Jesse Bradford

Jesse Bradford

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Premiere of 'Entourage' - Arrivals

Jesse Bradford - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at Village Theater, Regency Village Theatre - Westwood, California, United States - Tuesday 2nd June 2015

NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes After Party - Arrivals

Jesse Bradford - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived for NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes after party. The party was sponsored in part by Chrysler, Hilton, and Qatar and was held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Jesse Bradford

Children Mending Hearts Fundraiser 2014

Jesse Bradford - Children Mending Hearts Fundraiser 2014 - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 14th June 2014

Children Mending Hearts 6th annual fundraiser - Arrivals

Jesse Bradford - Children Mending Hearts 6th annual fundraiser 'Empathy Rocks: A Spring into Summer Bash' - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 15th June 2014

Jesse Bradford
Jesse Bradford

10 Rules for Sleeping Around Premiere

Nikki Leigh and Jesse Bradford - 10 Rules for Sleeping Around Premiere - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd April 2014

Jesse Bradford
Jesse Bradford
Nikki Leigh and Jesse Bradford
Nikki Leigh and Jesse Bradford

Flags of Our Fathers Review


Good
At some point during the process of adapting James Bradley's nonfiction book about the battle of Iwo Jima, Clint Eastwood decided he'd need two movies to adequately manage the material's scope. The first, Flags of Our Fathers, focuses solely on the American campaign. It uses Joe Rosenthal's celebrated photograph of the raising of the flag as a springboard for a successful war bonds fund-raiser, and debates with timely flair the use of political spin to salvage an unpopular war.

Eastwood's follow-up, Letters from Iwo Jima, arrives in theaters early next year and will recount the battle from Japan's perspective. The director hired first-time screenwriter Iris Yamashita to develop Letters from an idea that screenwriter Paul Haggis proposed. He will employ an all-Asian cast, and will not use any of the actors we meet in Flags. It is yet to be determined whether the two movies will offer legitimate parallels, or exist as separate entities.

Continue reading: Flags of Our Fathers Review

Heights Review


Grim
Since the modern cinema could easily be said to have a chronic Glenn Close deficiency, it seemed just peachy when the 24-hours-in-some-New-Yorkers'-lives flick Heights opened with a good dose of the lady herself, only to see watch the film spend far too much of the rest of it dealing with other, lesser characters. Close plays Diana Lee, a famous actress moonlighting as an acting teacher who, in that opening scene, tears apart two of her students in front of the whole class, castigating them for their rote recitations of Macbeth. She declaims the modern age's loss of grand emotions and the substitution of meekness, fairly screaming at her worshipful wannabes, "Passion!" If only the movie that proceeded from that point had followed her advice.

As possibly the last film to come out from Merchant Ivory Productions before the May 2005 passing away of Ismail Merchant, Heights is a good deal more lively than the stiff-necked product the duo became known for, but still suffers from a certain bloodlessness. Based on a one-act play and stretched to its limit, the film follows a few New Yorkers through their day as they run about Chelsea and downtown, leading artistic lives and holding some very obvious secrets. Somewhere along the way the viewer is supposed to go "ah!" as the disparate elements come clicking together, but they're more likely to have lost interest at that point, as the light comedy is continually interspersed with a leavening of twentysomething lassitude.

Continue reading: Heights Review

Swimfan Review


Terrible
Erika Christensen goes from zoned-out druggie (Traffic) to lame vanilla psycho in Swimfan, unequivocally one of the worst films of the year.

Stop me if you've heard this one before. A cute young gal named Madison (Christensen) moves to a New Jersey town and instantly becomes smitten with star swimmer Ben (Jesse Bradford). But there's trouble: Ben's got a girlfriend (Shiri Appleby), and he's got a rough past... trouble with drugs and a stint in juvie. Now he's cleaned up and is eyeing a scholarship to Stanford, but an ill-conceived one-nighter with Madison lands him in all kinds of trouble once again.

Continue reading: Swimfan Review

Clockstoppers Review


Terrible
A car going 25 mph is passed by another going 225 mph, but the slower car will appear frozen to the one going faster. This is the rudimentary physics lesson awaiting kids who venture to see the latest Nickelodeon film adventure Clockstoppers.

Teenager Zak (Jesse Bradford) is just days away from getting his dream car, yet his dad (Robin Thomas) is too busy with his complicated inventions to help make Zak's dream become a reality. While his dad is out of town attending a convention, Zak stumbles across a space-age watch that somehow freezes everything in time at the click of a button. At first, Zak and his new friend Francesca (Paula Garces) use their new powers, called hypertime, to play pranks on their friends, but later, they must save their own lives from a group of evil assassins who want the watch back.

Continue reading: Clockstoppers Review

Bring It On Review


Grim
There's a point about 35 minutes into Bring It On where you suddenly realize you're sitting in a movie theater, watching Bring It On, wondering exactly how the hell the events in your life conspired to put your ass in an uncomfortable movie theater seat... to watch Bring It On. But soon you give up, knowing there is no answer to this dilemma, and you resign yourself to watching the next hour of Bring It On, knowing full well that since it's a PG-13 movie, nothing scandalous is ever going to happen to make it interesting.

Going in to this movie, I knew full well it was, well, a movie about cheerleading, so I wasn't expecting another American Beauty (which, now that I think of it, was partly about cheerleading, but anyway...). Suffice it to say that my expectations were low. And sure enough, Bring It On is an utterly vapid film with horrendous character development, hackneyed dialogue, and a questionable theme. No surprise there. Essentially it is Fame in short skirts.

