Jeremy Davies

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64th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, Held At Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals

Jeremy Davies, Leslie Mann, Judd Apatow and Emmy Awards - Jeremy Davies, Leslie Mann and Judd Apatow Sunday 23rd September 2012 64th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals

Jeremy Davies, Leslie Mann, Judd Apatow and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards

64th Primetime Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception At The Pacific Design Center

Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards Friday 21st September 2012 64th Primetime Emmy Awards Performers Nominee Reception at the Pacific Design Center

Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards
Jeremy Davies and Emmy Awards

It's Kind Of A Funny Story Review


OK
While this comedy is an intriguing exploration of mental illness, the title is perhaps too accurate: it's only kind of funny. But even though the film is somewhat mopey, it's also packed with great moments.

Craig (Gilchrist) is a 17-year-old overwhelmed by thoughts of suicide. So one night he heads to the emergency room for help, then talks the doctor into admitting him for observation. He's a bit shocked that he'll be there for at least five days, but quickly becomes friends with Bobby (Galifianakis) and Noelle (Roberts). His parents (Graham and Gaffigan) are supportive, and his doctors (Davis and Davies) help him work through his issues. But the biggest challenge is to sort out his feelings for Nia (Kravitz), the girlfriend of his best pal (Mann).

Continue reading: It's Kind Of A Funny Story Review

Rescue Dawn Review


Good
In 1997, Werner Herzog made Little Dieter Needs to Fly, a documentary about German-born American Navy pilot Dieter Dengler who, in the early days of the Vietnam War, was captured and held in a Laotian POW camp from which he staged a daring escape before being rescued by Navy search teams. What emerges through Dengler's first-hand accounts is a portrait of a lucid and courageous survivor. Rescue Dawn is a companion piece to Little Dieter (rather than the other way around); on the level of character study, Herzog manages nothing as affecting in the fictionalized feature version of Dengler's story as the real-life documentary version of it.

This isn't to say Rescue Dawn isn't good. It's often great, and in all the ways that Herzog's cinema can be great. As in Aguirre: The Wrath of God and Fitzcarraldo (his undisputed masterpieces) Herzog plunges himself (and the rest of us) once again into the jungle, in all its deceptive beauty. The jungle is that twilight zone, the border between life and death that is the domain of Herzog's cinema, and cinematographer Peter Zeitlinger (who also shot Little Dieter) ably carries the torch that his predecessor Thomas Mauch held aloft so heroically in those aforementioned Conradian tales of men endeavoring to overcome nature (and failing). Herzog lives in awe and terror of the natural world (he goes into this at length in Grizzly Man), and nowhere is that paradox more palpable than in Rescue Dawn, in which the jungle can be jaw-droppingly gorgeous one moment, and a stultifying prison the next.

Continue reading: Rescue Dawn Review

Spanking The Monkey Review


Good
Like trip-hop group Massive Attack, David O. Russell started off quiet and slowly became loud as all get-out. With all the craziness and banter that came out over Russell's philosophical slapstick masterpiece I Heart Huckabees, it's hard to believe that his foray began with this very quiet, very shocking film. Even the settings seem to have slowly become more and more convoluted: Spanking the Monkey was filmed in a quiet, almost-Podunk town in upstate New York, I Heart Huckabees is set in the sprawling, bombastic landscape of Los Angeles. However many differences I can name, there's no denying that both films are Russell's; they both exude a peculiarity and hypnotic style that piss plenty of people off.

Raymond (Jeremy Davies) is prepping himself for a very rewarding medical internship when his father, Tom (Benjamin Hendrickson), insists that he return home to take care of his sick mother (Alberta Watson) who has broken her leg. As all college students are, Ray becomes randy and hormonal with mounting professional frustration, the constant physical contact with his mother and the inclusion of Toni (Carla Gallo), a high school student that he tries to deflower. The rest of the movie is, essentially, leading up to the big climax of Ray getting frisky with his mom in an incestuous, liquor-driven free-for-all. It's easily one of the more interesting films about oedipal relations, but there are problems.

