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Jennifer Jason Leigh - 68th Annual DGA Awards 2016 held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at DGA Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - 68th Annual DGA Awards 2016 held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, DGA Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh , Quentin Tarantino - The Hateful Eight premiere at Zoo Palast - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Kurt Russel, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino

Kurt Russell, Jennifer Jason Leigh , Quentin Tarantino - The Hateful 8 Berlin Premiere in Charlottenburg. at Zoo Palast - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Kurt Russell, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Quentin Tarantino
Jennifer Jason Leigh, Quentin Tarantino, Kurt Russell and Steven Gaetjen
Kurt Russell
Kurt Russell
Kurt Russell
Jennifer Jason Leigh, Quentin Tarantino, Kurt Russell and Steven Gaetjen

Jennifer Jason Leigh - European premiere of 'The Hateful Eight 8' at Zoo Palast movie theater. at Zoo Palast movie theater - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - 27th Annual Producers Guild Awards (PGA) held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Los Angeles, California, Producers Guild Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - 27th Annual Producers Guild Awards (PGA) - Arrivals at Producers Guild Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - 21st Annual Critics Choice Awards 2016 held at the Barker Hanger Airport in Santa Monica. at Barker Hanger Airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - 21st Annual Critics' Choice Awards - Arrivals at Barker Hangar, Critics' Choice Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Sunday 17th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - The Weinstein Company & Netflix 2016 Golden Globe After Party held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel at Beverly Hilton Hotel, Golden Globe - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 11th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea at The Four Season Los Angeles - Arrivals at The Four Season Los Angeles at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea at The Four Season Los Angeles - Arrivals at The Four Season Los Angeles at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Samuel L. Jackson , Jennifer Jason Leigh - 2015 National Board Of Review Gala - Red Carpet arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 5th January 2016

Samuel L. Jackson and Jennifer Jason Leigh
Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson and Jennifer Jason Leigh
Samuel L. Jackson

Jennifer Jason Leigh - National Board of Review Gala at Cipriani 42nd.St - Arrivals at Cipriani 42nd.st. - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 5th January 2016

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

Jennifer Jason Leigh - Celebrities attend The Hateful Eight premiere at ArcLight Hollywood Cinerama Dome. at ArcLight Hollywood Cinerama Dome - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 7th December 2015

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh

The Hateful Eight Trailer


John Ruth earnt his nickname The Hangman for a good reason, he's one of the best bounty hunters of his generation and he's just caught himself a BIG prize, Daisy Domergue has a bounty of ten thousand dollars on her head and Ruth isn't going to share his reward with any other man he might meet on the road.

On their trip, the weather in Wyoming begins to turn and the bounty hunter and his trophy must leave the road and take shelter. They find themselves hauled up at Minnie's Haberdashery, a small stagecoah stopover. This trip just became all the more risky for Ruth as they're not the only dubious residents staying at the layover.

Knowning that the chatter will soon spread, each member of the boarding house are introduced to one another. There's the new sheriff Chris Mannix; Bob The Mexican who's looking after Minnie's Haberdashery whilst Minnie is busy; Oswaldo Mobray AKA The Little man; General Sanford Smithers, an aging confederate General; Joe Gage also known as The Cow-puncher and finally the mysterious Major Marquis Warren, an ex-soldier (for the Union) turned notable bounty hunter.

Continue: The Hateful Eight Trailer

Beat Generation Comes Alive, Daniel Radcliffe Is Allen Ginsberg In 'Kill Your Darlings' [Trailer + Pictures]


Daniel Radcliffe Elizabeth Olsen Michael C. Hall Dane DeHaan Jennifer Jason Leigh

In Kill Your Darlings, Daniel Radcliffe takes a radical step from his days playing the world’s favourite wizard by portraying Allen Ginsberg in his early years at Columbia University. It is there he becomes infatuated with Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan) and strikes up friendships with beat legends, William Burroughs (Ben Foster) and Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston).

Daniel Radcliffe in Kill Your DarlingsDane DeHaan [L] and Daniel Radcliffe [R] in Kill Your Darlings

The film follows Ginsberg’s dramatic time at the university, from his early relationship with Carr to the murder investigation that would then shape the lives of all the promising artists. It’s a stylish entry from director John Krokidas; full of cigarette smoking, whisky swilling and late night plotting.

