Jennifer Tilly

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The One Step Close Foundation's 'Raising the Stakes for Cerebral Palsy' celebrity poker tournament

Jennifer Tilly - The One Step Close Foundation's 'Raising the Stakes for Cerebral Palsy' celebrity poker tournament at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas Resort & Casino at Planet Hollywood - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Friday 19th June 2015

Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly

Video - Sofia Coppola And Jaime King Among Stars At Valentino Sala Bianca 945 Launch - Part 6


Academy Award winning film director Sofia Coppola and 'Sin City' star Jaime King arrived on the red carpet at the Valentino Sala Bianca 945 launch in New York.

Continue: Video - Sofia Coppola And Jaime King Among Stars At Valentino Sala Bianca 945 Launch - Part 6

Video - Jennifer Tilly Poses Outside The 7th Annual All-In For Cerebral Palsy Celebrity Poker Tournament


7th Annual All-In For Cerebral Palsy Celebrity Poker Tournament at Bally's Las Vegas Hotel & Casino saw Jennifer Tilly gracing the red carpet. Aside from being an accomplished television and film actress, Tilly is an Academy Award-nominee and a winner of the World Series of Poker bracelet - the most prestigious award for a poker player.

Continue: Video - Jennifer Tilly Poses Outside The 7th Annual All-In For Cerebral Palsy Celebrity Poker Tournament

The 7th Annual All-In For Cerebral Palsy Celebrity Poker Tournament

Jennifer Tilly - One Step Closer Foundation 7th Annual All-In For Cerebral Palsy Celebrity Poker Tournament at Bally's Las Vegas Hotel & Casino - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 13th December 2014

Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly and Phil Laak

5th Annual Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic

Jennifer Tilly - A variety of celebs were photographed at the 5th Annual Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic at Will Rogers State Historic Park, Pacific Palisades, California, United States - Saturday 11th October 2014

Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly

Vivica A. Fox's Fabulous 50th Birthday Celebration

Jennifer Tilly, Vivica A. Fox and Brandi Glanville - Vivica A. Fox's Fabulous 50th Birthday Celebration - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 2nd August 2014

Jennifer Tilly, Vivica A. Fox and Brandi Glanville
Brandi Glanville and Jennifer Tilly
Jennifer Tilly, Vivica A. Fox and Brandi Glanville
Brandi Glanville and Jennifer Tilly
Brandi Glanville and Jennifer Tilly

The Movies Of The Wachowski's: From Best To Worst


Andy Wachowski The Matrix V For Vendetta Hugo Weaving Keanu Reeves Carrie-Anne Moss Laurence Fishburne Halle Berry Natalie Portman Jennifer Tilly Gina Gershon

Press shy and intentionally low-profile, the Wachowski brothers (now brother and sister) occupy a rare position in Hollywood of being household names, responsible for some truly awe-inspiring works of cinematic innovation that have enamoured critics and audiences alike. Yet, unlike directors of a similar calibre and position in pop culture- Tarantino and JJ Abrams for instance, they allow their films to speak for themselves, eschewing the usual directorial promotional tropes and refusing interviews.

 Wachowskis
Andy and Lana Wachowski rarely appear in public and never commit to promoting their films.

They are so ardent to withhold anonymity in favour of greater artistic candour that it is reportedly highlighted in the Wachowski’s contracts that they will remain unburdened by arduous press commitments. Despite this, the pair are amongst the biggest names in Hollywood, thanks mainly to the Matrix trilogy, which revolutionized the cinematic experience. A Wachowski Bros. picture is synonymous with outstanding cinematography, multi-dimensional plots and a visual feast that is never short of the spectacular. Positing a triple threat of sorts, the Andy and Lana have proven their ability to not only direct a picture, but also to produce and pen truly original and brilliant screenplays in their own right.

Continue reading: The Movies Of The Wachowski's: From Best To Worst

Empire Of Silver Trailer


In Shanxi, China, 1899, the Kang family is part of a banking empire that is modernly known as China's Wall Street. Lord Kang has no other option than to make his third and least favourite son, Third Master, is an heir to the family business. But Third Master is young and hedonistic and at first refuses. But after a series of events which include the kidnapping of his brother's wife, Third Master is forced to grow up and he unwillingly assumes his role.

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Bart Got A Room Review


Excellent
High school coming-of-age films have recently been overflowing movie screens like stuffed toilets. They can be hard-edged and true like Adventureland. Or raunchy yet soft and fuzzy like Superbad. Or they can be totally wacky, as is the case with Brian Hecker's Bart Got a Room.

Hecker's rite-of-passage romp, about a high school senior and resident twerp who strings out getting a prom date until the last second, takes place in an over-baked retirement community in Florida where the youngsters look like sprites among the old-folks majority. Hecker's take on the plastic, ready-to-go community is a nutty cartoonish style, taking its influence from Frank Tashlin -- a place of consumer detritus baking, along with the residents, in the bright light of the leisure world.

Continue reading: Bart Got A Room Review

Bride Of Chucky Review


Weak
Child's Play spoofs itself with this very tongue-in-cheek installment of the "Chucky" series. Standing out in more ways than one (ahem) is Jennifer Tilly as Chucky's love interest -- first as the human that brings him back from the dead, then as the doll that Chucky forces her soul into. Plenty of "witty" repartee among the cast, with none of the guilt that you're watching a serious attempt at making a horror flick.

Seed of Chucky Review


Good
Just when you thought puppets couldn't kill and screw any more than they did in Team America: World Police, along comes Seed of Chucky, the fifth film in the Child's Play series. Giving the South Park creators an inch-long wooden bird by stealing the market for weird puppet comedies, Seed of Chucky steals the show as the new king of all puppet comedies and leaves no envelope unpushed, no bad joke avoided, and no pop star alive.

