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Justice League Teaser Trailer


In the wake of his friend Clark Kent's monumental sacrifice, Bruce Wayne and Diana Prince are determined to recruit the most powerful superheroes on the planet to help them fight a new menace that Lex Luthor predicted was coming to the Earth. They are the intrepid Arthur Curry or Aquaman, king of the sea; the young but lightning-fast Barry Allen, also known as The Flash; and the half-man half-machine known as Victor Stone or Cyborg. Together they must fight an army of parademons that have descended upon them, apparently in search of the Mother Box that transformed Victor Stone into the biomechanical creature he is. They are serving the villainous extra-terrestrial Steppenwolf, who will stop at nothing to get what he wants and take over the world. But as you can probably work out, these heroes have an advantage in that Superman is far from dead as they initially suspected.

Continue: Justice League Teaser Trailer

Their Finest Trailer


It's the early 1940s and World War II is in full swing. Bombs are raining down on London in the Blitzkrieg threatening to tear the country in two, but the British are made of sturdier stuff. Catrin Cole is a writer who comes to realise that the absence of ambitious young men in the workplace due to recruitment into the army has opened a door for her. She is appointed by the film division of the Ministry of Information to write the supplementary women's dialogue of a new propaganda film about Dunkirk, however she is told that she'll get no screen credit and won't be paid as much as her male counterparts. She goes one step further and writes the whole script, impressing all involved if leaving them a little indignant. Plus, she finds an unlikely ally in an aging film star named Ambrose Hilliard, who longs for the days he had major roles.

Continue: Their Finest Trailer

Assassin's Creed Review

Weak

Hopes were high that this film might finally crack the curse of movies based on videogames. There may have been some hits (like Tomb Raider or the Resident Evil franchise), but none has ever been critically acclaimed. So perhaps reuniting the cast and director of 2015's Macbeth might finally break the cycle. But while there's plenty of whizzy stuntwork, this film never finds a story or characters to grab hold of the audience.

In present-day Texas, death row prisoner Cal (Michael Fassbender) is executed by lethal injection and wakes up in a gloomy fortress towering over Madrid. He's been saved by shady businessman Rikkin (Jeremy Irons), whose daughter Sofia (Marion Cotillard) is a scientist experimenting with DNA memory. Rikkin needs Cal to travel back into his own history using a mechanical contraption called an Animus to find out where his 15th century ancestor Aguilar (also Fassbender) hid the Apple of Eden, which holds the key to controlling human will. But Cal discovers that he is the last in a long line of Assassins who have sworn to protect the apple from Knights Templar like Rikkin or his imperious supreme leader Ellen (the fabulously gloomy Charlotte Rampling).

The idea is a clever one, and director Justin Kurzel keeps the visuals grounded with action that feels earthy and real rather than digitally manipulated. Indeed, the combination of sleek sci-fi thrills with medieval fantasy horror is very cool. But there's one huge problem with the premise: all of the big fight sequences and eye-catching parkour acrobatics take place in distant history. Cal can experience these things, but he can't actually do anything, so there's no peril involved. Instead, we get endless explanations of the technology and historical inter-connections, which never quite make sense regardless of how much the characters talk about them.

Continue reading: Assassin's Creed Review

Assassin's Creed Trailer


Callum Lynch is a criminal facing the death sentence but is given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to escape his fate by joining the mysterious Animus Project set up by Abstergo Industries. Abstergo is to its time essentially what the Knights Templar was in the 12th and 13th century, and want to hook Lynch up to an experimental piece of technology that will allow him to experience and explore the memories of his ancestor Aguilar de Nerha who lived as an Assassin in 15th century Spain. He's returning to the age of the Spanish Inquisition which means he must absorb the warrior skills of his long-dead relative - but that only means that he's developing the tools to take down the organisation that pose a threat to him in the modern day. 

Continue: Assassin's Creed Trailer

Justice League - Comic Con Trailer


Bruce Wayne knows that the Earth is under threat from evil forces much worse than any he's - or any other superhero - has previously seen. To defend the people of Earth, Bruce and Diana Prince (Wonder Woman) decide to hunt down some of the most skilled individuals the planet has to offer, each of these people have a special talent and could play a vital part in saving the world.

