Jimmi Simpson

Jimmi Simpson

Jimmi Simpson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

21st Annual SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards

Derek Cecil, Michael Kelly, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Joanna Going and Rachel Brosnahan - 21st Annual SAG (Screen Actors Guild) Awards at Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center - Arrivals at Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

21st Annual SAG Awards

Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going
Derek Cecil, Mozhan Marno, Jimmi Simpson, Michael Kelly, Molly Parker, Michael Gill, Jayne Atkinson, Rachel Brosnahan and Joanna Going

Special Screening Of Netflix's "House Of Cards" Season 2

Jimmi Simpson - Special Screening Of Netflix's "House Of Cards" Season 2 At Directors Guild Of America - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th February 2014

Jimmi Simpson
Jimmi Simpson
Jimmi Simpson
Jimmi Simpson

White House Down Review


Good

This may look exactly like Gerard Butler's over-serious Olympus Has Fallen, but it's actually that film's smarter, sillier younger brother: the one you like even though you really shouldn't. As he did with 2012, filmmaker Emmerich has injected this huge action romp with a generous dose of tongue-in-cheek humour while never sacrificing the overwrought spectacle. So even if it's wildly contrived and ludicrously patriotic, it's so gleefully destructive that we can't help but have a lot of fun.

It starts out as ex-military man John (Tatum) tries to impress his estranged 11-year-old daughter Emily (King) by taking her along with him on a job interview at the White House. At that moment, home-grown terrorists strike, led by a disgruntled security chief (Woods). In the chaos, John gets separated from Emily, and as he looks for her he stumbles across the US President (Foxx). As John and the President work to subvert the villains, the politically savvy Emily is posting videos of them on YouTube, which helps the Pentagon command centre, overseen by security chief Carol (Gyllenhaal) and Speaker Raphelson (Jenkins), keep the nation from falling apart. But it turns out that one of the baddies (Clarke) has a personal vendetta against John.

As always, Emmerich infuses the film with a sombre tone then undermines it at every step with witty irony. Each scene is packed with quirky characters, snappy one-liners, knowingly corny sentimentality and bigger-than-necessary mayhem. For example, he manages to wedge a full-on car chase into the White House grounds, complete with a rocket launcher. At the centre, Tatum and Foxx are a lively double-act, bouncing off each other with feisty energy. Furrowed-brow gravitas is supplied by Gyllenhaal, Jenkins and Woods, while scene-stealers include King's plucky young hero and Simpson's megalomaniac hacker.

Continue reading: White House Down Review

Everything Is Ours - After Party

Jimmi Simpson - Opening night after party for the play 'Everything Is Ours' held at the Emerald Pub. - New York, NY, United States - Wednesday 4th September 2013

Celebrities arrive at Salt Lake City International Airport

Jimmi Simpson - Celebrities arrive at Salt Lake City International Airport Salt Lake City Utah United States Thursday 17th January 2013

Melanie Lynskey Announces Divorce From Husband Jimmi Simpson


Melanie Lynskey Jimmi Simpson

Melanie Lynskey, star of Two And A Half Men, has announced her divorce from her Always Sunny In Philadelphia acting husband Jimmi Simpson, according to a report by TMZ. The news was reported last week by the gossip website, with the couple apparently citing irreconcilable differences behind the split. The papers were filed on September 25, 2012, bringing to a formal end to a marriage that began in 2007. The pair had been separated since April of this year, so the news comes as no great shock, but does seem a shame given the apparently amicable parting of the two. Both have apparently waived their right to receive spousal support.

A quick look at Lynskey's Twitter shows that she's been quiet on the subject of the divorce, instead focusing her attentions on the Canadian music group who she saw play over the weekend. " music lovers" she wrote. "If you're not going to see @teganandsara tonight at Staples Centre you're missing out! They sounded AMAZING last night." There was no mention on her Twitter about the divorce on the day that the papers were filed either, on September 25th.

The divorce puts a sour note on an otherwise good year for Lynskey, with the star appearing in three movies this year including the recently released The Perks Of Being A Wallflower.

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Review


Good
A riotous combination of rah-rah American patriotism and overwrought special effects nonsense, this cheeky bit of fantasy history is rather good fun. Yes, it's also completely ridiculous, but the visual flair and fast pace keep us happily entertained.