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Happy Endings Review


Good
It's easy for a talented filmmaker to get high on his own talent and fall head over heels in love with his story and characters, to the point where the audience is left somewhat on the outside, peering in through the filmmaker's structural window dressing and trying to figure out what the hell is going on. Don Roos (The Opposite of Sex) has the ability to be one of those guys, and comes close to it in his Short Cuts-esque panoramic comedy Happy Endings but avoids temptation - for the better enjoyment of everyone involved.

The title is a joke, sort of, like much of the film. It starts with a panicked Lisa Kudrow running frantically through a residential neighborhood, dashing out into the street and getting hit by a car. Then a split screen informs us that she's actually not dead, that "no one dies in this movie," and the film proceeds, in the same jokey, needling manner, to introduce us to the rest of the players in this Los Angeles smashed relationship derby. Kudrow plays Mamie, a tense woman emotionally scarred after that time in her adolescence when got pregnant and gave the baby up for adoption. That memory comes smashing back into her life when wannabe documentarian Nicky (Jesse Bradford, gloriously clueless) shows up, claiming to be friends with her son, and saying he'll reunite them, but only if Mamie helps him make his debut film. Mamie's contribution to said project is the participation of her masseuse boyfriend Javier (Bobby Cannavale), pretending to be a gigolo for the sake of Nicky's awful excuse for a documentary.

Continue reading: Happy Endings Review

Happy Endings Review


OK
A comedy-of-life roundelay about several sexually mixed-updenizens of L.A., "Happy Endings" returns writer-director DonRoos to the sardonic psychological territory he trod in his stinging black-humordebut "The Opposite of Sex."

After opening with a hysterical woman named Mamie (LisaKudrow) getting hit by a car, he introduces a humorously detached meta-filmnarration style when the screen splits in two, and words appear on a blackbackground to reassure us that "No one dies in this movie. It's acomedy. Sort of."

"What happens next," the lettering continues,"was 20 years ago" -- at which point we learn that Mamie gotknocked up at 16 and was supposed to have an abortion, but secretly gaveup the baby for adoption. The unknowing father was her stepbrother Charley(Steve Coogan), who is now gay ("Who isn't?" quips the text onthe screen) and has run the family restaurant business into the groundsince the death of their parents.

But Roos is just getting warmed up. Soon an aspiring documentaryfilmmaker (a scruffy Jesse Bradford) with zero scruples is offering angry,neurotic Mamie information about her son -- but only if he can make a movieabout their reunion. Connected more loosely to these characters are a lesbiancouple (Laura Dern and Sarah Clarke) who may have secretly conceived theirchild with Charley's boyfriend's sperm, and Jude (Maggie Gyllenhaal), ablunt and sultry free-spirited young gold-digger who seduces a sexuallyconflicted rich kid (Jason Ritter) on her way to landing a much biggerfish -- his lonely dad (Tom Arnold).

Continue reading: Happy Endings Review

Heights Review


OK

A deft ensemble drama with a hard emotional veracity ref=lectingthe complexity that sexual histories impose on modern relationships, "=Heights"takes place over 24 hours that prove unexpectedly pivotal to each of itsof cross-pollinating Manhattan lives.

At the center of one of the film's concentric social circ=lesis Isabel (Elizabeth Banks, "Seabiscuit,&=quot;"CatchMe If You Can"), an aspiring photographe=r,stuck in a rut of wedding assignments. Her engagement to handsome younglawyer Jonathan (James Marsden) is tempered by subtle undercurrents ofuncertainty that may be tested by a pining ex-boyfriend's offer of a dreamassignment for a prestigious news magazine.

Isabel's mother Diana (Glenn Close) -- a blunt, outwardlyself-confident, highly respected stage actress and theater professor atJulliard -- is the hub of another, upper-crust conclave. Her quite liberalopen marriage has taken its toll on her psychological buoyancy (and herdaughter's views of fidelity), especially in the wake of her husband'scurrent philandering with her own understudy from a Broadway productionof "Macbeth."

Continue reading: Heights Review

Swimfan Review


Grim

"Swimfan" is the kind of thriller that requires, for the plot to move forward, a complete absence of common sense on the part of the hero -- in this case a high school swim team star (Jesse Bradford) with a sultry, psycho, jailbait stalker (Erika Christensen).

No matter what crazy thing the deranged girl does to him -- leave her panties in his car, email him 81 times in a day, spike his urine sample with steroids, frame him for murder -- Bradford never tells a single person what's really going on because if anyone was watching his back, there would be no movie.

Which isn't to say "Swimfan" doesn't have its guilty pleasures. OK, one guilty pleasure. Christensen -- Michael Douglas's smack-addicted daughter in "Traffic," a beautiful girl with the heart-shaped face and sly, portentous eyes -- is such a fun, wicked, spiteful villainess that she keeps the flick afloat all by herself.

Continue reading: Swimfan Review

Clockstoppers Review


Weak

Back in the early 1970s, far-fetched kiddie caper matinees came out almost every other week. They were low-budget, weakly-plotted, G-rated adventures in which clever pubescents and/or teenagers outsmarted cartoonishly nefarious adults who worked for the government or a Big Mean Corporation and were always were up to no good.

These movies were hit-and-miss throwaway fare like "The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes" (featuring teenage Kurt Russell), "Candleshoe" (teenage Jodie Foster) and "Escape from Witch Mountain." But they had a certain cheap charm that seems to be making a colorful, high-tech comeback in films like "Spy Kids," "Big Fat Liar" and the new kids-with-gadgets escapade "Clockstoppers."

This one stars Jesse Bradford (bewitched by Kirsten Dunst in "Bring It On") as Zak, a resourceful high schooler (he sells garage-sale finds on eBay to save for a car) who gets his hands on an experimental wristwatch that can speed up his molecules to the point where time seems to stand still for the rest of the world.

Continue reading: Clockstoppers Review

Jesse Bradford

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