As well as the new recruits (who include Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash) Batman also recruits Wonder Woman who previously fought alongside Superman whilst trying to beat Lex Luthor's incredibly strong genetically-engineered creature which also killed Superman. The fate of Superman is unclear but given the end of Batman Vs. Superman it's presumed that Superman will return to life albeit potentially temporarily weakened.

The Justice League is DC Comics’ superhero team and it’s thought that a supervillain called Steppenwolf will be their main target – though it’s sure that Lex Luthor will appear and cause as much trouble as he possibly can.

Continue: Justice League - Comic Con Trailer

Jeremy Irons - Celebrities arrive at the South Bank Sky Arts Awards at the Savoy Hotel in London at The Savoy Hotel, South Bank - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 5th June 2016

Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons

Charlotte Rampling , Jeremy Irons - The Southbank Sky Arts Awards 2016 - Arrivals at The Savoy Hotel - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 5th June 2016

Charlotte Rampling and Jeremy Irons
Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling and Jeremy Irons
Charlotte Rampling

Chris Evans' Breakfast Show Will Not Face Further Action Over Jeremy Irons Swearing Incident


Jeremy Irons Chris Evans

Chris Evans’ Radio 2 breakfast show will not face further action from media regulator Ofcom, after actor Jeremy Irons swore live on the show during a March 18th broadcast. The show had been investigated after a listener complained it had broken rule 2.3 of the broadcasting code regarding offence and offensive language.

Jeremy IronsJeremy Irons swore live on BBC Radio 2 on March 18th, promoting an Ofcom investigation.

Irons had been telling an anecdote about fellow actor John Hurt when he dropped the f-bomb live on air. “John and I were moaning about [good young actors],” Irons began, “And he said, ‘You know what I do when I find a good actor? I say to him, ‘You have a wonderful voice. Have you ever listened to it? And the actor is f***ed’.”

Continue reading: Chris Evans' Breakfast Show Will Not Face Further Action Over Jeremy Irons Swearing Incident

Assassin's Creed Trailer


Assassin's Creed sees Michael Fassbender cast as the protagonist Callum Lynch, in this action adventure film that is based on the video game franchise of the same name. Lynch's identity no longer exists and he is forced by revolutionary technology to hear, see and feel the memories of his ancestor Aguilar de Nerha, who was an assassin during the Spanish Inquisition.

Continue: Assassin's Creed Trailer

Chris Evans' BBC Radio 2 Show Under Ofcom Investigation After Jeremy Irons 'F-Bomb'


Chris Evans Jeremy Irons

Chris Evans’ BBC Radio 2 breakfast show is to be the subject of an Ofcom investigation after guest Jeremy Irons dropped a sizeable ‘f-bomb’ while on air last month.

The media watchdog confirmed on Monday (April 25th) that they would be conducting an inquiry as to whether or not the actor’s use of such a swear word constituted a breach of rules regarding offensive language before the watershed.

Jeremy IronsJeremy Irons dropped the 'f-bomb' during an appearance on BBC Radio 2 in March

Continue reading: Chris Evans' BBC Radio 2 Show Under Ofcom Investigation After Jeremy Irons 'F-Bomb'

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Review

Good

After 2013's beefy Man of Steel, director Zack Snyder goes even bigger and darker with this sequel, cross-pollenating Clark Kent's story with flashbacks to the origins of Bruce Wayne and his Dark Knight alter-ego. The problem is that the film is so big and loud that it can't help but feel bloated, especially since so much of what's on screen feels rather vacuous. But it looks amazing and is relentlessly gripping.

After a Bat-origin prologue, the story kicks off with the climactic battle from Man of Steel as seen from the perspective of Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck), watching his city being destroyed by Superman (Henry Cavill). This further fuels the rage that began when his parents were murdered. And that fire is stoked by the mischievous millionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Meanwhile, Superman/Clark is struggling with how the world is revering him as a god, which is straining his relationship with intrepid reporter Lois (Amy Adams). As these very different vigilante heros head toward a climactic confrontation, Luthor is up to something seriously nefarious. And the ensuing chaos brings another hero into the open, Wonder Woman Diana Prince (Gal Gadot).

While the various plot threads are fascinating, and Snyder maintains a snappy pace, the overall story centres on the fact that Affleck's prickly, bitter Bruce is easily manipulated into doing terrible things, which makes him rather unlikeable. And Cavill's fundamentally good Clark isn't much easier to identify with. Both are also oddly constrained by their costumes and bulked-up physicalities, which leave them unable to move properly. This allows the side characters to steal the show: Adams adds emotion and passion, Eisenberg provides the nutty nastiness, Irons is hilariously cynical as Bruce's butler Alfred, and Fishburne is all bluster as Lois' editor. But in the end, the film belongs to the gorgeous, clear-headed Gadot, instantly making her stand-alone movie the most anticipated superhero project on the horizon.

