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Drea de Matteo and Jimmy Smits - Charlie Hunnam signed autographs for awaiting fans as he rides off home on his Harley Davidson motorcycle after filming his hit show Son's Of Anarchy in downtown Los Angeles. The british actor was on set with co stars Drea De Matteo and Jimmy Smits who was in a low rider classic car. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 17th June 2014

Drea De Matteo and Jimmy Smits
Drea De Matteo
Drea De Matteo
Drea De Matteo
Drea De Matteo
Drea De Matteo

Charlie Hunnam, Tommy Flanagan and Jimmy Smits - Actor Charlie Hunnam spotted on the first day of shooting the final season of thier hit show "Sons Of Anarchy" filming in downtown Los Angeles. Charlie is back to his old ways of being a biker as he finish filming his other project "Crimson Peak" filming in Canada. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 29th May 2014

Charlie Hunnam, Tommy Flanagan and Jimmy Smits
Charlie Hunnam
Charlie Hunnam and Tommy Flanagan
Charlie Hunnam
Charlie Hunnam and Tommy Flanagan
Charlie Hunnam

Jimmy Smits - FX Networks Upfront Premiere Screening Of 'Fargo' at SVA Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 10th April 2014

Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits and Kelsey Grammer
Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - Television Academy presents an 'Evening with Sons of Anarchy' held at Leonard H. Goldenson Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Friday 25th October 2013

Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - FX's "Sons Of Anarchy" Season 6 Premiere Screening Held at Dolby Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 8th September 2013

Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - FX's "Sons Of Anarchy" Season 6 Premiere Screening Held at Dolby Theatre - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 7th September 2013

Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits and Katey Sagal - Jimmy Smits, Katey Sagal Monday 1st October 2012 Celebrities at The Grove to appear on entertainment news show 'Extra'

Jimmy Smits and Katey Sagal
Jimmy Smits, Katey Sagal and Mario Lopez
Jimmy Smits, Katey Sagal and Mario Lopez
Jimmy Smits and Katey Sagal
Jimmy Smits, Katey Sagal and Mario Lopez
Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - Thursday 28th October 2010 at ABC New York City, USA

Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - Friday 30th July 2010 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits
David Ramsey, Jesse Bradford and Jimmy Smits

Jimmy Smits - Monday 17th May 2010 at NBC New York City, USA

Jimmy Smits
Jimmy Smits

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Price Of Glory Review


OK
Father knows best. Ex-boxer Arturo Ortega (Jimmy Smits, Bless the Child) has placed his three sons on the assembly line for success, manufacturing them into perfect fighting champions. With his high intensity training, they'll be given the opportunities he never had. When his kids grow up and each decides to pursue opportunities in and out of the ring, the family unit starts to crumble. Can they weather the Price of Glory?

The standard repertoire of confrontation, hope, and tragedy all fall into place. Arturo thinks one of his boys doesn't have the makings of a champion, but maybe he isn't looking hard enough. Another son (Jon Seda, Selena) wants to get married, but settling down could ruin his shot at the big title. Familiar archetypes emerge and follow their routes to a traditional grand finale.

Continue reading: Price Of Glory Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review


Excellent
All good things must come to an end, and all sort-of mediocre things eventually peter out, too.

And so we're faced with the third Star Wars prequel, Revenge of the Sith, simultaneously the most anticipated and dreaded film of the summer. Nearly a decade of hype, dashed expectations, and Jar-Jar Binks jokes have finally come down to this, Lucas's third Star Wars prequel and, by all accounts, the last Star Wars movie that will ever be made.

Continue reading: Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review

The Million Dollar Hotel Review


Weak
Three words: Story by Bono.

Yikes! This marginal flick puts detective Mel Gibson in charge of investigating the murder of a billionnaire's son in a wacky hotel overrun by mental patients who can't afford the regular nut bin. And well, that's about all there is to tell, except that the title was once The Billion Dollar Hotel. That's a big downgrade.

Continue reading: The Million Dollar Hotel Review

Bless The Child Review


Bad
Yes, August is upon us and with it comes the second appearance of the twice-yearly dumping ground for Hollywood. Like the February doldrums, August brings us films filled with fading stars and awful storylines that weren't deemed good enough to break even after a big summer marketing campaign, nor will they be able to go toe to toe with meatier fare during Oscar season.

