Jill Hennessy

Jill Hennessy

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2015 AAFA American Image Awards

Cynthia Rowley and Jill Hennessy - A variety of stars were snapped on the red carpet as they arrived for the 37th Annual American Apparel and Footwear Association American Image Awards in New York City, United States - Monday 27th April 2015

Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy and Juanita D. Duggan

Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen'

Jill Hennessy - Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen' at The Barclay's Center in Brooklyn - Arrivals at Barclays Center, Disney - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th November 2014

Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy

The 3rd Mario Batali Foundation Honors Dinner

A variety of celebs were snapped as they arrived at the 3rd Mario Batali Foundation Honors Dinner which was held at Del Posto Restaurant in New York City

Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy and Paolo Mastropietro

2014 Tennis U.S. Open

Jill Hennessy and Paolo Mastropietro - 2014 Tennis U.S. Open - Men's Final - Celebrity Sightings - Flushing Meadows, New York, United States - Monday 8th September 2014

Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy

2014 Tennis U.S. Open - Men's Final - Celebrity Sightings

Jill Hennessy and husband Paolo Mastropieto - Celebrities and Players at the Men's Final of the 2014 U.S. Open. Marin Cilic of Croatia won the U.S. Open men's Tennis championship. Cilic won a Grand Slam title for the first time in his career, defeating Kei Nishikori of Japan in straight sets in Flushing Meadows, New York, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 8th September 2014

Lymelife Review


OK
Offbeat and funny but thoroughly realistic, this period drama explores issues of family, youth and social pressure through the eyes of a 15-year-old who's just starting to realise that people perhaps are more complicated than he ever imagined.

Scott (Rory Culkin) is a teen in 1980 Long Island, where his parents (Baldwin and Hennessy) are planning to build a new house while his meathead big brother (Keiran Culkin) is just back from basic training. He has a crush on his neighbour Adriana (Roberts), whose mother (Nixon) is failing to cope with the fact that her husband (Hutton) has Lyme disease. Both families are struggling with social mobility, marital stress and the tensions of the time they live in.

Not to mention some very bad decisions they make.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

Lymelife Review


Excellent
In Lymelife, Cynthia Nixon, as real estate agent Melissa Bragg in a New York suburb in 1979, looks skinny and a shade skanky, like an aging out-of-town version of a T. Rex groupie. And yet here she is in the real estate office trying to sell parcels in a housing development to people with from other countries. "It's the American Dream, Mr. Patel. On Long Island." Her boss, Mickey Bartlett (Alec Baldwin, he of the reptilian gaze and surface-to-air anger), is planning to become a millionaire in one year developing new homes in a place he calls Bartletown (what else?). And since they are next-door neighbors, the two are not so secretly engaged in schtupping one another. Mickey's wife Brenda (Jill Hennessy) is trying to tune him out but the song is getting monotonous. Melissa's husband Charlie (Timothy Hutton), spends his time in cheap gray bargain suits, sweating profusely and lurking in the basement, imaging that deer are trying to psychically commune with him. Charlie is slowly slipping away (possibly) to the effects of Lyme disease. Or he may just be another strung out sixties reject (he says the Lyme disease feels like "perpetual acid trip").

Lyme disease in the Long Island burb is the horror malady of the moment, as constructing new homes smack dab in the middle of the woods may be beautiful but it is also nightmarish. Radio announcers point out that Lyme disease causes psychiatric disturbances and severe mental disorders. Mothers weep at the thought of their kids contracting it and duct-tape the kiddies' clothing together to keep out the ticks. But if Lyme disease is the rampant contagion that all fear, it must have seeped into the residents' skulls and infected their brains. Because the only sensible parental character in Lymelife is Charlie, and he is obviously nuts.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

Wild Hogs Review


OK
Prior to my screening of Wild Hogs, the theatre played an advertisement in which two identical cars "sumo fight" on an elevated circular stage. Each car is distinguished by its performance. One charges forth, its engines roaring healthily, its nose forcing the other back. This other, its engine squealing pathetically, submits to the force of its opponent until eventually plummeting from the edge of the stage. The difference between the two cars? The first was running on superior fuel.

This car reminds me of Wild Hogs. Ostensibly, Wild Hogs is the same model as every other middle-of-the-road road movie; a hybrid vehicle that mishmashes middle-age crisis comedy with fish-out-of-water, city-slicker slapstick. However, its charismatic and effortless cast, and the occasional bit of wit, see that it performs better than the usual Hollywood dross regularly offered up as comedy. Hence its box office success.

Continue reading: Wild Hogs Review

Molly Review


Terrible
Decidedly dumb, this ripoff of Flowers for Algernon has Elisabeth Shue playing the unlikely autism victim who miraculously gains intelligence and bionic powers like super-hearing after an experimental operation -- only to see said powers fade away over time. Shue's acting is atrocious, rivaled only by the idiocy of the story itself. See also At First Sight.

Love in the Time of Money Review


Grim
Filmmaker's dilemma: You want to make a movie with a lot of sex scenes and no plot whatsoever, but you have to make something respectable. Hell, Robert Redford is an executive producer! He isn't going to tolerate any Cinemax soft-core porn.

Answer: String together a bunch of unrelated vignettes revolving around sex. Start with a hooker and her client, then send that client to work to have sex with someone there, then send that woman's husband to an art gallery to have sex with an artist, and send him on his way as well.

Continue reading: Love in the Time of Money Review

Pipe Dream Review


Good
Somewhere between Living in Oblivion and Cyrano de Bergerac lies Pipe Dream, John Walsh's quirky and endearing little comedy about love, the movies, and plumbing.

Martin Donovan stars as David, an everyday plumber who longs for the torrid love affairs that come with being a movie director. With the help of friend RJ (Kevin Carroll) and a script stolen from client/neighbor Toni (Mary-Louise Parker), David reinvents himself as "David Coppelberg," using Toni's script to stage a casting call and meet endless eligible ladies. But the movie, of course, takes on a life of its own, and soon enough David finds himself in the director's chair, with Toni (who's forgiven him for the theft) coaching him from the back seat.

Continue reading: Pipe Dream Review

Exit Wounds Review


Weak

For the first time since "Under Siege" Steven Seagal has managed to make a testosterone-fueled flick that isn't mind-numbingly insipid -- so I guess it would have been too much to hope that "Exit Wounds" might also make even the most remote amount of sense.

This is a movie in which Seagal stars as a tough cop who plays by his own rules (ooo, there's a shock!) and gets in trouble with the brass. This I buy -- it's stupid and unoriginal, but I can go with it if the action is entertaining enough.

This is also a movie in which comely, 31-year-old Jill Hennessey ("Law & Order") plays the commander of the toughest precinct house in Detroit and rapper DMX plays a dot-com millionaire on a private undercover mission to expose police corruption by selling heroin on the web.

Continue reading: Exit Wounds Review

Jill Hennessy

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