Continue reading: Spanking The Monkey Review

Secretary Review


Excellent
Secret desires and dark, unusual fetishes make for great fiction, but few filmmakers have enough courage to tackle ideas that private. However, Steven Shainberg has more than enough audacity and he doesn't hesitate to push the envelope way beyond the norm with his new movie Secretary, a film which appropriately won a Special Jury Prize for originality at Sundance.

Secretary explodes with juicy innuendo, even from its opening moments. An extending establishing shot plays against mischievously sensual music as a woman seductively strolls through a business office performing secretarial duties. She approaches a desk, staples a few papers, pours fresh coffee into a mug, and then returns to her employer. Sounds ordinary, except that she does these things while locked inside a weird S&M device.

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Going All The Way Review


OK
Jeremy Davies doesn't really make for a credible ladykiller, nor does he even pass for a G.I. straight outta WWII. Going All the Way's bevy of beauties (dig the cast list) can't make much more out of Mark Pellington's coming of age flick, but an early Ben Affleck proves that, well, Affleck will always be Affleck. Ultimately it's goofy and a little bit confusing, but a few of its insights are worthwhile, if far from unique in this genre.

Saving Private Ryan Review


Extraordinary
At this point, I don't know what I'd say about Saving Private Ryan, even if I hadn't liked it.

Undoubtedly this year's hype leader among "quality" pictures, Ryan hasn't garnered a word of bad buzz aside from the stern and dire warnings about its overwhelming violence content. It's no lie: Ryan may be one of the goriest films ever made - it will certainly be the goriest to ever win an Oscar (which will come in droves: I predict seven).

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The Million Dollar Hotel Review


Grim
Three words: Story by Bono.

Yikes! This marginal flick puts detective Mel Gibson in charge of investigating the murder of a billionnaire's son in a wacky hotel overrun by mental patients who can't afford the regular nut bin. And well, that's about all there is to tell, except that the title was once The Billion Dollar Hotel. That's a big downgrade.

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The Florentine Review


Grim
The Florentine has that desperate desire to be Reservoir Dogs, with a rogues' gallery of ex-cons, mobsters, and sad sacks all trying to make a go at life and intersecting at their favorite bar. Alas, few of their stories are worth paying much attention to, though James Belushi is (unintentionally) hysterical as a scam artist taking advantage of poor Luke Perry.

Cq Review


OK
Am I supposed to be excited that Francis Ford Coppola's son is directing his first film? Apparently everyone else is. Maybe Roman Coppola will become the genius director his father is. But if he wants to prove it, he's going to have to do a bit better than CQ.

CQ stars mostly people you've never heard of in a movie about making movies that were never actually made. Don't worry, it's really not that confusing. Boring, yes, but certainly not confusing. Jeremy Davies plays Paul, a struggling young director, who funds his personal film by working as a film editor on a cheesy, big budget science-fiction movie. But his director doesn't have an ending, and eventually Paul finds himself gifted with the job.

Continue reading: Cq Review

Teknolust Review


Terrible
A sci-fi film for those who enjoy the concept and theory of the genre, if not actually its practice, Teknolust would probably be better enjoyed if it had been made into a multimedia display for a modern art museum. But, alas, it was not, and so viewers have to endure new media artist Lynn Hershman Leeson's uncomfortable attempts at taking her cracking-stiff theories and translating them into dramatic narrative form.

Dipping back into the world of the micro-indie film - which she seemed to have mostly abandoned after the passing of her cinematic mentor, Derek Jarman - Tilda Swinton plays four roles here, but Dr. Strangelove it ain't. Her primary role is as Rosetta Stone (get it?), a bio-geneticist who, in a strangely-reasoned attempt to help the world by creating robots equipped with artificial intelligence, has discovered how to download her own DNA into a computer and thus create three SRAs (Self Replicating Automatons) in her image. The SRAs are named Ruby, Marine and Olive and dresses them each according to color (red, blue, and green). This doesn't serve much purpose besides being pretty look at, and also giving us an easy way of telling the Swintons apart (aside from the fashion-victim wigs Ruby and Olive wear). Rosetta herself is easy enough to ID: as the nerdy scientist, they put her in the most frightful and unattractive of the wigs and make her goggle out at the world from behind a pair of giant glasses.

Continue reading: Teknolust Review

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