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Jessica Walter - FX Networks Upfront Screening Of 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' at AMC Empire 25 theater - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 30th March 2016

Jessica Walter
Jessica Walter
Jessica Walter

Jessica Walter - 2015 Primetime Creative Emmy Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals at Microsoft Theater at LA Live, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th September 2015

Jessica Walter

Jessica Walter - 2015 Creative Arts Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater - Arrivals at Microsoft Theater, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th September 2015

Jessica Walter
Jessica Walter

Jessica Walter - San Diego Comic Con 2015 - Fox party at Andaz Hotel at Andaz hotel - San Diego, California, United States - Friday 10th July 2015

Jessica Walter

Amber Nash, Adam Reed, Jessica Walter and Chris Parnell - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the 2015 FX Bowling Party which was held at Lucky Strike Bowling in New York, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

Amber Nash, Adam Reed, Jessica Walter and Chris Parnell

Primetime Emmy Award Nominations: Will Netflix Triumph With 'Arrested Development'?


Aaron Paul Lena Dunham Tina Fey Game Of Thrones Arrested Development Kate Mara Claire Danes Hugh Dancy Bobby Cannavale Noah Emmerich David Morrissey Matthew Rhys Vera Farmiga Adam Driver Neil Patrick Harris Jessica Walter Jon Cryer Charlie Sheen Jason Bateman Sofia Vergara

The Primetime Emmy Award nominations will be announced on Thursday (18th July). Speculation surrounding the awards is high, with Netflix's Arrested Development predicted to triumph. The awards will be announced by Kate Mara and Aaron Paul.

Aaron Paul
Aaron Paul will announce the nominations on Thursday.

Game Of Thrones is also suspected as a strong contender in the category of Best Drama Series. Homeland who won a number of awards last year is predicted to flop owing to its disappointing second series.

Continue reading: Primetime Emmy Award Nominations: Will Netflix Triumph With 'Arrested Development'?

Arrested Development: Season Two Review


Essential
Season Two is when Arrested Development transcended simply being television's funniest show and became its very best. Its humor became richer and its savage cultural references became slyer and nastier. If the brilliant comedy's first season was enough to forever classify Arrested as a perennial classic, then its second season established the show as one of the great, edgy arbiters of pop cultural significance. No subject was too sacred to be humorously eviscerated by Arrested Development writers, and no uncomfortable human characteristic too dark to be viciously lampooned by their ever-complicated story arcs.

Arrested Development was always an ingenious cross between crisp satire and loopy human cartoon, but season two hit a stride from the start; the season opener, "The One Where Michael Leaves," picks up exactly where the first season left off, and enriches the already-complicated plot with hysterical new wrinkles. Family patriarch George Bluth Sr. (Jeffrey Tambor) has broken out of prison and escaped to Mexico, while well-adjusted middle son and our nobel hero Michael (Jason Batemen) has made a decision to break from the family entirely. As usual, he keeps getting sucked back in for a variety of reasons: with George Sr. on the lam, Michael must prove his innocence in connection with his father's shady business deal with Saddam Hussein (yes, it just keeps getting deeper), and he would also need money to post bail if he were unfairly arrested. But as complicated as Arrested can get, its themes always remain truly simple -- more than any other reason, Michael returns because his family needs him, and Michael himself has a need to be needed.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Two Review

Arrested Development: Season One Review


Essential
Arrested Development is the defining television comedy of the decade. Its influence can be traced through several of the more popular network comedies that debuted since its sad, premature cancellation, most specifically shows like The Office, My Name is Earl, and especially 30 Rock. Created by the now-cult comedy legend Mitch Hurwitz, the show completely redefined what a "sitcom" could and should be -- shot on a single handheld camera, written as a quasi-documentary with a deadpan narrator (a fabulously matter-of-fact Ron Howard), focusing on a family that is barely likable, and telling stories so ridiculous they strain credibility. Yet the show is oddly endearing -- these characters are so fully actualized and the writing so brilliant that every element of the show works seamlessly.

The series made such a mockery of the traditional, homogenized three-camera sitcom with cheap sets and canned laughter, to the point that very few of them even exist anymore. Most TV comedies now chase after the off-the-wall genius of Arrested Development, with its sly, easy-to-miss references to every aspect of current pop culture, and its uncanny knack for testing the devotion (and the memory banks) of its viewers with severely high-risk inside jokes. The show was a bold concept, a sharply radical turn from the ordinary, and the funniest damn program to appear on television before or since its three-season run.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season One Review

Arrested Development: Season Three Review


Extraordinary
The only real flaw in the third season of Mitch Hurwitz's flat-out brilliant sitcom Arrested Development is its unfortunate abbreviation. Fox delighted the show's fan base with a surprise pickup at the end of its second season, and then, apparently feeling remorseful about appeasing any segment of its audience not interested in American Idol, took it back, as far as they could; season three runs only 13 episodes, rather than the standard 22. Needless to say, there will be no season four.