Continue reading: Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Review

High-Rise Review

Weak

After a string of award-winning arthouse hits like Kill List and A Field in England, director Ben Wheatley and writer Amy Jump stumble with this adaptation of the 1970s J.G. Ballard novel. The satirical dystopian setting offers buckets of eye-popping visual style, plus outrageously twisted characters the A-list cast have a lot of fun sinking their teeth into. But while the themes are strong, the people on screen are so aggressively loathsome that it's not an easy movie to watch.

It's set in a brutal concrete tower within commuting distance of London, where new resident Robert (Tom Hiddleston) is learning his way around the building's modern, self-contained design. He especially enjoys flirting with his sexy upstairs neighbour Charlotte (Sienna Miller). But the building has a social structure that is creating some serious tension. Wealthy residents like the tower's architect Anthony (Jeremy Irons) live at the top, while economically struggling families like Helen and Richard (Elisabeth Moss and Luke Evans) are closer to the ground, with middle-class families in between. So when the lower floors lose their supply of water and electricity, they revolt against the upper classes, waging all-out war in the hallways.

The political commentary is astute and perhaps even more timely today than it was in 1975, when the novel was written and when the film is set. And each of the characters is full of energy and anger. So it's frustrating that the choppy editing style seems to lose track of people and plot-threads as it shifts around to various angles on the action. This makes all of the violence and sex feel oddly random and excessive, as things get increasingly nasty and each of the people loses the audience's sympathy. Hiddleston has terrific presence, but the film kind of abandons him along the way. While Irons is hamming it up shamelessly, Evans is inexplicably brutal and both Moss and Miller are little more than victims.

Continue reading: High-Rise Review

High-Rise Trailer


'If only we had enough money to move to a bigger house', an ongoing predicament in most households around the world. Just a little more space, just a little more comfort.  Robert Laing is a young doctor who's currently embracing the single life. 

Robert thinks that a beautiful closed off high-rise apartment is just the place for him to make a home. His flat is located on the twenty-fifth floor which is somewhere in the middle and as Robert settles in and is introduced to his new neighbours, he soon begins to realise that there's a hierarchy within the building -the higher the floor you're on, the more your life is worth. 

The higher you go in the 40-odd floored building, the more palatial your surroundings become. Somehow the man behind the design of the building appears to hold more answers than he's willing to give. Lines are soon crossed and war breaks out between the self-imposed floor class system. 

Continue: High-Rise Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer


Every superhero has a dark side and being 100% human, Batman is in doubt over how genuine Superman actually is. After all, Superman is from a different planet and has incredibly natural powers; powers that could easily destroy our world.

As Lex Luther manipulates Batman and Superman into a deeper and deeper war, the duo find that they are pitted against a force that's much more of a present threat than either of the heroes. They are joined by a number of other heroes (including Wonder Woman and The Flash) on a quest to save earth from immediate danger.

Warner Bros. Pictures releases Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice in cinemas 25 March 2016.

Sinead Cusack , Jeremy Irons - The Charles Finch & Chanel Pre-BAFTAS Dinner at Annabel's - Outside Arrivals at BAFTAS - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 13th February 2016

Sinead Cusack and Jeremy Irons

Race Trailer


Race follows the life of athlete Jesse Owens and more specifically his athletic career as he embarked on his journey to the 1936 Olympics. Jesse was fast on the track, he constantly beat his competition and when he began training with Ohio State University coach Larry Snyder, he was pinned to be the best of the best. One of the major problems that faced him was that the 1932 games were set to take place in Germany which was ruled by the Nazis.

Being a black athlete, Jesse often faced discrimination and when he finally gained a place on the Olympic field team, Jesse was put under pressure by some of the community to send a message to the Nazi regime and equally a message of support to show solidarity with the oppressed people of Germany.

Jesse had to find a way to fulfil his dream and represent himself, what he stands for and to also win a medal for the people of USA who are counting on him to 'beat those Nazis' who viewed African Americans as inferior beings.