Young Abe Lincoln (Walker) is determined to get revenge against the sinister Barts (Czokas), who had something to do with his mother's death. But it turns out that Barts is immortal, so Abe's new friend Henry (Cooper) trains him in how to fight vampires. Meanwhile, Abe pursues a career in politics, marries Mary (Winstead) and discovers that the alpha vampire (Sewell) is using the Civil War as a cover for bloodsuckers to take over America. Along with his intrepid friends (Mackie and Simpson), Abe sets out to turn the tide at Gettysburg.

Continue reading: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Review

Date Night Review


Excellent
The presence of Carell and Fey lifts this comedy far beyond what it could have been. Their sharp improvisational skills give us a terrific look at a slightly tired marriage, even as the plot gets increasingly trite.

Phil and Claire (Carell and Fey) are a typically frazzled New Jersey suburban couple with two lively kids and no real time to connect with each other. Even their regular date nights seem to get easily derailed. Then they plan an evening in the city, which takes a surprise twist when they're mistakenly cornered by a couple of gun-pointing thugs (Simpson and Common) who are working for a notorious mob boss (Liotta). Now on the run, they seek help from a well-connected old contact (Wahlberg), while a cop (Henson) is tenaciously on their tails.

Continue reading: Date Night Review

Stay Alive Review


Terrible
It's a horror plot so surefire that you wonder why it hasn't been done before: Young people play a mysterious new videogame and start to die, one by one, in grisly scenes mimicking their game deaths. Stay Alive runs through this plot with such a plodding lack of imagination that you think again: Maybe this has been done before, on The X-Files or a direct-to-video picture you missed. Surely a movie this tired can't be the first crack at a fundamentally decent genre idea?

Stay Alive gets around this conundrum easily by knocking off The Ring and throwing in a little of the Final Destination series: the former's ghostly gimmick mixed with the latter's view of life as an elaborate series of macabre booby traps. Unfortunately, even the cut-and-paste is botched; no Ring-style tension builds, and the PG-13 rating curtails the death scenes, most of which all but cut away before the character's gory fate is sealed. Yes, you read that right: Stay Alive is like a Final Destination movie without the death scenes.

Continue reading: Stay Alive Review

Loser Review


Weak
If you're a cynic, you might wonder when Amy Heckerling (director of the utterly vapid Clueless) lost touch with the youth of America. I'm inclined to believe it was in 1982, right after the release of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, her only good movie, which she made when she was only 28.

Now in her mid-forties, it's rather depressing to see Heckerling using the same jokes that worked almost two decades ago. And for a movie that uses "Dare to be different" as its tagline, it's almost pathetic that this story is lifted virtually verbatim from Fast Times, with the Mark Ratner-Stacy Hamilton romance going awry once again. Brian Backer, who starred as Ratner, is even back in a small role.

Continue reading: Loser Review

D.E.B.S. Review


Grim
Somewhat like watching the Disney Channel's girl-power prime-time lineup through a muddled exploitation-lite filter, D.E.B.S. is a patently ridiculous teen-spies scenario that's played mostly for laughs but oddly enough only works when it's being downright sincere.

The film imagines that there's an entire wing of the national intelligence apparatus composed of nubile young women in tarty schoolgirl outfits (knee socks, plaid miniskirts, the whole bit) selected by how they answered questions buried in the SATs that secretly test for espionage aptitude. The starring quartet of hotties soon to graduate from the D.E.B.S. academy are: straight-A and dishwater dull Amy (Sara Foster, her blonde hair making her the star), chain-smoking and slutty Domique (Devon Aoki, sporting a respectable French accent), love-starved and not-too-bright underachiever Janet (Jill Ritchie) and their over-the-top bitchy leader Max (Meagan Good, trying too hard).

Continue reading: D.E.B.S. Review

Loser Review


Zero

What's the world coming to when Amy Heckerling -- writer-director of "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" and "Clueless," and the one true comedic visionary of teen cinema -- is responsible for the most mundane, most out-of-touch college romance of the year?

"Loser" -- the title says it all -- is a milksop love story about a mollycoddle hayseed (Jason Biggs, "American Pie") going off the school in the big city, falling meekly in love with a spunky, punky co-ed with raccoon eyeliner and low self-esteem (Mena Suvari, "American Beauty"), and becoming her pathetic puppy dog while she debases herself in an affair with a manipulative professor (Greg Kinnear).

He's a doormat without an iota of personality, but we're supposed to like him because he's earnest and feel sorry for him because his ruthlessly incisive, party dude roommates take advantage of his friendlessness and naiveté.

Continue reading: Loser Review

Jimmi Simpson

Jimmi Simpson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS