her hopes were No Doubt lifted when cheers erupted following an out-of-competition screening of the movie at the Cannes Film Festival today (Tuesday). At a news conference following the screening Foster said that it was never meant to attract a broad audience. "It's a special film; it's not for everybody," she said, noting that it was always intended to be an indie film with a kind of "European formality." In any case, she maintained, she had never considered the commercial potential of the film. "If you start thinking audiences will like this better, audiences will like that better, then you make a terrible film." As she has in previous interviews, Foster praised Mel Gibson's performance in the movie and said that Gibson himself "is incredibly proud of the movie, proud of what he's shown [about himself]." Referring to the notorious reports about Gibson's anti-Semitic remarks following his DUI arrest and his recorded threats to his onetime girlfriend, Foster said, "I can't excuse Mel's behavior." Then, while insisting that he was a "complicated" individual, she called Gibson "somebody who is probably the most-loved actor in Hollywood." Gibson himself did not take part in the press conference, but Foster indicated that he will be present on the red carpet for tonight's (Tuesday) screening in Cannes. "He won't be talking but he will be here," she said.