And to open August, enter Bless the Child, possibly the worst movie I've seen this year. Well, after Mission to Mars.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

Star Wars: Episode II - Attack Of The Clones Review


Good

Spider-Man's hype and box office may have stolen some of Episode II's thunder, but Attack of the Clones finally arrives, three years after its predecessor, The Phantom Menace, and picking up the story 10 years after that installment let off.

The story is considerably more convoluted this time out. Former Queen Amidala (Natalie Portman) is now a senator in the Republic, and nefarious parties are repeatedly attempting to have her assassinated. Assigned to protect her are Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor) and a growing-up Anakin Skywalker (Hayden Christensen), now Obi-Wan's apprentice. Soon, Jedi bosses Yoda and Mace Windu (Samuel L. Jackson) split the two up: Obi-Wan is tasked with tracking down the bounty hunter who tried to kill Amidala (which turns out to be Jango Fett (Temuera Morrison), father/clone of young Boba Fett). Anakin is tasked with serving as Amidala's bodyguard.

Obi-Wan scours a "secret" watery planet (there discovering a massing clone army allegedly purchased for the Republic ten years ago), and then tracks Jango to another planet, where he finds the opposition led by (try not to snicker) Count Dooku (Christopher Lee), who is amassing a droid army for war against the Republic.

Meanwhile, Amidala and Anakin fall in love (awwwwwwwwwwwww), but since she's a politician and he's a Jedi (bound to supress emotion -- which just ain't takin'), they have to keep their romance a secret (just like in The Bodyguard!).

Side stories galore take characters all over the galaxy far, far away... including the inevitable stop on Tatooine to help Anakin's mother and long spells on Coruscant, the 100%-urban capital planet.

On to the nagging questions: Foremost, Jar-Jar is back, and his part is not insubstantial; the character is as grating as ever. But all eyes are on Christensen, and he fills the shoes of Skywalker admirably, though he has apparently been given the sole direction to act like a really bratty teenager.

The use of CGI is on overload, and while many of the sets (real or digital) are quite successful, many of the backdrops are not -- notably the cheesy oceans on the clone planet and an especially flat cathedral-like hallway Yoda scoots through. When the CGI interacts with real-world elements (like when Anakin rides a fat sheep-like creature), the effect is about as believable as Barney being a real dinosaur.

Also out of place is the movie's silly patriotism, with frequent pontification about loving democracy (and this from a former queen -- albeit an "elected" queen... uh, okay) and the Republic. One speech actually includes the earnestly corny line, "The day we stop believing in democracy is the day we lose it!" I say the day Star Wars becomes nothing more than a political platform is the day we lose it.

At 2 1/2 hours in length, this installment is a bit long-winded and bladder-challenging (compared to 2:13 for Episode I and a little over 2 hours for A New Hope), but the decision to go "epic" at least makes room for lots of action when Amidala and Anakin aren't busy smooching. The action starts right at the beginning, with an impressive skycar chase through Coruscant, and ends with an equally smashing "big battle scene" that easily outdoes the one in Menace. Best of all, though, is the already famous Yoda light-saber battle, which is as funny as it is thrilling. That said, the pod race in Phantom is still probably the best action sequence in the series so far.

Less impressive are the talky parts, which haltingly attempt to create a romance between Amidala and Anakin. The love story just doesn't work and it's very awkward, maybe because George Lucas is simply out of touch with the realities of youthful romance, or maybe because the leads didn't have chemistry. I don't know for sure. I do know, however, that if Anakin Skywalker is going to play the cool outcast he shouldn't act like a baby around his would-be girlfriend. And Amidala's 11th hour confession of love comes completely out of left field, a necessary plot point because we know she has to eventually bear two kids by the guy.

In fact, much of Episode II feels like it's ticking off items to make sure we get to the appropriate state of the galaxy by the end of 2005's Episode III. There's still a long way to go -- Anakin has to turn evil and disfigured; Amidala has to have two kids, split them up, and have one become the princess of a planet still not introduced in the series; Yoda and Obi-Wan have to become hermits; and then there's the matter of the Death Star, which has to be built. Episode III is either going to be a complete disaster or a work of genius.

Altogether, the movie is enjoyable despite its nagging script inadequacies and crummy "down" scenes. The action is fun, the acting is good enough, and the direction is capable, if not inspired. If you're a die-hard Star Wars fan, you will like this better than Episode I (though I grade them roughly equal), but it still won't hold a candle to the earlier films.