Jeremy Irons - ICAP Charity Day held at One Broadgate - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 9th December 2015

Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer


What happens when two superheroes with vastly differing opinions come head to head? Well, not very well if Lex Luthor has anything to do with it. Superman believes Batman is a vigilante and the civil liberties of the people of Gotham are 'being trampled on' whilst Batman feels Superman's abilities are blown out of proportion by the media and is far from a fan of his superhero outfit.

Lex Luthor has enough power to manipulate this situation to his benefit and pitches both heroes against one another - Son of Krypton versus Bat of Gotham however, when his plan doesn't go exactly to plan he creates a monster to destroy both men - on the verge of destruction, Batman and Superman are joined by Wonder Woman, Aquaman and other superheroes on their quest to save their city from destruction.

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice is directed by Zack Snyder and it's a precursor to The Justice League films - which are also written and directed by Snyder.

Jeremy Irons , Sinead Cusack - Evening Standard Theatre Awards at the Old Vic - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 22nd November 2015

Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack

Jeremy Irons - Royal Ascot 2015 held at Ascot Racecourse - Day 3 - Ladies Day at Royal Ascot - Ascot, United Kingdom - Thursday 18th June 2015

Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons

Niamh Cusack, Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack - Gala Celebration in Honour of Kevin Spacey held at the Old Vic Theatre - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th April 2015

Niamh Cusack, Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack
Niamh Cusack, Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack
Niamh Cusack and Sinead Cusack
Niamh Cusack, Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack

Sinead Cusak and Jeremy Irons - Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty - Private View at London - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 15th March 2015

Sinead Cusak and Jeremy Irons

Sinead Cusack and Jeremy Irons - Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty - private view - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 14th March 2015

Jeremy Irons - Jeremy Irons out and about in the West End - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 10th June 2014

Jeremy Irons

Glenn Close, Jeremy Irons and Keri Russell - Sundance Institute Vanguard Leadership Award at Stage 37 - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 4th June 2014

Glenn Close, Jeremy Irons and Keri Russell
Glenn Close, Jeremy Irons and Keri Russell
Glenn Close, Jeremy Irons and Keri Russell

Andy Wallace, Bernard Kuhnt, Brian Johnson, Charlie Turner, David Blakeley, Elliot Gleave, Erin Gleave, Ian Callum, Jason Barlow, Jay Leno, Jeremy Irons, Jodie Kidd, John Edwards, Jonathan Vandenbroeck, Mark Dixon, Martin Brundle, May, Mike Cross, Mikey Harvey, Mille Miglia, Milow, Richard Frankel and Therma Abano Montegrotto - Jaguar Heritage celebrity driver line up for 2014 Mille Miglia. Fiera De Brescia, Italy - Brescia, Italy - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Andy Wallace, Bernard Kuhnt, Brian Johnson, Charlie Turner, David Blakeley, Elliot Gleave, Erin Gleave, Ian Callum, Jason Barlow, Jay Leno, Jeremy Irons, Jodie Kidd, John Edwards, Jonathan Vandenbroeck, Mark Dixon, Martin Brundle, May, Mike Cross, Mikey Harvey, Mille Miglia, Milow, Richard Frankel and Therma Abano Montegrotto
Example and Erin Gleave

Jeremy Irons - The 57th Annual San Francisco International Film Festival presents 'An evening with Jeremy Irons' - San Francisco, California, United States - Wednesday 30th April 2014

Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons and Noah Cowan
Jeremy Irons and Noah Cowan
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons and Noah Cowan

Jeremy Irons - Actor Jeremy Irons makes an appearance on Spanish TV show El Hormiguero. Irons is joined by a hairless cat (Sphynx cat) and also plays a Spanish flemenco style guitar - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 9th April 2014

Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons

The Words Review


Good

Like a Russian nesting doll, this film tells a story within a story within another story, playing around with fact and fiction, as well as the nature of creative inspiration and integrity. These themes are thoroughly engaging, although the film has a nagging familiarity to it because of its cliched story elements. And the structure prevents us from getting properly involved in any of the three story strands.

The main narrator is Clay (Quaid), who is reading from his book The Words, which tells the story of writer Rory (Cooper) and his wife Dora (Saldana), who struggled for five years before his first novel was published to rapturous acclaim from both critics and the public. But out of the shadows emerges an old man (Irons) who knows Rory's secret: he found the manuscript for the novel in a briefcase he bought in a Paris junk shop, then passed it off as his own. So the old man in turn tells Rory his own story, about when he was a younger man (Barnes) in Paris married to a French waitress (Arnezeder).

