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L to R, Michael Emerson, Amy Acker, Sarah Shahi, Kevin Chapman and Jim Caviezel - The Paley Center for Media Presents Paleyfest Made in NY Person of Intrest 10 03 13 - NYC, NY, United States - Friday 4th October 2013

Michael Emerson, Amy Acker, Jim Caviezel, Sarah Shahi and Kevin Chapman
Michael Emerson
Michael Emerson
Michael Emerson and Amy Acker

The Cast, Person, Interest, L-R, Kevin Chapman, Taraji P. Henson, Michael Emerson and Jim Caviezel - The Cast of Person of Interest, L-R, Kevin Chapman, Taraji P. Henson, Michael Emerson, Jim Caviezel, Monday 24th September 2012 at the screening of 'Person of Interest' - Arrivals

The Cast, Person, Interest, L-r, Kevin Chapman, Taraji P. Henson, Michael Emerson and Jim Caviezel
Kevin Chapman
The Cast, Person, Interest, L-r, Kevin Chapman, Taraji P. Henson, Michael Emerson and Jim Caviezel
The Cast, Person, Interest, L-r, Jonathan Nolan, Kevin Chapman, Taraji P. Henson, Michael Emerson, Jim Caviezel and Greg Plageman
Kevin Chapman

Jim Caviezel - Actor Jim Caviezel Monday 13th August 2012 seen on the set of 'Person of Interest'

Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel

Jim Caviezel Wednesday 16th May 2012 2012 CBS Upfronts at The Tent at Lincoln Center

Jim Caviezel

Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson Tuesday 1st May 2012 Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson at The Grove for TV show EXTRA.

Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson
Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson
Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson

Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jim Caviezel Tuesday 6th March 2012 Chiwetel Ejiofor, Jim Caviezel and director Annette Haywood-Carter on the film set of 'Savannah', where Caviezel plays Ward Allen, a man of privilege who leaves behind his luxurious life to pursue that of a market hunter.

Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jim Caviezel
Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jim Caviezel
Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jim Caviezel
Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jim Caviezel

James Caviezel Friday 30th September 2011 filming on the set of the new TV show 'Person of Interest' at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn New York City, USA

James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel

James Caviezel Wednesday 18th May 2011 2011 CBS Upfront held at the Lincoln Center New York City, USA

James Caviezel

The Stoning Of Soraya M. Review


Very Good
Despite a slightly simplistic filmmaking style, this true story retains real force in its depiction of human cruelty in the name of religion. It's not easy to watch such horrific events, but it's so important that it cries out to be seen.

In 1986, French-Iranian journalist Freidoune Sahebjam (Caviezel) is driving through Iran when his car breaks down in an isolated village. Called "crazy" by the men, Zahra (Aghdashloo) corners him and recounts the brutal events of the preceding day. Defenceless in a society ruled by Sharia law, Zahra's niece Soraya (Marno) was the subject of a conspiracy led by her husband (Negahban), who wanted to marry a 14-year-old. To do this he had to gain the support of the local convict-turned-mullah (Pourtash) and the weak-willed mayor (Diaan).

Continue reading: The Stoning Of Soraya M. Review

Jim Caviezel Friday 16th April 2010 signs autographs as he leaves his hotel London, England

Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel
Jim Caviezel

James Caviezel Thursday 15th April 2010 outside the BBC Radio 1 studios London, England

James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel

Outlander Review


Bad
We are apparently in the midst of a minor Viking renaissance. In 2007, Marcus Nispel followed up his successful revamp of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with the little seen Pathfinder. Centering on an orphaned Norsemen, the Native Americans who raised him, and their battle against returning Scandinavian hordes, it was not a box office success. Heck, one imagines that most people reading this opening paragraph don't even know the movie existed. Now comes Outlander, a surreal sci-fi link up of Alien, Predator, Species, and Beowulf. When it stays in space, it works. When it hits the ancient lands of Odin however, it flops around like fetid smoked fish.

On his way back to his home planet on a funereal mission, extraterrestrial Kainan (James Caviezel) discovers a deadly alien beast known as a Moorwen onboard his ship. It causes the vessel to crash land in Norway circa the 7th century. After getting his bearings and sending a distress signal, Kainan begins to explore the area. He is soon trapped by warrior Wulfric (Jack Huston) and taken to the fortified stronghold of King Rothgar (John Hurt) and his wild, unwieldy daughter Freya (Sophia Myles).

