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Jim Broadbent Loves His Flawed Character In The Sense Of An Ending


Jim Broadbent

To play the lead role in the film adaptation of Booker Prize-winning novel The Sense of an Ending, Jim Broadbent says that going back to Julian Barnes' writing was the key. "Just how someone speaks reveals so much about them," Broadbent says of his character, Tony. "Hearing that voice is the most useful thing you can get."

Jim Broadbent in The Sense Of An EndingJim Broadbent in The Sense Of An Ending

Broadbent says that the role resonated in his own past, especially his school days. "I wasn't quite one of those smart, intellectual sixth-formers," he laughs, "but those schoolboy relationships are fairly consistent over the generations, and I certainly recognise him from my own. I also recognise the arrogance and awkwardness of youth. So the arc of his life from school until now, I knew exactly where he was coming from."

Continue reading: Jim Broadbent Loves His Flawed Character In The Sense Of An Ending

The Sense Of An Ending Review

Very Good

Julian Barnes' Booker Prize-winning novel is adapted into a remarkably intelligent, gently involving film anchored by a terrific performance from Jim Broadbent. With an unusually realistic depiction of London life, this an introspective story about finding closure, and it's nice that the filmmakers avoid ramping up the narrative to push a big emotional climax. Instead, it's in the small moments that the film rings true.

Broadbent plays Tony, a pensioner who runs a small camera shop as a hobby. His primary distraction is his single daughter Susie (Michelle Dockery), who is in the final stages of pregnancy. So Tony and his ex-wife Margaret (Harriet Walter) are providing whatever support they can. Then out of the blue he is notified of an inheritance from someone in his distant past. This sends him down memory lane, as he remembers his life as a university student (then Billy Howle), falling in love with Veronica (Freya Mavor) and feeling crushed when she fell for his best friend Adrian (Joe Alwyn) instead. So Tony tracks down Veronica (now Charlotte Rampling) in the present day to try to sort out their loose ends.

This is a complex story about how tricky it is to make sense of a messy past. The film refuses to simplify things in any way, leaving the audience to see themselves in the characters and situations as it flickers back and forth between the two timelines, dropping hints and details until the final piece falls into the puzzle. And the message is that you can't get closure until you accept even the more difficult elements of your story.

Continue reading: The Sense Of An Ending Review

Jim Broadbent Says The Sense Of An Ending Is About Complexity, Not Age


Jim Broadbent

At 67 Jim Broadbent is also one of the few actors who plays his age on-screen. In the British drama The Sense of an Ending, he plays a retired man looking back at his life, pondering his regrets through the eyes of his ex-wife and an old flame (played by Harriet Walter and Charlotte Rampling, respectively).

Charlotte Rampling and Jim Broadbent in The Sense Of An Ending

Broadbent says that the character was easy to identify with. "He's actually not really grown up," he says. "A lot of us older people like to think we're mature and grown-up and know what we're about. But we're still anxious and vulnerable and as arrogant and flawed as when we were at 20. We just get better at disguising it, at editing our life and behaving, supposedly, properly. I'm constantly astonished that I'm 67 years old and approaching 70. I think I'm just starting to think maybe somewhere down the line I'll get the hang of things. You never feel you've gotten there, that you've achieved any sort of wisdom."

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Jim Broadbent Reveals Details About His 'Game Of Thrones' Season 7 Character


Jim Broadbent

Veteran British actor Jim Broadbent has teased a few details about the “significant” character he will portray in the upcoming seventh season of ‘Game of Thrones’ – and it turns out that a great deal of the fan speculation was correct!

Despite the HBO hit show’s producers wishing to keep almost everything about season seven under wraps ahead of its arrival later this year, Broadbent spilled a few crucial details for ‘GoT’ fans in a new interview with entertainment site Screencrush.

Jim BroadbentJim Broadbent talked about his 'Game of Thrones' character

Continue reading: Jim Broadbent Reveals Details About His 'Game Of Thrones' Season 7 Character

The Sense Of An Ending Trailer


Tony Webster is a retired man in his sixties whose past comes back to haunt him when he receives a strange letter in the post. It takes him back to his university days when he met the love of his life Veronica Ford. Though they have been estranged since then, she bequeaths him a diary in her will. Their separation was one of bitterness and heartbreak; his best friend Adrian Finn ended up stealing Veronica's heart, and Tony reacted by sending them a very angry letter in response to their partnership. Not long after, Adrian died in mysterious circumstances and with all the horror of those years brought up once again, Tony is forced to confront his guilt and innoncence in the whole saga - as well as other people's suspicions.