The layered storytelling lets filmmakers explore quite a few big issues, from the way most novels are based on elements from the writers' lives to the ruthlessness of the publishing industry, in which even the most talented authors struggle to earn a living. But of course, most of the characters in the film are fictional, so we never become very invested in their situations. And the only "real" person is Quaid's cocky, leery Clay, who's engaged in squirm-inducing flirtation with a grad student (Wilde) who stalks him.

Continue reading: The Words Review

Jeremy Irons On Gay Marriage: “Could A Father Not Marry His Son?"


Jeremy Irons

After suggesting that he “doesn’t have a strong feeling either way” about gay marriage, Jeremy Irons has now caused controversy by suggesting the legalization of gay marriage could lead to a tax loophole betwixt father and son.

“Could a father not marry his son?" queries Irons, clearly not really thinking straight. When reminded that incest is illegal, and that marrying a direct relative is against the law, Irons said: “It's not incest between men", adding, “Incest is there to protect us from inbreeding, but men don't breed." A spokesman for Stonewall, the lesbian, gay and bisexual charity, said: "Few people will agree with Jeremy Irons’ bizarre 'concerns' about equal marriage.” Referring to his role as Pope Alexander VI in 2011 television series The Borgias, he added: “Sadly his comments do seem to indicate he's taken his role as a Pope in The Borgias a little too seriously." Irons, in a similarly weird way, talked about gay marriage to The Huffington Post. He said he wished "everybody whose living with one other person the best of luck in the world because it's fantastic”.

He added: “Living with another animal, whether it be a husband or a dog, is great. It's lovely to have someone to love. I don't think sex matters at all. What it's called doesn't matter at all." We can’t really figure out what that means, let alone if we agree with it or not.

Continue reading: Jeremy Irons On Gay Marriage: “Could A Father Not Marry His Son?"

Jeremy Irons Mocked For Strange Gay-Marriage Incest Comments


Jeremy Irons

Jeremy Irons has incited quite a reaction for his comments about gay marriage - some severe criticism, though also plenty of mockery. The 64-year-old Lolita star queried whether new same-sex marriage laws could lead fathers to marry their own sons in order to avoid inheritance tax. When pushed on the topic, Irons told the Huffington Post, "Could a father not marry his son?"

When the interviewer pointed out that sexual relations between family members is illegal, Irons responded, "It's not incest between men. Incest is there to protect us from inbreeding, but men don't breed." The comments sparked plenty of discussion on social networking sites, though a spokesman for Stonewall, the lesbian, gay and bisexual charity slammed his views, saying, "Few people will agree with Jeremy Irons's bizarre 'concerns' about equal marriage." Over in the U.S, talk show host and political commentator Stephen Colbert mocked the remarks on his show The Colbert Report, saying, "So, if gay marriage is legalised in England, Jeremy Irons's son Max: Get ready to make your father the happiest man alive."

In the interview, Irons somewhat bizarrely threw animals into the equation, adding, "Living with another animal, whether it be a husband or a dog, is great. It's lovely to have someone to love. I don't think sex matters at all. What it's called doesn't matter at all."

Continue reading: Jeremy Irons Mocked For Strange Gay-Marriage Incest Comments

Beautiful Creatures... Ugly Box Office Results. Fantasy Drama Fails To Attract An Audience


Emma Thompson Jeremy Irons

Beautiful Creatures may boast a stellar cast, with the likes of Emma Thompson and Jeremy Irons in the midst of its line-up, but that did not save it from a receiving a serious trouncing in the press and a bitterly disappointing opening weekend. The movie, which only managed to dredge up a meagre 44% on the Rotten Tomatoes review site, opened with just $7.5 million in domestic box office sales.

It seems that a smattering of quality cast members simply wasn’t enough to save Beautiful Creatures. Touted as the next Twilight, the overall look of the movie feels cheap in comparison and the story (boy moves to small Southern town, boy meets girl, boy discovers girl’s dark secrets) felt all too familiar and yawnsome. Too amateur-looking to draw in the adult crossover audience that Twilight and The Hunger Games so successfully entrapped and lacking the hype that they benefitted from so greatly, Beautiful Creatures has simply fallen through the cracks and failed to find its niche.