The classic campfest that is Seed of Chucky begins as any movie with "Seed of" in the title should... by having one of the weirdest credit sequences featuring doll sperm flying into an egg and watching a small doll gestate, complete with umbilical cord and "Made in Japan" stamp.

Continue reading: Seed of Chucky Review

Embrace Of The Vampire Review


Grim
You have to wonder what Alyssa Milano was thinking when she opted to take the lead role in the cheapie, borderline-sexploitation flick Embrace of the Vampire. Who's the Boss? had wrapped in 1992, and a few TV movies (including a turn as Amy Fisher in '93) didn't kick-start her film career at all. Embrace took her into the realm of B-movies and hard. She's topless for about half the film, though her character is supposed to be a virgin being seduced by a vampire for unknown ends on the eve of her 18th birthday. (Mind you, Milano already had a tattoo above her crotch, kind of ruining the "innocent" effect.) It's a miracle she came out of the funk, landing a cushy role in Charmed and a spokesperson job for 1-800-COLLECT. Way to go, Alyssa.

Continue reading: Embrace Of The Vampire Review

Tideland Review


Unbearable
It's not that there's necessarily anything wrong with a film that uses the dead gas escaping from a putrefying corpse for comic effect by making it sound like flatulence. There's nothing that says a film can't find the humor or humanity in a mentally damaged, possibly homicidal man befriending a lonely pre-teen girl of dubious sanity with whom he seems to have less-than-honorable intentions. And there's nothing wrong with having squirrels or severed dolls-heads speak to that same girl in lieu of human companionship. In short, it's not the dark subject matter of Terry Gilliam's Tideland that makes it so squirmingly unwatchable, it's his callous, giggly, and monstrously tone-deaf approach.Based on the novel by Mitch Cullen, Gilliam's film is a trippy fantasia that has the feeling of a Neil Gaiman pastiche of a junkie version of Alice in Wonderland as interpreted by Asia Argento and JT LeRoy -- only worse. The rather brilliantly naturalistic Jodelle Ferland wastes her talent playing Jeliza-Rose, a young girl of uncommonly optimistic outlook whose no-good parents (Jennifer Tilly and Jeff Bridges) are squabbling junkies who barely pay attention to her unless it's to help them shoot up. Not long into the film, Tilly fatally overdoses, sending Jeliza-Rose and her dad, Noah, on the road, as Noah is convinced in his heroin haze that the authorities will be after him. They end up at his old family farmhouse, boarded up and filled with the dusty memories of his long-dead mother. Then Noah ODs, too, leaving Jeliza-Rose on her own.She doesn't seem to mind, really, as it takes her awhile to even realize Noah is dead (in the meantime, she dresses his corpse in a wig and makeup). The world through Jeliza-Rose's eyes seems a pretty wonderful place, which she fills with imaginary voices and fantastical creations. The house itself is full of undiscovered treasure and surrounded by tall, wind-blown prairie grass. Meanwhile, just down the road is another house where a crazy woman in a black beekeepers' outfit (Janet McTeer) and her younger brother (Brendan Fletcher), the previously mentioned potential psychopath who initially comes off as an innocent but seems later to take a liking to Jeliza-Rose.Tideland is obviously a story packed full of material that's best handled delicately, what with the overall fog of insanity and the intimations of pedophilia. The problem here is that "delicate" is not a word one would ever use to describe Gilliam. A filmmaker with obvious and commendable visual talents (strangely in abeyance here), his storytelling taste has always vacillated between the sarcastic and the sentimental, with Tideland being a stomach-churning slurry of the two. In a story that calls for a light hand, Gilliam uses only the hammer, smacking home each and every scene with acting best described (with the exception of Ferland) as hysterical and a sense of humor that goes beyond the merely tasteless and verges on the deranged.There's always the chance that the whole film is a great put-on, a low-budget joke of the most gigantic order -- it does literally end, after all, with a train-wreck. Anything is possible. But that may not matter in the end, because if there was ever a film to end a career, Tideland is it.The tide is high and I'm movin' on.

Second Best Review


OK
An embittered writer's movie about the coruscating damage of jealousy and the impossibility of finding nobility in failure, Second Best has a pretty good time with its characters, even with all the sad sacks on display. Written and directed by Eric Weber, it's all about Elliot Kelman (Joe Pantoliano), a former publishing executive who bombed out and returned to his small New Jersey hometown - more than a whiff of autobiography here, as Weber was once a big-city ad exec but now lives in a small town and writes screenplays - where he spends his time obsessing over his failure and that of his group of friends. As a means of getting his creative juices out (or simply rubbing his depression in everybody's face), Elliot writes a weekly missive about "The Loser," which he is too scared will be rejected and so just prints up several thousand of them and hires a high school kid to leave them around town. And so, Elliot's self-hating, barely-fictionalized musings about why he and others like him are failures, and why it's better to acknowledge that than delude themselves, flutter in the wind, taped to delicatessen windows, stuffed under windshield wipers, blowing down the street.

The big event awaited by Elliot's friends - a bum but friendly bunch that include a broke real estate agent, an ER doctor and an older guy with prostate cancer - is the arrival of their old friend, movie magnate Richard (Boyd Gaines), whose newest blockbuster just won a slew of Oscars. The jealousy that envelops all of is deadly, of course, but at least Richard lets them play at a nice golf course, so it's not all bad. Although Weber doesn't go the expected route by turning Richard into a preening Hollywood villain, that doesn't stop Elliot (who sells suits at the mall and cadges money from everybody he knows, including his nursing home-confined mother) from feeling bitterly resentful at his friend's wealth and success.

Continue reading: Second Best Review

Jennifer Tilly

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