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Bridget Jones's Baby Review

Excellent

As it's been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie, expectations aren't too high for this sequel. So it's a very nice surprise that this film stands on its own as a charming and often very funny romantic comedy while rounding off the trilogy in style. The cast is terrific, and the script bristles with snappy dialogue and witty characters that lead the audience down an unpredictable route to a complicated happy ending.

On her 43rd birthday, Bridget (Renee Zellweger) is finally content with her single life. Although her romantic past continues to torment her, especially when she runs into former flame Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) at a funeral. With a corporate shake-up underway at the TV news programme she produces, presenter Miranda (Sara Solemani) suggests that Bridget needs some sex to liven up her life, whisking her off to a music festival. There she has a cute, hot encounter with the dishy Jack (Patrick Dempsey). And a week later, she rekindles her romance with Mark when she learns that his marriage has ended. So when she discovers that she's pregnant, Bridget hasn't a clue which man is the father.

This premise offers plenty of scope for both thematic meaning and awkward plot turns, and the screenplay merrily dives right into all of it, mixing some silly slapstick with darker emotions as director Sharon Maguire maintains a breezy-comical tone. This kind of balance is difficult to get right, but the film feels effortlessly engaging.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones's Baby Review

Jim Broadbent Joins Cast Of 'Game Of Thrones' For Season 7


Jim Broadbent HBO

Veteran British actor Jim Broadbent has joined the cast of ‘Game of Thrones’ for its seventh series, in what is described as a “significant” role.

The 67 year old actor, renowned for dozens of award-winning roles in movies, on television and the stage, is to play a major part in the seventh and penultimate series of HBO’s ever-popular fantasy drama when it returns in the summer of 2017, according to Entertainment Weekly.

Jim BroadbentJim Broadbent is to play a "significant" role in 'Game of Thrones' series 7

Continue reading: Jim Broadbent Joins Cast Of 'Game Of Thrones' For Season 7

Bridget Jones's Baby Trailer


Bridget has always known how to get herself into a muddle - catastrophic muddles at that - even though she's been separated from her last love, Mark, for five years it appears their journey together hasn't come to an end as yet. 

After taking advice from one of her colleagues, Bridget decides that it's time to get back on the dating scene and after deciding that the likes of Tinder aren't for her, Bridget finds herself being set up with Jack Qwant who she sees in the news room studio. 

The pair get on remarkably well and soon find themselves spending the night together. A little fun is just what Bridget needed. When she finds herself at the christening of one of her friends little girls, her and Mark are forced to be amicable towards one another but the pair fall into old habits and Bridget and he also spend the night together. 

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Jim Broadbent - Photographs of a variety of stars as they took to the red carpet for the world premiere of 'Paddington' which was held at the Odeon cinema in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 23rd November 2014

Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent - The Arqiva British Academy Television Awards 2014 (BAFTA) - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 18th May 2014

Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent - Arqiva British Academy Television Awards held at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 18th May 2014

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent - 'The Harry Hill Movie' World Premiere at the Vue Cinema, Leicester Square, London - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 19th December 2013

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent - The World Premiere of 'Harry Hill The Movie' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 19th December 2013

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent - Moet British Independent Film Awards held at Old Billingsgate Market - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th December 2013

Jim Broadbent

Le Week-end Review


Extraordinary

Like a 20-years-later sequel to Before Midnight, this sharply observant comedy-drama follows a couple through a soul-searching weekend in which they evaluate their relationship with real wit and emotion. And transparent performances make it something to savour, as it offers us a rare grown-up movie about real issues we can identify with.

As the title suggests, the weekend in question takes place in France, and it's a 30th anniversary treat for Nick and Meg (Broadbent and Duncan). They can't really afford a trip to Paris, especially after ditching their dodgy pre-booked hotel in lieu of something far nicer, but they figure out ways to make their time special. Meanwhile, they talk about their years together, and the hopes and regrets that are haunting their thoughts. There are some hard questions to ask about their future, even as they haven't lost that spark of sexuality. Then they run into Nick's old Cambridge pal Morgan (Goldblum), who invites them to a party where they meet academics and artists just like them. Which only makes them think even more.