Continue reading: Beat Generation Comes Alive, Daniel Radcliffe Is Allen Ginsberg In 'Kill Your Darlings' [Trailer + Pictures]

Kill Your Darlings Trailer


Allen Ginsberg is a Beat Generation writer, with no idea that his venture to New York to attend Columbia University will hold more than just a promising future career-wise. It's there that he meets Lucien Carr; a slightly unhinged but ambitious, intelligent and extremely good looking fellow student who enjoys wild partying with his wealthy friend  William Burroughs and, later, Jack Kerouac. As Allen and Lucien become closer, the latter's much older friend - a professor named David Kammerer - becomes increasingly jealous, threatening Allen who discovers that he has been following Lucien from city to city over a few years. Although Allen insists that they must find a way to prevent this incessant stalking, he is deeply shocked when David's body is discovered in the Hudson River, with Lucien held as prime suspect for stabbing him to death. Allen now faces a dilemma; to either use his skills in writing to make sure his friend is liberated, or reveal what he now believes is the truth to all.

Continue: Kill Your Darlings Trailer

Greenberg Review


OK
There's a terrific character profile buried within this meandering, awkward film. The actors create superbly rounded people, but the slow pace and seemingly aimless script make it rather maddening to watch.

While her boss Phil Greenberg (Messina) and family are on holiday, Florence (Gerwig) is taking care of their home and dog. And she also ends up taking care of his brother Roger (Stiller) when he comes to stay in the house. Roger is obsessive-compulsive and not very good at relationships. He gets in touch with his old pal (Ifans) and his newly single ex (Leigh), but is unable to avoid falling for Florence along the way. This doesn't go too well at all, mainly because Roger can't think through anything clearly.

Continue reading: Greenberg Review

Greenberg Trailer


Watch the trailer for Greenberg

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Synecdoche, New York Review


Weak
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

Continue reading: Synecdoche, New York Review

Synecdoche, New York Trailer


Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New York

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Margot At The Wedding Review


Good
Eventually it may be that Noah Baumbach could turn into this country's answer to France's Eric Rohmer, turning out a steady diet of small, circumspect dramas about the lives and neurotic times of New York-era literary bourgeoisie. That's one of the things that comes to mind as one takes in Margot at the Wedding, Baumbach's fourth time out as writer/director and one that seems to set a template for the future. It's a chill breeze of a film steeped in ugly inter-familial squabbling and the blinkered mentality of its self-absorbed characters who can generally only raise their gaze from their own navels long enough to find something lacking in the person they're addressing. The sour tone which was shot through Baumbach's previous work, The Squid and the Whale, has almost completely curdled here, though without losing any of that film's swift tartness.

As the titular Margot, Nicole Kidman does the yeoman's share of the work here, as the bitchy and borderline sociopathic older sister who's reluctantly comes up from Manhattan to her sister Pauline's wedding at the ancestral country home, where she's marrying a guy she finds barely even worthy of her contempt. "He's not ugly, he's just completely unattractive," is one of the many evil bon mots that Baumbach gives Kidman to spit out in her seemingly compulsive need to find fault in and drive to despair anyone within eyesight. She makes quite a pair with Jennifer Jason Leigh as Pauline, the two of them strangely beautiful while nestled under stringy and flyaway mouse-brown mops. Kidman's eyes are flashing and penetrating as Leigh's are dreamy, the two of them seemingly not of this planet but in entirely different ways.

Continue reading: Margot At The Wedding Review

Eyes Of A Stranger Review


Very Good
Surprisingly gruesome, this 1981 thriller is noteable primarily for the first feature film appearance of young Jennifer Jason Leigh, playing a girl so traumatized by her past that she's become hysterically deaf, mute, and blind. And wouldn't you know it her dumb sister (Lauren Tewes, "Julie McCoy" of The Love Boat fame) is a newscaster taking on the local serial killer with in-your-face broadcasts and Nancy Drew-style sleuthing. Director Ken Wiederhorn keeps things pretty terrifying for a slasher flick, with copious gore and inventive murders: The opening sequence lands one poor guy's head in an aquarium. It ain't Rear Window, but it'll get your gal to snuggle a little closer, I promise.

