Joan Cusack

Joan Cusack

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The End Of The Tour Trailer


Sometimes, the biggest life lessons are the ones learned by other people. For someone desperate to earn the fame and recognition they rightly deserve, it can serve as an important revelation to see an ordinary person have fame thrust upon them. So goes the story of David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg), a young novelist and writer for Rolling Stone magazine, who spent five days with David Foster Wallace (Jason Segel) over the course of his book tour. Lipsky wanted to have everything that Wallace had, but when Wallace was faced with the news that his novel had become a New York Times bestseller, his life was set to change forever.

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Welcome To Me Trailer


Oprah obsessed Alice Klieg suffers from Borderline Personality Disorder which causes her to be socially awkward, impulsive and stubborn, and she's about to find out that money truly can buy you anything. After winning an impressive $86 million in the lottery, her first port of call is a major TV station, where she pitches an idea for hosting her own talk show. They offer her a slot at a cool $15 million, and she subsequently decides to stop taking her medication and pursue fame and recognition. The only problem is, she sucks at hosting her own show. The producers know they have to do something to save their embarrassment over this fiasco of a deal, but with Alice stuck in her own world and resolutely ignoring advice from friends and family, there's not a lot they can do to help her.

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2013 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards Arrivals

Joan Cusack - 2013 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards Arrivals Held at Nokia Theatre LA Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 16th September 2013

Joan Cusack

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Review


Excellent

Spikier than the average coming-of-age movie, this astute comedy-drama is packed with memorable characters and resonant situations. It's also strikingly intelligent, refusing to accept Hollywood's fake moralising as it grapples with big issues from mental health to bullying. And even better, it's funny and sexy.

Set in the early 1990s, it's the story of the painfully shy Charlie (Lerman), who plans to blend into the background as he starts high school. Scarred by an emotional event in his past, the only new friend he makes is his English teacher (Rudd). Then his sharp wit is spotted by the colourful Patrick (Miller), an anarchic gay teen who doesn't care what people think. Patrick also has a sexy stepsister, Sam (Watson), who takes a liking to Charlie as well, and soon they become inseparable friends. Well, until Charlie loses his nerve to ask Sam out and ends up in a relationship with her friend Mary Elizabeth (Whitman) instead.

After some less-than-thrilling lead roles (such as Percy Jackson or last year's Three Musketeers remake), Lerman finally comes into his own here with a sensitive, intelligent performance that's nicely underplayed. He also has terrific chemistry with Watson and Miller, whose feisty, hilarious love of life fills every scene they're in. They make such a strong trio that we are deeply moved by each rocky shift in their friendship. And Whitman brings a sparky energy to her scenes as the Buddhist punk with a bracingly honest approach to whatever happens.

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John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack, Jack Black, Joan Cusack and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - John Cusack, Joan Cusack, Jack Black Tuesday 24th April 2012 John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack, Joan Cusack and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - John Cusack and Joan Cusack with Family and Friends Tuesday 24th April 2012 John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton, Jack Black, Joan Cusack and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - John Cusack, Joan Cusack, Jack Black, Billy Bob Thornton Tuesday 24th April 2012 John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

John Cusack, Joan Cusack and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - John Cusack and Joan Cusack Tuesday 24th April 2012 John Cusack honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame held on Hollywood Blvd

Arthur Christmas Review


Good
This lively holiday romp has a steady stream of sharp verbal and visual gags that hold our interest. Even when the plot stalls in the middle, it's difficult to stop chuckling at the filmmakers' deranged sense of humour.

At the North Pole, Santa (Broadbent) is a bit complacent after 70 years on the job, letting his heir-apparent son Steve (Laurie) convert Christmas Eve into a high-tech black-ops style mission executed with military precision. To Steve, missing one child is an insignificant statistic. But Steve's younger brother Arthur (McAvoy) disagrees, and teams up with his feisty Grandsanta (Nighy) to make sure the last gift is delivered the old fashioned way.

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Mars Needs Moms Review


Weak
Like Zemeckis' A Christmas Carol, this animated adventure features an uneven mix of not-quite-right realism and fantastical imagery. It's enjoyable enough, but a live-action movie with a better script would have been much more engaging.

Surly 9-year-old Milo (performed by Green with Seth Dursky's voice) is annoyed by the way his mother (Cusack) runs an efficient house. But this is precisely what the Martian Supervisor (Sterling) needs to help her raise her regimented planet's female population (the useless males are sent to an underground rubbish tip). After Milo accidentally hitches a ride to Mars, he's found by a human, Gribble (Fogler), who's hiding underground. And they meet a friendly Martian (Harnois) who wants to help them find and rescue Mom.

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Mars Needs Moms Trailer


Milo is a typical boy, anything that's good for him, he doesn't really like. His mom is always telling him to eat his greens, but he always tries to find ways around eating dreadful things like broccoli. As far as Milo's concerned, what do moms really know? He'll do just fine on his own. But all is about to change when Milo's mom is abducted by aliens.

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Toy Story 3 Review


Essential
Pixar's keystone franchise takes on the tone of its more serious recent films (Wall-E and Up), mixing comedy, action and emotion in a way that's pure magic: we end up laughing, frightened and crying tears of both dismay and joy.

Andy (Morris) is getting ready to go to university, so the toys are preparing to be deposited in the attic. But a mix-up sees Woody (Hanks), Buzz (Allen) and pals sent instead to Sunnyside Daycare, an apparently happy place with no end of children to play with them. Except they're put in the terrible 2's room. And the leader of the Sunnyside toys, Lots-o-Huggin Bear (Beatty) is more like a prison warden. After a series of adventures, the toys must plot an elaborate escape.

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Toy Story 2 [in 3D] Review


Excellent
While this film looks terrific in 3D, it doesn't quite stand up over time.

There's an odd sense of dragging in the middle, and some of the action sequences feel like they never quite crank up to high gear.

On the other hand, the film is a series of gorgeously conceived set pieces and terrific character interaction and, unlike newer films, it's not afraid to get a bit grim. Stinky Pete's character is especially well-realised, right through to the anarchic closing-credit outtakes. As with most good sequels, the secret is to create strong new characters, and Stinky Pete certainly does that. It's also great to have Barbie in this world.

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Toy Story 3 Trailer


Watch the teaser trailer for Toy Story 3

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Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Review


Grim
Quick -- name three subjects you think would result in a surefire family film hit. If you said The Great Depression, hobo culture, and the social pariah realities of both, you are clearly one of the suits that saw fit to greenlight Kit Kittredge: An American Girl. Granted, this starring vehicle for Little Miss Sunshine's Abigail Breslin, does fit her perky Oscar-nominated spunk to a T. But the dour backdrop of America in the throes of a bleak fiscal future, along with the resulting rampant homelessness, is enough to give modern audiences some substantial mortgage crisis déjà-vu.

When her dad (Chris O'Donnell) loses his car dealership and heads off to Chicago to look for work, Cincinnati's own Kit Kittredge (Breslin) helps her mother (Julia Ormond) turn the family home into a boarding house. There, they take in several guests, including the snooty Mrs. Howard (Glenne Hedley) and her son Sterling (Zach Mills), wacky mobile librarian Miss Bonds (Joan Cusack), doe-eyed dance instructor Miss Dooley (Jane Krakowski), and struggling magician Mr. Berk (Stanley Tucci). When a string of crimes is linked to a rise in the transient population, Kit puts on her wannabe-reporter's hat and investigates. Her goal: to become the youngest journalist on the city paper and discover the truth of what's going on.

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Joan Cusack

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