The key issues for them include Nick's early retirement (for an ill-timed comment to a student) and Meg's desire to change her life completely. As they consider the options, their conversations drive the film forward forcefully, flowing through cycles of flirtation and laughter to bitterness and cruelty. The depth of their love is never in doubt, even as they wonder how secure their relationship actually is. Broadbent and Duncan play these scenes effortlessly, taking our breath away because it's all so honest, often both funny and scary at the same time.

Continue reading: Le Week-end Review

Filth Review


Essential

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts a new filmmaker on the map. Not only is this a loud blast of both style and substance, but it refuses to water down its subject matter, taking us through a shockingly profane story in a way that's both visually inventive and emotionally resonant.

This is the story of Bruce (McAvoy), an Edinburgh detective who's determined to beat his colleagues to a promotion. He's also a relentless womaniser, sexist, racist and drug addict. And he'll do anything to get ahead, hiding the sordid details of his private life from his boss (Sessions) while undermining the other cops at any chance while pretending to be their friends. In quick succession, he gets young Ray (Bell) addicted to cocaine, flirts continually with Amanda (Poots), has a fling with the kinky wife (Dickie) of fellow officer Gus (Lewis), torments Peter (Elliott) about his sexuality, and takes Bladesey (Marsan) on a sex-tourism holiday while making obscene calls to his needy wife (Henderson). All of this happens while Bruce leads the investigation into a grisly murder.

McAvoy dives so far into this role that we barely recognise him in there. Bruce is so amoral that we are taken aback by each degrading moment. And yet McAvoy somehow manages to hold our sympathy due to the film's blackly hilarious tone and a startling undercurrent of real emotion. Even though he's a monster, we see his boyish fragility, especially in surreal sequences involving his therapist (Broadbent), which merge with his fantasies, hallucinations and nightmares. 

Continue reading: Filth Review

Colin Firth Will Put On His Wellies & Raincoat As He Lends His Voice To Paddington Bear


Colin Firth Hugh Bonneville Julie Walters Jim Broadbent Nicole Kidman

Colin Firth has agreed to play Paddington Bear in a re-boot of the famed Michael Bond books about a bear from Peru with a taste for marmalade. In the original Bond books, Paddington is found by the Brown family in London's Paddington Station after getting lost on the way over from his South American homeland. It is thought that the origins from the book will be mirrored on to the screen.

Colin Firth
Colin Firth will play the marmalade-loving bear

In a discussion with the Daily Mail, Firth revealed that the movie will all be live action, except for the computer animated Paddington. Firth also revealed that as well as providing the voice for Paddington, his facial expressions will be mapped and used by the animators to construct the Paddington we see on stage, using the same methods used to capture Gollum in the Lord of the Rings films.

Continue reading: Colin Firth Will Put On His Wellies & Raincoat As He Lends His Voice To Paddington Bear

With Bana And Hall, How Did 'Closed Circuit' Fail To Please?


Eric Bana Rebecca Hall Jim Broadbent John Crowley

Closed Circuit, the new crime-thriller from Is Anybody There? director John Crowley, has failed to impress the critics ahead of its highly anticipated release this week. The international suspense thriller features a glittering cast including Eric Bana, the superb Rebecca Hall and Jim Broadbent, though was criticized for its pacing and urgency.

The movie focuses on a high-profile terrorism case that unexpectantly binds together two ex-lovers on the defense team. One morning, a busy London market is hit by an bombing, though only one member of the accused survives and is arrested and jailed.

Preparations begin for one of the trials of the century, though here's the hitch: the government will use classified information to prosecute the man - evidence so secret that neither he nor his lawyers can see it. When the accused's lawyer dies expectantly, a feisty young replacement (Bana) steps up to the plate and begins to untangle a web of conspiracy, which all sounds great, but the critics can take or leave it.

Continue reading: With Bana And Hall, How Did 'Closed Circuit' Fail To Please?

Harry Hill And Julie Walters Race Scooters For 'The Harry Hill Movie' [Pictures]


Harry Hill Julie Walters Jim Broadbent Matt Lucas Sheridan Smith

Forget The Fast & The Furious! This week, comedian Harry Hill and British movie legend Julie Walters took to their scooters and powered through a quiet London suburb to film scenes from Hill's new movie Harry Hill The Movie. In a pretty hilarious looking scene, the comedian drives a yellow mobility scooter in typically slapstick fashion, falling off it at one point as Walters - who plays his grandmother - cackles away.