Mrs. Parker And The Vicious Circle Review


Very Good
Alan Rudolph's loving portrayal of Dorothy Parker (a spot-on yet frequently incomprehensible Jennifer Jason Leigh) is a film for historians and literary fans alike, with a cast featuring more art-house favorites than any other movie in recent memory (just look at the cast list!). The film drips into treacle with its treatment of the love triangle among Parker, her husband (Matthew Broderick), and Robert Benchley (Campbell Scott). It's the primary focus of the movie but also its weakest link. The film is at its heights when the ensemble is in full force as Parker plies her wit around the Algonquin Round Table and various social affairs (all during the age of Prohibition). Leigh was snubbed on an Oscar nomination here despite a strong performance in a very weak year (Jessica Lange won for the tepid Blue Sky).

Backdraft Review


Good
I got in enough trouble as a kid to learn firsthand that fire is cool.

That said, even the wicked fire shots of Backdraft -- which feature rising towers of flame, backwards-flowing fire, and blankets of flame that slowly ripple across the floor -- are barely able to distract you from the ultimately tiresome family drama that makes up the bulk of Ron Howard's firehouse epic.

Continue reading: Backdraft Review

Dolores Claiborne Review


Good
Kathy Bates and Jennifer Jason Leigh have returned in a new Steven King film, Dolores Claiborne. Another departure from typical King fare, this is a tense psychological drama and character study, akin to last year's The Shawshank Redemption (also based on his work).

Set on a depressed and perpetually wet island off the coast of Maine, Dolores Claiborne (Bates) is the focus of the film. Looming in her past is a secret: she may or may not have killed her abusive husband (played in flashbacks by David Strathairn). In the present, Dolores has apparently been driven to madness by her husband and her employer Vera, the elderly woman for whom Dolores nursemaids. At the film's opening, we are presented with what appears to be Vera's death by Dolores's weathered hands.

Continue reading: Dolores Claiborne Review

Existenz Review


Excellent
Well, Cronenberg is back, and after a couple of misfires like Crash, M. Butterfly, and well, pretty much the last ten years of his oeuvre, he's got a solid flick with eXistenZ. In fact, I'd say it's his best work since 1983's Videodrome.

The story is straight outta modern/near-future pop culture: Using a "bioport," you can jack your body and mind into an immersive game world--a world served up by a handheld bio-engineered creature called a "game pod" that is essentially a blood-pulsing Nintendo. There are no computers in the film: just the mutated organisms that are Cronenberg's trademark. And oh does he put them to good use.

Continue reading: Existenz Review

The Anniversary Party Review


Weak
I have long admired Jennifer Jason Leigh for her courage in the face of critical adversity, cheering every mumble in Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, clinging for dear life to the screwed warble-songs of Georgia. Sadly, "The Ballad of Jenny" went askew this year when she decided to continue her particular Brand X of raw performance, churning out snarly but predictably intense perfs in The King is Alive and her own co-directed The Anniversary Party.

Along for the ride, helping her pen this Party of lovey-dovey actors in a disgruntled group hug, is none other than her Cabaret co-star, Alan Cumming. Together, they're a force to be reckoned with: the crème de la crème of indulgence. Playing a bisexual writer and an aging starlet who never won an Academy Award, they are in effect exorcising their jitters toward an unsuspecting audience. Whether you're willing to go along for the ride is entirely up to you, but this critic found it to be deadly dull. Too much poisoned ice cream will give you a headache.

Continue reading: The Anniversary Party Review

Short Cuts Review


Very Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

Continue reading: Short Cuts Review

Last Exit To Brooklyn Review


Good
A little meandering, a little lost, and a lot grim, Uli Edel's cult classic tells a handful of stories against the backdrop of World War II and massive corruption in New York City. The centerpiece of the story is a hooker/conwoman (Jennifer Jason Leigh in an infamous role) who falls in love with one of her customers, an army guy who's about to ship out. Her personal struggle with detachment and her horrific past (and inevitable future) make the rest of the film -- which features rioting and a somewhat out of place vignette about one character's hidden homosexuality -- fade away.

The Big Picture Review


Extraordinary
This tragically underrated look at Hollywood isn't exactly realistic (if it was this easy to become a celebrity director, I'd quit this gig in a heartbeat), but damn if it isn't funny as hell. From the twisted mind of Christopher Guest, who undoubtedly has a few Hollywood tales of his own to tell, The Big Picture takes us through one man's (Kevin Bacon) brief ride from the top of the Hollywood heap to the bottom and back to the top again, all carried by an absurd wave of hype. Dozens of A-listers appear in roles large and small, none of whom quite approaches the hysterical level of Martin Short as Bacon's effeminate agent.