But chances are when it's said and done, you aren't going to be talking about Episode II for its good things. An impromptu conversation with another filmcritic.com staffer set us off on a number of incongruities and simply baffling moments that might be pointing to Lucas's senility. For example: When did R2-D2 become able to fly? When did Obi-Wan become afraid of flying (or afraid of anything for that matter)? What's with Jimmy Smits and his Elizabethan collar? Since when does a Jedi Knight have to go to a library to figure out where a planet is? And why didn't Lucas get the hint about Jar-Jar Binks the first time around?

Mysteries of the universe, I tell ya.

The DVD answers few of these mysteries, with eight deleted scenes (see Natalie Portman lose her accent!) and various effects-oriented documentaries. There's even a trailer for a mockumentary about R2-D2. Amusing.

Teddy bears' picnic.

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review


Very Good
Here's your "Revenge of the Sith" review in a nutshell: It may well be the best of all six "StarWars" movies -- with the caveat that you need to have seen the other five films to truly grasp its significance.

The cunning dexterity and gravitas with which George Lucas snaps into place every remaining puzzle piece in his epic 30-year storyarc is remarkable. The talent of Hayden Christensen will surprise his detractors as he portrays a complex, compounding crisis of conflicting loyalties thattear Anakin Skywalker apart, leading him to slip ever more rapidly toward the Dark Side of the Force. The potent sensations of betrayal and inevitabilitythat fuel the climactic duel between the young Jedi knight and his former master Obi-Wan Kenobi are positively goosepimpling, even though every "StarWars" fan knows the outcome and has been waiting for this moment for years.

These elements, coupled with much improved dialogue, far fewer scenes transparently designed to foster inevitable tie-in video games,and genuinely compelling emotions make up for the myriad of shortcomings that plagued the previoustwo"Star Wars" prequels.

Opening in the midst the Clone Wars between the crumbling galactic republic and an alliance of separatists that is really a frontfor the evil Sith Lords (all those villains called "Darth This" and "Darth That"), "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge ofthe Sith" is surprisingly character-driven. The plot revolves around the volatile, brash young Anakin being appointed by the increasingly powerfulChancellor Palpatine (soon to be revealed as Darth Sidious) to be his personal representative on the Jedi Council, which has for centuries tried to maintainpeace in this galaxy far, far away.

Continue reading: Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review

Bless The Child Review


Terrible

Re-enforcing their stuck-in-B-list status, Kim Basinger and Jimmy Smits star this week in a laughably gothic second-coming chiller, "Bless the Child," which once again commandeers Catholic dogma as a jumping-off point for a half-witted, high-gloss horror movie.

Like "Stigmata" and "End of Days" before it, "Bless the Child" invents its own "previously undiscovered" Biblical mythology to propel its story about a battle for the soul of an abandoned 6-year-old girl (Holliston Coleman) named Cody, who -- it is implied -- is the reincarnation of Christ.

Kim Basinger plays her aunt Maggie, a New York City psychiatric nurse who's strung-out younger sister (Angela Bettis, "Girl Interrupted") drops the infant girl on her doorstep and disappears. Maggie -- an agnostic, as all religious chiller heroes are at first -- raises Cody and gradually begins to realize (much more gradually than the audience) that the child has supernatural gifts. Rocking back and forth while ain't-it-eerie monk chants reverberate on the soundtrack, Cody makes plates spin with telekinetic power, lights candles just by staring at them intently and brings back to life pigeons that smack into windows.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

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Jimmy Smits Movies

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Movie Review

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Movie Review

With the tagline "A Star Wars Story", this first spin-off from the saga isn't actually...

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Trailer

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Trailer

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is a standalone Star Wars film which acts as...

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Trailer

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Trailer

The Galaxy is on the brink of a major war being won by dangerous rulers...

Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer

Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer

After five long years, the Clone Wars are still raging across the galaxy. Count Dooku...

Mother and Child Movie Review

Mother and Child Movie Review

An excellent ensemble makes the most of a multi-strand female-centred film that drifts very close...

Mother & Child Trailer

Mother & Child Trailer

Adoption is a life changing situation for all involved.The woman who feels she must give...

The Jane Austen Book Club Movie Review

The Jane Austen Book Club Movie Review

You need neither a deep appreciation for author Jane Austen nor an understanding of her...

Price of Glory Movie Review

Price of Glory Movie Review

Father knows best. Ex-boxer Arturo Ortega (Jimmy Smits, Bless the Child) has placed his...

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

All good things must come to an end, and all sort-of mediocre things eventually peter...

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