Iconic actress Walters was almost unrecognizable in a white frizzy wig, dark sunglasses and purple jacket while Hill was dressed as, well, Harry Hill. The comedian opted for his signature suit with big collared shirt and creeper shoes. The movie follows Harry and his grandmother as they attempt to get his pet hamster from London to a vet in Blackpool before the clock winds down. It's seems a pretty silly premise, though Harry has assembled quite for the cast for the movie, including revered actor Jim Broadbent, comedian Matt Lucas and recent Olivier award winner Sheridan Smith.

Directed by Steve Bendelack and co-written by Harry, Jon Forster and James Lamont, the movie is due to hit cinemas later in the year.

Continue reading: Harry Hill And Julie Walters Race Scooters For 'The Harry Hill Movie' [Pictures]

James McAvoy Needs To Clean Up His Act In Filth (Trailer)


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh Jamie Bell Imogen Poots Jim Broadbent

Filth, the latest movie to star James McAvoy, is an adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel of the same name and it has all the hallmarks of a classic Irvine Welsh movie adaptation, with its fast-paced, seedy cinematography and wry, snappy humour. The word filth takes on two meanings here. McAvoy plays the central character Bruce Robertson, who – by all accounts, is a pretty filthy kinda guy, he’s into some fairly unsavoury sexual practises and when his doctor asks if he’s been taking his medication, he’s only able to sort-of-honestly answer ‘yes’ because of all the illicit substances he’s been snorting. That’s not the only kind of ‘filth’ he is though – he’s also a police officer. A Detective Sergeant no less.

Robertson’s not one for abiding by the law, however and even when he’s on duty, he’s a pretty deceitful, dishonest kind of guy and will do anything to get one over on his colleagues, so that he can get a promotion. However, the combination of mind-altering drugs and the fact that he’s collapsing under a mountain of lies soon starts to take a toll on his sanity and wellbeing. Add to that the fact that he has a troubled marriage that he’s desperate to save and things aren’t looking great for him, all told.

This red-band trailer precedes the September release of the movie which also stars Jamie Bell, Imogen Poots, Joanne Froggett and Jim Broadbent

Continue reading: James McAvoy Needs To Clean Up His Act In Filth (Trailer)

Filth - Red Band Trailer


This trailer is only suitable for persons aged 18 or over.

Bruce Robertson is a vile, devious and emotionally disturbed individual who also happens to be a Detective Sergeant. Off duty, he lives a life of debauchery; snorting line after line of cocaine and indulging in sordid sexual encounters with numerous women while trying to control his unpredictable bipolar personality. On duty, he does everything within his power to trick, deceive and ruin the lives of his colleagues with whom he competes to achieve a promotion to detective inspector. He does nothing to hide his radical views on race and women as he attempts to solve a grisly murder that seems to have more to it than he initially thought. With the web of lies he weaves throughout his life, will he be able to sort out truths from the untruths in order to maintain his sanity as his deteriorating mental health threatens to cripple him? And will he ever be reunited with the wife he is so desperate to resolve things with?

Adapted from the novel by Irvine Welsh, 'Filth' has been directed and written by Jon S. Baird ('Cass') and sees an intense star-studded cast convert to screen an compelling story of insanity, romance and deceit. This shocking 18-rated crime drama is set to hit UK cinemas in September 2013.

Jim Broadbent - South Bank Sky Arts Awards held at the Dorchester - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 12th March 2013

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Cloud Atlas Review


Excellent

Mad geniuses Tom Tykwer (Perfume) and the Wachowski siblings (The Matrix) boldly take on David Mitchell's layered epic novel, which connects six generations through the power of storytelling. The film takes so many huge risks that it's breathtaking to watch even when it stumbles. And as each tale is passed on to the next generation, the swirling themes get under the skin.

The six stories are interlinked in a variety of ways, transcending time to find common themes. On a ship in 1849, a seriously ill American lawyer (Sturgess) shows kindness to a stowaway ex-slave (Gyasi). In 1936 Edinburgh, a great composer (Broadbent) hires a musician (Whishaw) to transcribe his work, then tries to steal the young man's magnificent Cloud Atlas symphony. In 1973 San Francisco, a Latina journalist (Berry) gets a tip about dodgy goings on in a local nuclear power plant. In present-day London, a publisher (Broadbent) is trapped in a nursing home by his brother (Grant) and plots a daring escape. In 2144 Neo Soul, an official (D'Arcy) interrogates a replicant (Bae) who started a rebellion alongside a notorious rebel (Sturgess). And in a distant stone-age future, an island goatherd (Hanks) teams up with an off-worlder (Berry) when they're attacked by a warlord (Grant).