Continue reading: Outlander Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Déjà Vu Review


Very Good
The last time I could use "smart" to describe a Tony Scott movie, a bath-robed Will Smith was dodging satellites and thwarting conspirators in the taut Enemy of the State. The ready-made blockbuster pushed the envelope of technological surveillance as it spun a textured man-on-the-run mystery. Having Smith, Gene Hackman, and Jon Voight on hand certainly helped.

Scott resumes his techno tricks for Déjà Vu, a police procedural with science-fiction tools that improves longstanding stakeout methods as an investigator works to solve a volatile crime.

Continue reading: Déjà Vu Review

I Am David Review


Bad
Despite some recognition by minor festivals and to the joy of overprotective mothers, this story of a boy who escapes from a Bulgarian labor camp in 1952 comes as a mostly juvenile effort from people who are into sanitizing reality. Mostly it's unreal, bloodless, and boring, but as a sentimental fable designed not to shock the little ones, it can be considered a safe distraction.

Pre-teen David (Ben Tibber) has grown up a prisoner of fascists running a camp whose purpose appears to be the breaking up of rocks. His sole friend is Johannes (Jim Caviezel), an adult who mentors him as a father figure. When Johannes is shot dead over a stolen bar of soap, David is given instructions on how to escape, where to go, the advice to "trust no one," and a bag of essentials including a compass, a pocket knife, a bar of soap, and a sealed envelope for delivery to whoever meets him at his destination in Denmark.

Continue reading: I Am David Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

Frequency Review


Extraordinary
The time travel/time bending genre always seems worn out. The very topic lends itself to the production of hacky movies like Millennium, and yet I am constantly surprised to see one film after another making good on the hidden promise of the genre. Witness the Back to the Future series and the powerful 12 Monkeys. As it turns out, mucking with time actually pays off more often than not!

Not only is Frequency a good flick, it's fully worthy of a place among one of the best timetwisters ever made.

Continue reading: Frequency Review

The Final Cut (2004) Review


OK
Is it possible for a film to have too many ideas? Anything's possible, of course, in the realm of science fiction. By exploring an unspecified futuristic society, writer/director Omar Naim raises disturbing sci-fi conundrums in the wildly original The Final Cut. Unfortunately, he leaves the bulk of his more pressing issues in the shadows and opts to clear the guilty conscience of the film's lone protagonist.

The anti-hero of Cut is the ironically-named Alan Hakman (Robin Williams), a cutter who specializes in manipulating the Zoe footage of society's shadiest characters. Say what? Let me explain. In the future, a parent can choose to pay for their newborn to receive a Zoe implant. The device records an individual's experiences from a first-person perspective. Everything goes to tape, from potentially humiliating private experiences to the major triumphs in a person's life.

Continue reading: The Final Cut (2004) Review

The Thin Red Line Review


Good
War is hell. I think.

Terrence Malick's long-awaited and severely overhyped Line is plenty red, but it isn't thin at all. In fact, it's damn thick and dense, and it meanders about like a lazy river.

Continue reading: The Thin Red Line Review

Angel Eyes Review


Weak
He's an emotionless, lost soul wandering the streets and helping out strangers while looking for a clean razor and dry cleaner for his dirty overcoat. She's a pissed-off and lonely police chick who sleeps with her bulletproof vest on and enjoys beating up suspects, drinking Budweiser, and despising her abusive father. Together, these two misfits meet through some psychic mumbo-jumbo, learn to face down their inner demons, discover that true love does exist in this cruel world, and blah blah blah.

Jennifer Lopez and James Caviezel trudge with heavy hearts through the muck of suspense/drama/romantic comedy/love story Angel Eyes -- a film with an identity crisis that rivals Plato from Rebel with a Cause.

Continue reading: Angel Eyes Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo Review

High Crimes Review


Bad
What confidence we have in our American justice system to expose an endless procession of corrupt government officials in stupid political thrillers. High Crimes is no different. It's another military drama where some unlikely guy is arrested and charged with military crimes. Everyone knows these movies inside, outside, front, and back, but Hollywood continues to spit them out, each time using a different gimmick.