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Review


Excellent
What, you ask, is this movie of movies? This one which you've heard about? It's an eighties thing, with not much appeal for the modern troupe because its slower paced, less funny, than what you might see today. But, like a lot of eighties movies, it holds its own merit. This adaptation of the book by Cameron Crowe (don't know who he is? I'll give you a hint. He wrote and directed the famous line "Did you know the human brain weighs eight pounds?" That's right, the maker of Jerry Maguire and Singles) is a coming-of-age drama about a young girl making the choice all of us make, sex or a relationship.Sure, we tell ourselves that both can exist, and they can, but there is the line that she draws: if she wants to sleep around or if she wants to have something to hold onto. And the movie, in a nutshell, is about that. It follows her and her friends during their last year in High School in the small town of Ridgemont. Where each one of them ends up with their troubles, ranging from no girlfriend to an abortion to adultery. It sounds serious, right?That's not quite on target.The movie has its serious moments, but it has its funny moments too: from two girls practicing blow jobs on a carat at a lunch table to a guy cruising for chicks dressed in a pirate cap. The movie is sublimely funny. And interesting. It's very sad, in my mind, that those things are so rarely seen in the 90s.

Kansas City Review


Weak
Every time Robert Altman makes a movie, it becomes the thing to do for the Hollywood acting community. It happened with The Player. It happened with Short Cuts. It happened with Ready to Wear. And it happened with Kansas City.

The only problem is that The Player was the last of his films that was really all that great. While Kansas City marks a slight improvement over Ready to Wear, that ain't saying much because, after all, so does Showgirls.

Continue reading: Kansas City Review

Childstar Review


Good
In this smart but inconsistent look at the concept of celebrity, Canadian indie favorite Don McKellar pulls triple-duty -- writing, directing, and starring -- for the first time in seven years. That year, 1998, McKellar caught the eye of the international film audience with his end-of-the-world diary Last Night, and the ambitious epic The Red Violin, which he co-wrote. In comparison to those fine contributions, Childstar is lightweight stuff and sub-par McKellar.

Having conceived the idea for Childstar after a chance Oscar party conversation with Haley Joel Osment, McKellar stars as Rick, an experimental filmmaker who becomes the limo driver for Taylor Brandon Burns (great name!) a spoiled 12-year-old American superstar (Mark Rendall) shooting a new film in Canada. That movie, The First Son, is a ridiculous piece of jingoistic drivel where the President's son kicks some terrorist ass in order to save Dad, the White House and the whole damn country.

Continue reading: Childstar Review

In The Cut Review


Terrible
Congratulations to In the Cut, currently the worst film of 2003. Mandy Moore and the producers responsible for the equally atrocious How to Deal, can breathe a sigh of relief, for they used to stand atop the trash heap but no longer bear the burden. People, I sit through these films so you don't have to. Spare yourself and avoid Cut.

What, now you want to know why it's so bad? Where to begin? A heaping slop of half-thoughts, Cut exists so squeaky-clean Meg Ryan, trapped in a career spiral, can play against type with meager results. It begins with women turning up dead in a grimy lower Manhattan neighborhood. Assorted clues point Detective James Malloy (Mark Ruffalo) to the door of disheveled English professor Frannie Avery (Ryan), who happened to be in a local bar the night a fellow patron turned up dead.

Continue reading: In The Cut Review

The King Is Alive Review


OK
The premise is irresistible, combining dark humor with existential crisis. A busload of travelers gets lost in the Namibian desert, hundreds of miles from anywhere. After predicting this merry band of survivors will soon be killing each other over a sip of water, one member of the party suggests they stage an amateur performance of William Shakespeare's King Lear. At first, it's simply an enjoyable way to fiddle away the endless hours. Before long, however, this cast of laymen discover meaning and dangerous irony in the text. "You don't have to worry," assures their resident Goneril (Janet McTeer): "Nobody falls in love. And everybody dies in the end."