While the themes in this film are eerily involving, what makes this film unmissable is the way the entire cast turns up in each of the six story strands, changing age, race and gender along the way. Even so, they're essential variations on each other. Weaving is always a nemesis, whether he's a hitman, a demon or a nasty nurse. Hanks' characters are always strong-willed and often badly misguided. Grant goes against type to play sinister baddies. And D'Arcy is the only actor who plays the same character in two segments, as Whishaw's 1930s young lover and Berry's 1970s elderly informant. Meanwhile, each segment plays with a different genre: seafaring epic, twisted drama, political mystery, action comedy, sci-fi thriller and gritty adventure.

Continue reading: Cloud Atlas Review

Jim Broadbent - UK film premiere of 'Cloud Atlas' held at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 18th February 2013

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent and Tim McInnerny - Great Expectations Gala Party London United Kingdom Thursday 7th February 2013

Jim Broadbent and Tim Mcinnerny
Jim Broadbent and Tim Mcinnerny
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent Wednesday 24th October 2012 "Cloud Atlas" Los Angeles Premiere held at Grauman's Chinese Theater - Arrivals

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Wednesday 24th October 2012 Premiere of 'Cloud Atlas' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Jim Broadbent and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Jim Broadbent and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Cloud Atlas Is As Risky As Inception, Says Tom Hanks


Tom Hanks Christopher Nolan Lilly Wachowski Halle Berry Jim Broadbent Jim Sturgess Doona Bae Zhou Xun Hugh Grant Hugo Weaving Susan Sarandon

With his upcoming film, Cloud Atlas ready for release later this month, one of the film’s stars, Tom Hanks, has alluded to the deep plotline that runs through the book adaptation and said that the film is as “risky as Inception” was when it was release in 2010.

Hanks was plugging his new film during a chat with Canadian paper The Montreal Gazette, when he brought up the Christopher Nolan film, suggesting that it was the closest thing to compare to his latest movie outing. Cloud Atlas follows the intertwining lives of a massive cast that drifts between centuries both past and present, examining the impact of fate on good and bad behaviour.

In his discussion, he not only had praises to sing for Brit-director Nolan, but also his three “bold” directors for the upcoming project; Tom Tykwer and Lana and Andy Wachowski. And if three directors were a lot to take on board, then the number of characters the actors have to transform themselves into throughout the film will take some effort to get your heads round too, with Hanks alone taking on 6 different roles.

Continue reading: Cloud Atlas Is As Risky As Inception, Says Tom Hanks

Jim Broadbent Saturday 8th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Cloud Atlas' - Afterparty

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Cloud Atlas Trailer


'Cloud Atlas' is the story of how the separate lives of individuals and their actions affect each other through time. It explores a variety of different themes making it difficult to be pigeon-holed into a particular genre; action, romance and drama create the twists and turns that can change a human being from being a violent killer to being a compassionate hero. This tale explores how one act of basic humanity can influence a revolution centuries into the future.

Continue: Cloud Atlas Trailer

Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent - Elliot Gould, Guest, Jim Broadbent, Chris Fujiwara Wednesday 20th June 2012 Edinburgh Film Festival 2012 - 'Killer Joe' Premiere

Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent
Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent
Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent
Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent
Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent
Elliot Gould and Jim Broadbent

Jim Broadbent and BAFTA Sunday 12th February 2012 The Orange British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals.

Jim Broadbent and Bafta

Jim Broadbent Wednesday 4th January 2012 'The Iron Lady' UK film premiere held at the BFI Southbank - Arrivals London, England

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent

Arthur Christmas Review


Very Good

This lively holiday romp has a steady stream of sharp verbal and visual gags that hold our interest. Even when the plot stalls in the middle, it's difficult to stop chuckling at the filmmakers' deranged sense of humour.

At the North Pole, Santa (Broadbent) is a bit complacent after 70 years on the job, letting his heir-apparent son Steve (Laurie) convert Christmas Eve into a high-tech black-ops style mission executed with military precision. To Steve, missing one child is an insignificant statistic. But Steve's younger brother Arthur (McAvoy) disagrees, and teams up with his feisty Grandsanta (Nighy) to make sure the last gift is delivered the old fashioned way.