Here, the gimmick is that the attorney of the accused is his wife. She's Claire Kubik, played by Ashley Judd. This actress perspires such engaging charisma, it's a shame to see her stuck in such tedious, enormously predictable material. So it's no surprise to find that Claire is married to Tom (James Caviezel), who, unbeknownst to his wife, is an ex-military man who has a few skeletons in his closet.

Continue reading: High Crimes Review

The Passion Of The Christ Review


Extraordinary
Detractors have spent months condemning Mel Gibson's labor of faith, The Passion of the Christ. Many protest its abundant gore and relentless violence. The loudest arguments rally against the film's reported anti-Semitic stance. Gibson tried to answer his critics, but his defensive statements only sprinkled more gasoline on the already raging flames of controversy.

Now that the film is out, it finally can speak for itself. And as it turns out, some of the arguments are valid. Passion, which arduously depicts the final hours of Jesus Christ, contains brutal scenes of torture that linger for an eternity. And Gibson does limit his narrative to Jesus' conviction and crucifixion, with occasional fleeting reminders of significant events such as the last supper or the Sermon on the Mount.

Continue reading: The Passion Of The Christ Review

Ride With The Devil Review


Excellent
Hands down, this is the best Civil War movie since Glory. Ride with the Devil is captivating from the opening scene and its eclectic cast is shockingly powerful. Don't worry about Jewel ruining anything; she convincingly makes the transition from pop star to actress, and Jeffrey Wright's (Basquiat, Celebrity) performance of a former slave fighting for the Confederacy is unprecedented and chillingly realistic. I have no clue what they were thinking with such a misleading title -- Ride with the Devil isn't some supernatural, special effects-laden, cheesy line-filled, end-of-the-millennium dud; it's a movie about a perspective of American history rarely talked about in classrooms across the country. The plot sympathizes with the ideals of the Confederate bushwhackers fighting a guerilla-style war against the Union Jay Hawks- and to its credit; it almost makes you believe in their cause.

Our protagonist is Jake Roedel, (Tobey Maguire -- The Ice Storm) a young Missouri-raised son of a poor Dutch immigrant, and he along with his child hood buddy Jack Bull Chiles, the son of a Missouri plantation owner, (Skeet Ulrich -- As Good As It Gets, Chill Factor) join up as bushwhackers when their homes and families are seized by Union soldiers. They both become skilled gunmen and execute daring raids on Union soldiers and sympathizers. By 1862, their unit, headed by Black John (James Caviezel), includes George Clyde (Simon Baker) and Clyde's loyal former slave Daniel Holt (Jeffrey Wright). With a harsh winter looming, the Bushwhackers must disperse and find shelter. Several members hole up in a hidden hillside dugout. While in hiding, their food and supplies are provided by the young widow Sue Lee (Jewel). When casualties are taken from a Jay Hawk surprise attack the group is splintered and Jake and Holt are united as soldiers in solidarity. As the war rages on, most of their remaining Bushwhacker compatriots are either dead or lost on the Southern cause, so Jake and Holt must decide whether to keep the fight alive or flee west.

Continue reading: Ride With The Devil Review

Madison Review


Terrible
Four years of dust, mold, and caked-on grime have collected around Madison, a sleep-inducing yarn produced way back in 2001. Why then is MGM picking this relic off the shelves for theatrical distribution? We'll never know.

Madison is based on a true story, though not a very good one, about an underdog Indiana-based power boat racing team led by Jim McCormick (James Caviezel), his impressionable son, Mike (Jake Lloyd), and their affable crew. In 1971, faced with overwhelming odds, the Madison squad raised $50,000 and hosted the sport's year-end Gold Cup event, a televised race that brought tremendous exposure and drive to their cash-strapped mill town.

Continue reading: Madison Review

Bobby Jones, Stroke Of Genius Review


Bad
If Jim Caviezel wanted his next project after The Passion of the Christ to be bland, uncontroversial, and utterly forgettable, he picked a winner in Bobby Jones, Stroke of Genius. The only people bothering Caviezel will be fanatical golfers desperate to find out how he duplicated Jones's classic swing.

Presented by the Bobby Jones Film Company and approved by his heirs, so you know it's brutally honest, Stroke of Genius details the first half of Jones's life, which is presented with as much narrative élan as a fifth grader's book report. A sickly boy, Bobby watches with rapt attention the matches on the golf course near his house. He spends hours practicing in the vast Georgia countryside, and as a teenager becomes a star amateur. Later, after years of struggling, he becomes the best golfer in the world.