The top earner for the President's Day Weekend sales (and let’s not forget, it was also Valentine’s Day Weekend) was the latest Bruce Willis blockbuster, A Good Day To Die Hard, which somehow rakes in $25 million in its debut weekend, despite having received even worse reviews than Beautiful Creatures and managed only a laughable 16% score on Rotten Tomatoes. 

Continue reading: Beautiful Creatures... Ugly Box Office Results. Fantasy Drama Fails To Attract An Audience

Beautiful Creatures Reviews – Critical Response Is Mixed


Jeremy Irons Emma Thompson

The Beautiful Creatures reviews are out, and it would appear as though the supernatural drama has divided the critics. Let’s have a look.

The inevitable comparisons to Twilight are ample, and like the vampire franchise, Beautiful Creatures is set for sequel after sequel; something The Telegraph wouldn’t mind. “There's just enough here to make the inevitable sequels a not-entirely-unwelcome prospect,” they write in a review that seems positive and negative at the same time. The Los Angeles Times’ review were delighted with it, saying “The movie is an intriguing, intelligent enigma - three words not typically associated with teen romances.” Similarly, Time Magazine seemed to accept it for what it is: “Beautiful Creatures is good fun and I want to know what happens next for Lena the teenaged witch.”

Continue reading: Beautiful Creatures Reviews – Critical Response Is Mixed

Beautiful Creatures Review


Very Good

While this package has all of the key marketing elements to reach the Twilight audience, the film itself is rather a lot more fun, made with some wit and intelligence, plus a cast that's happy to chomp on the scenery. Based on a four-novel series, this film actually has more in common with True Blood than Twilight, with its Deep South setting and the clash between religious fundamentalism and supernatural beings.

At the centre is Ethan (Ehrehreich), a 16-year-old who is bristling against the isolation of his small South Carolina town. His recently deceased mother instilled in him a love of books banned by the town's hyper-religious leaders, and the local librarian Amma (Davis) helps keep his interest alive. As a result, he's more open than the other teens when Lena (Englert) arrives at school. But she's shunned because her Uncle Macon (Irons) is the town's pariah, a landowner whom everyone thinks is a devil worshipper. Actually, the whole family are casters, people with special powers that are designated good or evil on their 16th birthday. 

The plot stirs up some suspense as Lena's big day of reckoning approaches. She's terrified that she'll go over to the dark side like her man-eating cousin (Rossum) or, worse still, her spectral mother, who does her mischief by inhabiting the body of the town's most pious housewife Mrs Lincoln (Thompson). This of course gives Thompson two insane characters to play at the same time, and she has a ball with it. As does Irons with the shadowy, snaky Macon. And at the centre, Ehrenreich and Englert both show considerable promise, with their strikingly non-Hollywood good looks and a depth of character that makes the film more engaging than we expect.

Continue reading: Beautiful Creatures Review

Good Genes Or Good Ops: Which Male Celebrities Don't Show Their Age?


Anthony Kiedis David Beckham Tom Cruise Jim Carrey George Clooney Eddie Murphy Wayne Coyne Colin Firth Antonio Banderas Bono Kevin Spacey Prince Donny Osmond Tom Hanks Christoph Waltz Anthony Bourdain Bruce Willis Jeff Daniels Rowan Atkinson Chris Noth Denzel Washington Liam Neeson Jeff Goldblum Bruce Springsteen Lionel Richie Jeff Bridges Samuel L Jackson Jeremy Irons David Letterman Ted Danson Harrison Ford Amitabh Bachchan Morgan Freeman Dustin Hoffman Dick Van Dyke Roger Moore Rolling Stones

We've all had that moment; looking at photos of our favourite celebs and then jumping out of our seats screaming, 'He's HOW old?!' Well, we've been doing a lot of that here at ContactMusic. Some stars seem to have crept up the age ladder pretty sneakily, the odd wrinkle and grey hair barely registering on our radar, while others don't seem to have aged at all! English football player David Beckham was in his twenties when he rose to global popularity and, looking at his recent H&M underwear advert, it seems that his iconic hairstyles and tattoos are our only way of working out the old from the newer pictures of him. However, he is only 37 and has plenty of time to catch up yet. It's the over-50s that have really had our mouths agape in recent times as we've been scouring the net for the most youthful looking middle to old aged stars. 