Kristian Levring's The King is Alive operates on a conceptual, pseudo-intellectual level, perhaps a touch too orderly to convey true madness. As the players become embroiled in King Lear, jealous Catherine (Romane Bohringer) plots against young hipster Gina (Jennifer Jason Leigh), who won the much-envied role of Cordelia. Meanwhile, disgruntled housewife Liz (McTeer) seduces the exotic black bus driver (Vusi Kunene) before the very eyes of her passive husband (Bruce Davison). As the actor playing King Lear (Brion James) quickly falls to pieces from dysentery, the scholarly director (David Bradley) watches the proceedings with detached malice, chuckling, "Is man no more than this?" And whatever became of Aussie survivalist Jack (Miles Anderson), who took off into the desert to find help?

Continue reading: The King Is Alive Review

Mrs. Parker And The Vicious Circle Review


Very Good
Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle stars Jennifer Jason Leigh as the infamous Dorothy Parker, in what I feel to be the best performance by an actress in 1994. Leigh is surrounded by some great supporting players also, and their exploits in prohibition-era New York are both interesting and entertaining. Although the story occasionally wanders into irrelevance and obscurity, it is ultimately a solid piece of work.

Palindromes Review


Terrible
For those coming back for more, Todd Solondz ladles on another hour and 40 minutes of hatred for the world and everyone in it. Devoid of compassion or mercy, Solondz presents the human race as a dead end of losers, cretins, hypocrites, blindly happy idiots, cynical brutes, pigs, liars, manipulators, and pedophiles. They all march to his drum, making their way through the manicured lawns and bland white houses of suburban New Jersey. Lest this be seen as an endorsement of his particular brand of "miserable-ism" cinema, Palindromes is a cinematic experience that makes one feel soul-sick and dead inside. It illuminates nothing about the world other than that it's a Bad Place, and the best thing we can do is sit back in our seats, watch images unfold on the screen, and collectively laugh mockingly at the dire situation these characters are in (and aren't we all).

Imagine hateful movies like Ladder 49, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle as being one kind of deceptive lie about the world. The kind that oversimplifies human beings, pretending we are more beautiful or powerful or good or wholesome than we actually are. Imagine sitcoms that paint a picture of us as having perfect jobs, clothes, houses, and bodies. Those are the kinds of films and media that independent film purportedly rebels against. And Todd Solondz takes it so far in the opposite direction that he paints pictures of the ugly and the lost, then asks us to mock them, and say that there's no hope. Palindromes is just as loathsome as the worst kind of lie Hollywood or television has duped us with, because it's duping us just as much in a different way. It smears us in cinematic dogshit, then says, "Isn't that horrible?"

Continue reading: Palindromes Review

Hey Arnold! The Movie Review


Terrible
With hit movies like Rugrats and Jimmy Neutron, the everything-for-kids television network Nickelodeon has done a reasonably good job bringing intelligent animated characters to life on the big screen. However their latest, Hey Arnold! The Movie, lacks the inventiveness that made its predecessors so entertaining.

The jagged storyline follows the efforts of Arnold and his friends Gerald and Helga as they try to prevent a giant conglomerate from tearing down their dilapidated neighborhood to make way for a sparkling new shopping mall. Prior efforts to thwart the plans of the villainous boss Scheck have failed. Then, much to Arnold's surprise, a document surfaces that proves that the neighborhood is a historical landmark. Obtaining the document is the youngsters' only hope of stopping the demolition crews.

Continue reading: Hey Arnold! The Movie Review

The Machinist Review


Very Good
Christian Bale lost 60 pounds for his role as an insomniac factory worker in The Machinist. In a profession where the transformation du jour has traditionally been weight gain, this an impressive physical stunt -- equaled only when Reese Witherspoon gets bonier after each pregnancy.

As unnecessary as it is for Bale to further sharpen our collective focus on gaunt bodies, his physical transformation is part of an arresting, convincing piece of acting. Brooding comes easily to Bale (he's a natural choice for the Batman role), and a prized quality for the kind of Hollywood hunk that he has verged on becoming for the past decade or so. But his physical performance in The Machinist goes far beyond standard film-world pouting. It's brooding with every ounce of sexiness or glamour sucked out -- only skin, bones, and haunted eyes remain.

Continue reading: The Machinist Review

A Thousand Acres Review


Bad
This adaptation (read: poor imitation) of Shakespeare's King Lear sports Michelle Pfeiffer, Jessica Lange, and Jennifer Jason Leigh as the three twisted sisters of ailing king Jason Robards -- only this time the kind is a farmer with a whopping 1000 acres. Parcelling the property becomes a headache thanks to Leigh's ungrateful bitch of a daughter, and soon enough a legal battle ensues... not to mention accusations of abuse, alcoholism, and every other hot-button sin you could name. No one is good in this movie. Everyone plays a variation on the annoying sad sack -- Pfeiffer probably being the worst of all. I don't know anything to redeem the movie except for an understated performance from Leigh -- unless you're into masochism. Avoid.