Of course, this being Arrested Development and all, there are more laughs in those 13 episodes than a lifetime of just about any another live-action show. Hurwitz's show chronicles the twists and turns of the formerly wealthy, currently imperiled (and morally impaired) Bluth family, led by good son Michael (Jason Bateman). The show moves like a soap opera, cramming an hour's worth of bizarre plots into 20 minutes or so. Season three contains the most ambitious story arc of the show's run, wherein lovelorn Michael finds a new relationship with Rita (guest star Charlize Theron, appearing in five of the baker's dozen), a charming English woman harboring a deep secret. You may guess the twist ahead of the climactic revelation, but even if you do, it's just as much fun to notice the many clues that start to seem hilariously obvious.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Three Review

Grand Prix Review


Excellent
Sorry, NASCAR fans. Grand Prix isn't your usual chips-hot-dogs-beer-and-babes trip to the speedway.

John Frankenheimer crafts a surprisingly rich and interesting movie that's set during the rise of auto racing. Not only does it capture the spectacle of these tiny little open-air cars hurtling around European village streets (no ovals here), it also builds an interesting story of rivalries, friendly and otherwise.

Continue reading: Grand Prix Review

Ghost In The Machine Review


Weak
Technology has been the Luddite boogeyman since the dawn of time. But it's no longer fashionable to eschew all modern conveniences; the guy who can't turn on a computer has automatically thrown himself out of the gene pool. Heck, at my office (yes, even we esteemed film critics often have day jobs) one of the tech nerds is approaching 80. You've got to evolve to survive, and in our day and age of wireless hotspots and podcasts, fear of the machine equals pariah status. The Luddite is a Cro-Magnon. But our modern culture has always been about dichotomy. And in a purely American way, the Luddites - while unable to download a song or even run a spell check - have something that we techies have lost: an appreciation for the simple, quiet life and old-fashioned, nose-to-the-grindstone work. It goes like this: You can love the machines and get a kick from using them, but rely on them too much and you'll lose your soul. It's like a modern day Descartes-ian dilemma: what really separates us from our technology? The makers of films like Ghost in the Machine argue that all our technological advances have improved our lives but they can't fight off the "real" evil that always surrounds us. The type of evil you can't ctrl-alt-delete away.

Debuting before uncaring audiences in 1993, director Rachel Talalay's (Tank Girl) Ghost in the Machine is a derivative sci-fi/horror hybrid that adds nothing new to the old "amok machine" genre that is represented best by director Donald Cammell's Demon Seed. The plot concerns Karl, the "Address Book Killer," (the horror!) played by Ted Marcoux (Dark Blue), who is killed in a freak accident and has his ever-living and ever-evil soul transferred directly into the power supply. (Don't even ask.) Karl roams the electric highway, possessing all manner of gadgets and kitchenware, as he stalks lovely Karen Allen and her son.

Continue reading: Ghost In The Machine Review

Play Misty For Me Review


Good
For his directorial debut, Clint Eastwood opted to make this relatively straightforward but hopelessly dated Fatal Attraction clone (er, precursor), playing a radio DJ stalked by the lovely Jessica Walter (well, I'm sure her character's style was in back in 1971). Walter is way more ballistic than Glenn Close ever was, wielding a machete on tons of hapless fools standing between her and her man. Creepy, but what's with the outdoor concert stuck into the middle of the movie!?

Dummy Review


Excellent
Just before Adrien Brody delivered his Oscar-winning performance as an isolated and frightened Holocaust survivor in The Pianist, he played a whole different kind of isolated and frightened. As Steven, a lonely underachiever in Greg Pritikin's fantastic indie comedy Dummy, Brody finds solace not in piano music, but in the twisted art of ventriloquism.

It's an offbeat concept that might fit in a chop-'em-up horror movie or a sad, pathetic character study -- yet writer/director Pritikin finds his own niche with the idea, producing a creatively eclectic tale. Dummy is full of exciting surprising laughs, true heart, and enough dysfunctional characters to fill a Wes Anderson film.

Continue reading: Dummy Review

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Dummy Movie Review

Dummy Movie Review

Just before Adrien Brody delivered his Oscar-winning performance as an isolated and frightened Holocaust survivor...

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