Anthony Kiedis, Tom Cruise, Jim Carrey

(Anthony Kiedis, Tom Cruise, Jim Carrey)

Continue reading: Good Genes Or Good Ops: Which Male Celebrities Don't Show Their Age?

New Beautiful Creatures Preview Dissects Fate And Our Control Over It (Trailer)


Alice Englert Jeremy Irons Emma Thompson

The latest trailer for fantasy film Beautiful Creatures offers an insight into the narrative's tale of fate and how much of it can be controlled. The story focuses on a young witch - they use the term Caster - called Lena who feels self-conscious at all the attention she receives in the normal world for her magic powers. So what better thing to do than move to a small conservative town in the backwaters of America? They're sure to take to someone so different there. Here she meets someone she falls in love with, of course. And they're also a 'mortal' (one of us, basically) so you can be sure that won't go down too well with her fellow Casters. 

Watch the trailer for Beautiful Creatures.

 

Continue reading: New Beautiful Creatures Preview Dissects Fate And Our Control Over It (Trailer)

Beautiful Creatures Trailer


Lena Duchannes is a Caster whose family has plenty of dark power between them, but rather than feeling empowered, Lena just wishes she can be mortal so she wouldn't have to hide and people wouldn't talk about her all the time. When she moves to the small and somewhat conservative town of Gatlin, South Carolina, she finds herself an outcast but is soon noticed by her school mate Ethan Wate who is enchanted by her and the excitement her arrival brings to this ordinary, unmoving town. However, their relationship is compromised by the fact that Lena only has a matter of days left before she is subjected to the Claiming; a process that will decide whether she will turn to the Light or the Dark side of magic. While her uncle does everything in her power to make sure she is claimed to the Light, the all-powerful Sarafine is convinced that she will have great magical supremacy which would better be served in the Dark. 

'Beautiful Creatures' is the story of just how much love can conquer and, equally, the devastation it brings. It has been adapted to screen by Oscar nominated director and screenwriter Richard LaGravenese ('P.S. I Love You', 'The Mirror Has Two Faces') from the book of the same name by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl. The fantasy romance will be released in time for Valentine's Day on February 13th 2013.

Director: Richard LaGravenese

Continue: Beautiful Creatures Trailer

The Words Trailer


Rory Jansen is a young writer who is failing to achieve any kind of literary recognition and is on the edge of giving up as he and his wife Dora struggle to pay the bills. One day, as a kind gesture, Dora buys Rory an antique looking leather case in which he later discovers a collection of papers detailing a highly compelling and well written novel. In a moment of utter desperation and thoughtlessness, Rory copies the story and gets it published under his own name finally achieving the recognition and success he so craved. It's only a matter of time before he gets found out and he begins to realise how many people's lives he has affected by his one moment of stupidity. He must face the consequences for stealing the work of another writer and find a way to fix everything.

Continue: The Words Trailer

Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery at Golden Globe Awards

Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery
Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery
Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery
Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery
Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery
Forest Whitaker, Jeremy Irons, Roger Moore and Sean Connery

Eragon Review


Weak
Christopher Paolini began writing Eragon, a fantasy novel about dragons, elves, and a farmboy who finds out that his destiny is to destroy an evil empire, when he was 15 years old. Those themes may sound familiar to you, and that was perhaps an important part of the book's success: It became a bestseller.

I could have written a similar book (though perhaps not when I was fifteen) but I never guessed that the Tolkien estate and Lucasfilm would have given permission to use all of their ideas. As one of Paolini's characters says, forgiveness is easier than permission, and everyone seems to have forgiven Paolini (up to a point -- we''ll see how well the movie does). That's good, because every major plot point in Eragon is ripped off from The Lord of the Rings or the Star Wars series (with occasional ripoffs, probably subconscious, from other sources, like The Wizard of Oz). In fact, Eragon is so derivative it's surprising that it even got published. Or it would be, if publishing houses still had standards.

Continue reading: Eragon Review

Inland Empire Review


Terrible
To those who thought that Terry Gilliam's gothic frenzy Tideland was an auteur who had lost all restraint: In the words of Bachman-Turner Overdrive, you ain't seen nothing yet.

The notorious David Lynch has always held a rather slippery grip on narrative construction and a rather absent grasp on convention. At last we left him, his surreal dreamscape was the city of L.A. and a pair of lesbian lovers who may or may not have broken up because of a brash film director, and that's just the peripheral story. Mulholland Drive was Lynch at his very best, using Los Angeles as a canvas to purge all his hallucinatory digressions and woozy dreams into a noir-tinged love story. Lynch now returns to L.A. once again for Inland Empire, a 180-minute, digitally-shot nightmare that culls together the absolute worst attributes of Lynch and his personal style.