The Hudsucker Proxy Review


Excellent

Uber-quirky but strangely satisfying Coen escapade, skewering the world of big business (at least as it existed in the 1950s), as a company schemes to drive the price of the stock down by installing an imbecile (Tim Robbins) as president. This isn't Fargo, not by a longshot, but it's not meant to be. This is one of those fun little flicks that really, really grows on you, featuring amazing performances by Robbins, Paul Newman, and Charles Durning, and even a memorable (if rote) appearance by Jennifer Jason Leigh. But what really sticks with you is the ultra-clever dialogue... "You know, for kids!"

Miami Blues Review


Very Good
Bizarre black comedy teams Alec Baldwin with Jennifer Jason Leigh in hot Miami. He's a crook that's new to town, she's a hooker with a heart of gold and a brain of coal. Against his promise, Baldwin continues his evil ways, stealing the badge of cop Fred Ward and using it to enhance his crime spree even further. Bloody, sarcastic, and oddly compelling.

The Jacket Review


Extraordinary
"To know virtue," the Marquis de Sade once said, "we must first acquaint ourselves with vice." While the controversial writer was not referring to The Jacket when he said that many years ago, it fits well with my assessment of the film, nonetheless. The Jacket's hostility will make stomachs churn and faces cringe, but a noble cause justifies the means in the end; because of the film's hostility, when tenderness ultimately appears, it's all the more poignant. But will thin-skinned viewers be able to endure the disturbing imagery until the affectionate, optimistic persona reveals itself?

Macabre, intense, and daring, The Jacket is like a surrealistic nightmare interlaced with an unambiguous daydream fantasy; it totters between asylum and insanity, pain and pleasure, and heaven and hell. Part romantic drama, time travel odyssey, murder mystery, and gothic thriller, the film never decides on a definite genre, and is similar in some ways to experimental films like Donnie Darko and Blue Velvet. Due to its unique design, the less viewers know about the plot before they see it, the more absorbing and revealing the film will be. Thus, a very vague synopsis follows:

Continue reading: The Jacket Review

Jennifer Jason Leigh

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Jennifer Jason Leigh

Date of birth

5th February, 1962

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.60


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Jennifer Jason Leigh Movies

The Laws Of Nature Don't Apply In 'Annihilation'  Trailer

The Laws Of Nature Don't Apply In 'Annihilation' Trailer

When a biologist’s husband disappears his wife must undertake a dangerous mission into the unknown...

Good Time Movie Review

Good Time Movie Review

Robert Pattinson continues to distance himself from his teen heartthrob image with this scruffy B-movie....

Good Time Trailer

Good Time Trailer

He doesn't know exactly what happened, but when Constantine 'Connie' Nikas hears that his brother...

Morgan Trailer

Morgan Trailer

Lee Weathers evaluates potential risks in businesses, businesses that blur the lines of what could...

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Anomalisa Movie Review

Anomalisa Movie Review

As he did in films like Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless...

The Hateful Eight Movie Review

The Hateful Eight Movie Review

Quentin Tarantino is a filmmaker who simply can't be ignored, especially when he lobs a...

The Hateful Eight Trailer

The Hateful Eight Trailer

John Ruth earnt his nickname The Hangman for a good reason, he's one of the...

Anomalisa Trailer

Anomalisa Trailer

Anomalisa is a new film from directors Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson. Kaufman (Eternal Sunshine...

The Hateful Eight Trailer

The Hateful Eight Trailer

John Ruth, known by his associates and like-minded peers as The Hangman on account of...

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Welcome To Me Trailer

Welcome To Me Trailer

Oprah obsessed Alice Klieg suffers from Borderline Personality Disorder which causes her to be socially...

Kill Your Darlings Movie Review

Kill Your Darlings Movie Review

Even though it's slightly too mannered, this true drama takes a clever approach to the...

Kill Your Darlings - International Trailer And Clips Trailer

Kill Your Darlings - International Trailer And Clips Trailer

Kill Your Darlings is the previously untold story of friendship, jealousy, genius and murder that...

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