Yes, the film is a riot of clashes between tradition and progress, the wisdom of the years and youthful vigour. Fortunately, the serious themes are subverted, hilariously playing with our expectations and never turning into a nostalgic paean to the olden days. That said, this British production does feel eerily co-opted by Hollywood, from the use of the American "Santa Claus" (no one ever calls him "Father Christmas", which might have made sense of the film's odd title) to the somewhat feeble attempts to ramp up the action and suspense. Not to mention a massive wave of sentimentality at the end.

But even this is undermined by Baynham (Borat) and director Smith's script, which maintains a dry British sense of humour and gives the strong vocal cast plenty of snappy material to play with. While most of the characters are a bit unmemorable, Nighy gets the best lines: Grandsanta as an old coot full of surprises, including some terrific rude jokes and an amusingly animated hound-style old reindeer sidekick. Staunton also has some terrific dialog as the underestimated Mrs Santa.

Visually the film is brightly colourful, amusingly designed with small sight gags and continual Christmas imagery. While the characters look a little plasticky, the settings are gorgeously rendered, and the flying sleigh sequences almost make it worth seeing in 3D. The problem is that the film feels stretched out by random antics and underdeveloped plot-threads along the way that add nothing to the overall story. So we get tired of the bumbling chaos, mainly because we know exactly where it's got to end up.

The Iron Lady Trailer


When Margaret Thatcher started out in politics she always aspired to do something great, though just how far she'd take her career was beyond imagination. Having first made her mark in local politics in 1959, Margaret was named MP for the first time.

Continue: The Iron Lady Trailer

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer


Harry Potter and his friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, continue their search for Voldemort's Horcruxes - dark magical objects that help the user gain immortality. Having found and destroyed one Horcrux - a locket belonging to Hogwarts founder Salazar Slytherin - the three friends travel from Ron's older brother Bill Weasley's house by the sea to the wizarding bank, Gringotts and then to Hogwarts to look for the final remaining Horcruxes.

Continue: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer

Perrier's Bounty Review


Good
Lively and rude, this comical crime thriller keeps us engaged with its likeable characters even when the plot begins to feel pointless. In the end, there's not much to the film, but it's enjoyable while it lasts.

Michael (Murphy) is a slacker who has four hours to pay back his loan shark Perrier (Gleeson) before a bounty is put out on him. On this fateful day, he teams up with his dying father Jim (Broadbent) and his neighbour Brenda (Whittaker), who accidentally gets involved in his mess. As they run around Dublin trying to stay one step ahead of the goons, as well as a couple of zealous traffic wardens, this trio is forced to examine their lives and relationships, often in the face of imminent injury.

Continue reading: Perrier's Bounty Review

Hot Fuzz Review


Excellent
For those who appreciated some gore alongside laughter in a movie, and were sick of seeing the slashers of the 1980s being constantly regurgitated for box office dollars, 2004's Shaun of the Dead was a refreshing cinematic experience. It wasn't perfect -- logic would randomly suspend itself and re-start again at the whim of plot, but the characters were fun to watch and listen to so it was difficult to hold these minor foibles against the film.

The filmmakers have returned, and corrected many of their mistakes. Hot Fuzz is not only hilariously funny, but every intelligent detail makes sense this time around, and the action is that much more engaging for what takes place because of it.

Continue reading: Hot Fuzz Review

Brazil Review


Essential
Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) is a civil servant Dilbert at the Ministry of Information. He's a low level office grunt typing his way through a lifetime of meaningless papers in a retro-future totalitarian state. His one escape from his dreary life is his dreams. Bursting with vivid colors, Sam's visions see him with armored wings rising into the bright sky above the cold city. There, in the firmament, Sam battles with Darkness to free a blonde beauty (Kim Greist) imprisoned in a floating cage.

Unfortunately, there are no happy endings for dreamers in this alternate world. Sam always awakens to his mind-numbing existence, only plugging away in a system that rewards only blandness, appeasing his socialite mother (addicted to face lifts) whose only wish is to see her meek son move his way up a corporate ladder to nowhere.

Continue reading: Brazil Review

Robots Review


Extraordinary
The 1995 release of Pixar's Toy Story forever altered the world of animated cinema. In an instant, decades of Disney-dominated traditional cartoons vanished in a pixilated puff of fairy dust and a new era of almost entirely computer-generated animation began. The ensuing wave of digital films has met with such astonishing box-office success that even such forgettable romps as Chris Wedge's Ice Age have managed to top the earnings charts in their opening weeks.