Continue reading: Inland Empire Review

Stealing Beauty Review


Bad
Stealing Beauty is a bad movie. Bernardo Bertolucci, the Academy Award-winning director of 1987's The Last Emperor, is dead. He has been replaced with a hormonal and juvenile kid, masquerading as a filmmaker, desperately trying to appeal to a cerebral audience yet maintaining enough accessibility for the moviegoing public.

Stealing Beauty fails miserably on both counts.

Continue reading: Stealing Beauty Review

The Time Machine (2002) Review


Weak
Guy Pearce remakes his second film of the year with The Time Machine... and it's barely March. Unfortunately, he had considerably better luck with The Count of Monte Cristo than with this limp retread.

Then again, the original Time Machine wasn't really anything special - a bunch of bad makeup effects and a weak plot. This time out the makeup's better but the story's a total loss.

Continue reading: The Time Machine (2002) Review

The Lion King Review


Extraordinary

One of Disney's greatest achievements, this is to my knowledge the only animated film to be turned into a Broadway musical. (Beauty and the Beast doesn't count, since that film had prior life outside the Disneyverse.)

The Lion King is primarily memorable because it's not based on a fairy tale or a children's story, and thus avoids the cliches that saddle so many Disney flicks. There's no "love conquers all" message, no moral about how trying hard will make everything come out OK. In fact, for much of its running time, The Lion King says the exact opposite: Hakuna Matata means "no worries," right? It's in the past, so let it go. But The Lion King also tells us that we can learn from the past, that tyrants should be overthrown, and that we should own up to our mistakes in the end.

This also makes The Lion King one of Disney's most adult movies. Though it's rated G, it features numerous scenes of peril and death -- with lion cub Simba orphaned after his uncle kills off his dad to usurp the throne and title of king of the jungle. But that too is part of the famed Circle of Life. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. Simba runs off to live in the jungle -- gettin' real, ya know -- stricken with guilt that he (thinks he) killed his father. Eventually he returns home to showdown with evil uncle Scar, who has been ruling the jungle with an iron fist, disrupting the Circle of Life.

The Lion King is one of Disney's last great 2-D creations, with computers aiding in some truly stellar moments such as the wildebeest stampede. Lots of perspective shots and moving cameras make this one of the genre's most film-like movies.

If there's anything annoying about the film, it's the singing, young Simba sounds like a young Michael Jackson. On the new song added to the just-out DVD release of the movie, the atrociously vapid "Morning Report," he sounds like a castrato Michael Jackson. You almost don't want him to succeed, but thankfully, Simba eventually grows up and is replaced, voice-wise, by Matthew Broderick. By way of other extras, there's a whole second disc of goodies, including an extensive selection of making-of footage, a deleted scene or two, an alternate first verse of "Hakuna Matata," a special home theater audio mix (sounds good), and about a bazillion kid-friendly features like games and singalongs.

The Lion King has rightfully spawned one of the most enduring industrial complexes ever to come from an animated cat. Way to go, Disney.

[]Join the Disney Movie Club and get three free Disney DVDs![][]

Ah, the majesty.

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


Weak

For almost five years now, Hollywood studios have beentrying to duplicate the success of "Gladiator"by making the same big-budget historical battle epic over ("TheLast Samurai") and over ("Troy")and over ("KingArthur") and over ("Alexander").

Each movie has re-imagined history from a modern, let's-keep-an-open-mindperspective and hewed to a shopworn formula in which the hero rallies hismen against great odds and for a greater good. He invariably leads theminto the same blood-and-mud war scenes, which are always shot in the samestaccato slow-motion that characterizes the chaos of combat but forgetsthe audience needs to be kept abreast of who is winning. The hero alsoalways finds time to romance a beautiful woman from another culture.

Aside from having different casts, the only significantvariations between these films seem to be 1) whether the hero was of noblebirth or came up from nothing to become a great leader, and 2) whetherthe battlefields are green and forested or brown and sandy. One thing mostof them definitely have in common is that they've bombed at the box office.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Jeremy Irons

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Jeremy Irons

Date of birth

19th September, 1948

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.87


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Jeremy Irons Movies

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