Continue reading: Bobby Jones, Stroke Of Genius Review

Pay It Forward Review


Weak

At the helm of "Pay It Forward," director Mimi Leder becomes such a manipulatively mawkish emotional puppeteer that it feels as if she's tossing tear gas grenades into the audience.

Adapted from Catherine Ryan Hyde's novel about emotional and physical scars, symbolic martyrdom and saving the world with deliberate acts of compassion, it's a story that would be difficult to tell without pulling a few heartstring. But ye-owch! Does she have to yank so hard?

The peerless Kevin Spacey stars as Eugene Simonet, a bottled-up, austere junior high social studies teacher with burn scars over much of his body and face. He opens every school year by offering extra credit to any student who can "think of an idea to change our world and put it into action."

Continue reading: Pay It Forward Review

Angel Eyes Review


Good

"Angel Eyes" is not the cheaply manipulative woman-in-peril thriller it appears to be in its TV ads and trailers. But one can hardly blame Warner Bros. for marketing the film that way because it would be hard to sell, in 30-second spots on MTV, an emotionally layered, grown-up drama about two battered souls finding a blossoming but tentative solace together.

A fulfilling surprise from start to finish, the film stars Jennifer Lopez in her best performance since "Out of Sight" as Sharon Pogue, a tough Chicago beat cop who keeps a man alive until paramedics arrive after a horrible traffic accident in the opening scene.

All in the line of duty, she's forgotten about it a year later when a quiet, eerie stranger saves her life by coming out of the blue to tackle a street thug who ambushed her during a foot chase and was about to blow her head off.

Continue reading: Angel Eyes Review

High Crimes Review


Weak

Few things are more frustrating to a film buff than seeing an otherwise good movie marred beyond redemption by a disastrous ending.

While I would never reveal what happens in the last act of the sometimes contrived military courtroom drama "High Crimes," I will say it throws five and a half reels of good acting and directing out the window for a cheap shock-thriller finale that 1) requires off-the-scale suspension of disbelief and 2) casts doubt on the validity of the entire plot.

In the first hour and 45 minutes Ashley Judd gives one of her strongest performances (in an idealized role) as a aggressive (but, of course, playfully feminine) defense attorney who abandons her promising career at a San Francisco law firm (she was, of course, about to make partner) to defend her adoring husband (Jim Caviezel) when he's arrested out of the blue and put on trial in a secret military tribunal.

Continue reading: High Crimes Review

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Jim Caviezel Movies

Escape Plan Movie Review

Escape Plan Movie Review

You know not to expect something deep and meaningful when a movie stars Stallone and...

Escape Plan Trailer

Escape Plan Trailer

Ray Breslin is an expert in structural-security and has been able to break out of...

Transit Movie Review

Transit Movie Review

Infused with a B-movie vibe, this fast-paced, choppily edited thriller doesn't waste any time on...

The Stoning of Soraya M. Movie Review

The Stoning of Soraya M. Movie Review

Despite a slightly simplistic filmmaking style, this true story retains real force in its depiction...

Outlander Trailer

Outlander Trailer

Watch the trailer for OutlanderSet in 709 AD, Outlander is the story of a 2...

Outlander Movie Review

Outlander Movie Review

We are apparently in the midst of a minor Viking renaissance. In 2007, Marcus Nispel...

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Déjà Vu Movie Review

Déjà Vu Movie Review

The last time I could use "smart" to describe a Tony Scott movie, a bath-robed...

I Am David Movie Review

I Am David Movie Review

Despite some recognition by minor festivals and to the joy of overprotective mothers, this story...

The Count of Monte Cristo (2002) Movie Review

The Count of Monte Cristo (2002) Movie Review

The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed...

Frequency Movie Review

Frequency Movie Review

The time travel/time bending genre always seems worn out. The very topic lends itself...

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The Final Cut (2004) Movie Review

The Final Cut (2004) Movie Review

Is it possible for a film to have too many ideas? Anything's possible, of course,...

The Thin Red Line Movie Review

The Thin Red Line Movie Review

War is hell. I think.Terrence Malick's long-awaited and severely overhyped Line is plenty red,...

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