But things are changing in the animation scene. The freshness of CG has worn away, and audiences are no longer wowed by flashy technology alone. Disney/Pixar's The Incredibles has raised the bar on both animation excellence and story-telling savvy to a level that will be hard to top in coming years. If such early hits as Toy Story or Antz premiered today, it's unlikely they would wow the crowds nearly as much as they did on their initial releases. It's a tough time to be an animated film.

Continue reading: Robots Review

Little Voice Review


Excellent
Surprisingly powerful despite its cute premise, Horrocks shines as a timid young woman (known as Little Voice) who has the uncanny ability to unerringly reproduce the voice of dozens of great female vocalists (eg. Garland, Bassey, even Marilyn Monroe). Smarmy promoter Caine puts her onstage, where her neurosis only worsens, but not before a few sparkling hours before the crowds.

Continue reading: Little Voice Review

Moulin Rouge Review


Extraordinary
When a red curtain opens and an orchestra conductor emerges to "direct" the unmistakable 20th Century Fox theme music, we know we're in for something different. Really different. Good different.

Filled with virtuoso special effects and spectacular song-and-dance sequences, Baz Luhrmann's long-awaited Moulin Rouge makes every minute of our collectively held breath worthwhile. In fact, during its opening hour, this critic found it hard to look away even for a second to jot down a note, for fear of missing even a nuanced sparkle in the eye of some French whore.

Continue reading: Moulin Rouge Review

Iris Review


Excellent
In the refined and sobering drama Iris, we witness a loving but unconventional relationship between a strangely elegant couple -- English critic John Bayley and his Alzheimer's-stricken, novelist wife Iris Murdoch. Writer-director Richard Eyre, who wrote the script with Charles Wood based on Bayley's memoirs Iris: A Memoir and Elegy for Iris, delivers an amazingly touching portrait of resilient and everlasting passion between two eccentric creative forces who have contributed to the literary world immensely. Iris is an enchanting and finely-acted personal drama that manages to absorb the pleasures and pain of an undying spirit of togetherness. Expressionistic and resoundingly involving, Eyre's thought-provoking film is perceptively engaging.

Eyre does a terrific job in showing us the deterioration of a brilliant-minded woman in Iris Murdoch. It is always frustrating to witness anybody's decline in health, but it must be particularly awful for a talented author with an impeccable series of written work to her name. The film shows us the two phases of Iris's life -- as a free-spirited young woman in 1950's Oxford, England and as an aged, sickly soul trying to survive her last days in the 1990s while her husband tends to her needs. Titanic heroine Kate Winslet plays the youngish and energetic Iris while Oscar-winning actress Judi Dench portrays her ailing years.

Continue reading: Iris Review

Around The World In 80 Days (2004) Review


Terrible
The 50-year-old Jackie Chan has lost a step or two. This remake of the award winning 1956 classic Around the World in 80 Days is clearly just a vehicle to further his career; unfortunately it mainly showcases his age. His fight scenes are laughably choreographed and his acting comes across as forced.

Chan's problems are indicative of many others faced by this overblown $110 million mess. Even as production was finishing, a distributor had not been found. Not surprisingly, Disney eventually picked up the film. Yet, what is surprising is Disney's decision not to distribute a challenging film like Fahrenheit 9/11, but instead to release this one, a flavorless and disgraceful remake.

Continue reading: Around The World In 80 Days (2004) Review

Around The World In 80 Days Review


OK

Jules Verne might have a hard time recognizing his source material in the Jackie Chan action-comedy adaptation of "Around the World in 80 Days," but for non-purists, it's easy to forgive the many liberties taken in this funny, fleet-footed summer-matinee romp.

Although the ostensible main character is still screwball Victorian inventor Phileas Fogg (lanky Steve Coogan) -- who wagers against the stuffed shirts of the English scientific establishment that he can circumnavigate the globe in the titular time period -- this version of the story more literally revolves around Passepartout (Chan), Fogg's valet who has his own reasons for traipsing across continents.

Passepartout has stolen a jade Buddha from a Bank of London vault in order to return it to its rightful place: his native village in China. Fogg is his ticket to safe passage -- or so he thinks.

Continue reading: Around The World In 80 Days Review

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