Jeremy Sisto

Jeremy Sisto

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Break Point Trailer


Jimmy Price knows his days as a doubles tennis player are nearly over, and since he's made a few enemies on the pro circuit, things start to look bleak when his latest partner drops him. With no other option, Jimmy tries to revive his career by convincing his estranged brother (and former tennis partner) Darren to give their partnership another shot. With the help of an 11-year-old named Barry, the duo enter a grand slam tournament, but are they out of their depth?

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Los Angeles premiere of Disney's 'Cinderella'

Jeremy Sisto, Addie Lane, Bastian Kick Sisto and Charlie Ballerina Sisto - A host of stars were snapped as they attended the premiere of Disney's "Cinderella" The premiere was held at at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st March 2015

Jeremy Sisto, Addie Lane, Bastian Kick Sisto and Charlie Ballerina Sisto
Jeremy Sisto, Addie Lane, Bastian Kick Sisto and Charlie Ballerina Sisto

The 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards

Jeremy Sisto - The 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals at Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto

30th Film Independent Spirit Awards

Jeremy Sisto - 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals at Tent on the beach, Independent Spirit Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto

2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards

Jeremy Sisto and Darby Stanchfield - 2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at Santa Monica Beach - Departures at Independent Spirit Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards

Jeremy Sisto - The 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals at Santa Monica Beach, Independent Spirit Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto
Jeremy Sisto

Robot & Frank Review


Good

A warm drama that drifts into light, goofy comedy, this film is too slight to be a classic, but its subtly sharp-edged script holds our interest and gives the cast something to work with. Frequently very funny, this is much more than just a story of an old man with a robotic sidekick, as it explores jagged family relationships and even features a lively caper subplot.

At the centre is Frank (Langella), who doesn't want to leave the rural home where he raised his now-adult children (Marsden and Tyler). Even as they have their own lives far away, they worry about him living alone, so his son buys him a robot assistant (voiced by Sarsgaard) whose only mission is to look after Frank's mental and physical health. Frank dismissively names it "Robot" and tries to ignore it until he realises that its prime directive allows it to help him secretly relaunch his cat-burgling career. His first target is to rescue the town library run by his old friend Jennifer (Sarandon), which is about to be turned into a high-tech social centre by a young businessman (Strong).

Director Shreier keeps the film's pace gentle, underplaying both the comedy and suspense while letting Langella indulge in an enjoyably grumpy scene-stealing performance. Frank may be losing his memory, but he is still sharp as a tack when it comes to planning a heist, especially with the help of Robot. And watching him build up the confidence to pursue Jennifer is enjoyable as well. Meanwhile, Sarsgaard nods to 2001's Hal in the way he invests Robot with deadpan humour and emotion. By comparison, none of the side characters has much to do since they haven't a clue about what Frank is up to.

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Waitress Review


Good
Keri Russell had a certain low-key, empathetic quality as the sensitive coed on the WB series Felicity, but nothing about that whispery, earnest role indicated she could carry a movie herself, especially as a different character altogether. In Waitress she plays Jenna, an unhappily married young woman who channels her frustrations into the creation of fantastic pies, and taps a reservoir of star quality; it takes considerable charisma for an actress to likably cuss out her unborn child (she doesn't fantasize about a son or a daughter; she writes the child letters that start with "dear baby").

The film, written and directed by the late Adrienne Shelly, opens with Jenna discovering this pregnancy, and despairing over the fact that it ties her to her surly, controlling husband Earl (Jeremy Sisto). She dreams of escape plans, squirreling away tip money from her titular job and soliciting advice from her two friends and co-workers, while peevishly and secretly attending doctor's appointments with Dr. Pomatter (Nathan Fillion). In the back of her mind, Jenna seems to know that keeping secrets and extra cash may not be enough; her escape is attempted through a series of half-measures.

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Unknown Review


Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

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Unknown Review


Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

May Review


Good
How refreshing, after the mild thrills of movies like Final Destination 2 and Wrong Turn, to watch a horror movie with some inner life. It's easy to describe Lucky McKee's May in terms of its similarities to other films; it owes a lot to Brian DePalma's Carrie (lead actress Angela Bettis even played Carrie in the TV-movie redo), with its meek anti-heroine and eventual havoc. To that end, it also brings to mind the Willard remake from earlier this year, with its darkly funny approach to a social outcast, and even bears a passing, coincidental resemblance to sort of a horror version of 2002's Secretary. But May is its own film, made with confidence and skill.

The title character (Bettis) does not have telekinetic powers or a special relationship with rats, although she does work as a vet's assistant. She is an awkward, lonely girl; we see in flashbacks that she was rejected as a child: By other children, because of her lazy eye (and resulting eyepatch); and by her parents, through general indifference and for reasons not entirely known. We see her mother present May with a doll on her birthday, but won't let May take it out of the box, not wanting to "ruin" it; years later, the doll is May's only friend.

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Some Girls Review


Grim
Some Girls takes the tired old movie about an ensemble of jaded, twentysomething youths in New York City, all looking for meaning and finding nothing but bitter heartbreak, and dramatically updates it, transforming this film into an ensemble of jaded, twentysomething youths in Los Angeles, all looking for meaning and finding nothing but bitter heartbreak.

While there's not much to recommend in this indie study of pretentiousness, it's curious for the Ribisi siblings -- Marissa, the stunning redhead best known from her cameo in The Brady Bunch Movie, and her brother Giovanni, who strikes a much different character here than he's usually typecast in.

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Hideaway Review


Terrible
Let's get this straight. Hideaway is the worst movie I've seen in months. Watch Jeff Goldblum dance around for two hours trying to keep Aerosmith's favorite video girl, Alicia Silverstone, from getting whacked by the bad guy. Yawn. Only the heavy metal soundtrack is redeemable: it keeps the audience awake.

Grand Canyon Review


Good
Lawrence Kasdan's Grand Canyon is as enigmatic as movies get. On the one hand, it's got a great cast, an ominous soundtrack, and Steve Martin burning through some of the best monologues on film ("All of life's riddles are answered in the movies!"). On the other hand, Kasdan's film is so hopeless and despairing that it's hard to ever properly embrace: In the space of two hours, Kasdan's characters get shot at, murdered, nearly carjacked, nearly seduced into adulterous affairs, shot for real, discover abandoned babies, and generally bemoan the horrors of modern life. Kasdan is intent on getting one point across and one only: America has gone to the dogs, as exemplified by the horrors of Los Angeles.

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Suicide Kings Review


OK
So-so thriller about a bunch of guys who kidnap a mob boss in order to guarantee the return of one of their sisters. Or something like that. Dumb premise. Mediocre execution.
Jeremy Sisto

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