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Jennifer Connelly and her son - 2015 International Women's Day March at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, NY - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 8th March 2015

Jennifer Connelly and Her Son
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - UN Women For Peace Association International Women's Day Celebration - Red Carpet Arrivals at U.N. BUILDING - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 6th March 2015

Jennifer Connelly
Ron Howard, Jennifer Connolly, Robert Kraft and Muna Rihani Al-nasser
Jennifer Connolly and Paul Bettany
Jennifer Connolly and Paul Bettany
Jennifer Connolly and Paul Bettany
Jennifer Connolly and Paul Bettany

Jennifer Connelly - A variety of fashionable stars were photographed as they attended Louis Vuitton "Series 2" The Exhibition which was held in Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 5th February 2015

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - 'No Llores Vuela' premiere at Callao Cinema in Madrid - Arrivals - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - 'Aloft' photocall at The Ritz hotel in Madrid - Madrid, Spain - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Shelter' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Saturday 13th September 2014

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - Noah - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 31st March 2013

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - 'Noah' U.K. Premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Friday 28th March 2014

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly - 'Noah' UK Premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Monday 31st March 2014

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly and Russell Crowe - Noah premiere at Ziegfeld theater - NY, New York, United States - Thursday 27th March 2014

Jennifer Connelly and Russell Crowe
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly and Russell Crowe

Jennifer Connelly - German Premiere of 'Noah' at Zoo Palast movie theater. - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 13th March 2014

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany - Jennifer Connelly arriving with daughter Agnes Lark Bettany at Tegel Airport - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Agnes Lark Bettany

'Noah' Gets New Trail, But Is The Boat The Wrong Shape!?


Russell Crowe Emma Watson Ray Winstone Jennifer Connelly

If you’ve got a film out after the Superbowl, then you generally try and get a trailer out for a match day broadcast. Not independent, black & white films made on a small budget, but high profile blockbusters, like Noah starring Russell Crowe.

noahNoah (Crowe) looks out upon doom and dispair, but he's got a stick.

It’s only 30-seconds long, but the spot features Russell Crowe as Noah, boarding his biblical vessel and facing the almighty wrath of God in flood-form. We should all be thankful he did that, because if he didn’t, we wouldn’t be able to look at cat gifs while we’re supposed to be writing stories and answering emails.

Continue reading: 'Noah' Gets New Trail, But Is The Boat The Wrong Shape!?

Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah' Brings The Bible Tale To Epic Life With Russell Crowe [Trailer]


Russell Crowe Jennifer Connelly Anthony Hopkins Emma Watson Darren Aronofsky

Everyone knows the story of Noah, whether religious or not, virtually everyone is familiar with the man who received a warning from God that a flood was coming and built a giant ark to save two of every species and his family. Director Darren Aronofsky's biblical epic has been rumoured for some time but now we have visual proof that Noah will be released next year.

Russell Crowe
Russell Crowe Gets A (Bigger) Beard For His New Role.

The trailer gives a flavour of the digital artistry and astounding visual effects we should prepare ourselves for ahead of the movie's March 2014 release.

Continue reading: Darren Aronofsky's 'Noah' Brings The Bible Tale To Epic Life With Russell Crowe [Trailer]

Stuck In Love Review


OK

Far too tidy to be believable, this multi-strand romance holds our attention with a warmly comical tone and a watchable cast. But it's only entertaining as a bit of escapism, because the various relational entanglements are far too contrived for us to identify with them. A looser, messier approach would have made it a lot more involving.

The action takes place over the course of a year. Bill (Kinnear) is a noted novelist who stopped writing when his marriage to Erica (Connelly) ended. Even though she's now married to a fitness instructor (Joiner), Bill is waiting for her to come back to him. Although he's engaging in a mindless fling with a married neighbour (Bell) in the mean time. Bill and Erica's daughter Samantha (Collins) has just published her first novel, but has sworn off romance. Then she meets the persistent nice-guy Lou (Lerman). Meanwhile, her teen brother Rusty (Wolff) is finally working up the nerve to speak to his crush Kate (Liberato), who has both a cocaine problem and a bully (Schwarzenegger) of a boyfriend.

Writer-director Boone lets each character introduce themselves with the first line from the book of their life, and the litrary theme continues in almost every scene as they continually discuss their writings and their favourite books. Very quickly, this begins to get on our nerves, as if Boone is reminding us that nothing we're watching is actually happening: it's carefully orchestrated fiction that draws on real-life emotions to tell a series of implausible love stories. Aside from Kinnear and Connelly, who are strong enough actors to convince us of almost anything, none of the interaction feels remotely realistic. 

Continue reading: Stuck In Love Review

Stuck In Love Trailer


William Borgens was once a highly regarded novelist, however after a heart-breaking divorce with his wife Erica who left him for a younger, more handsome man, he hasn't been able to write a single word. He just spends his days thinking about the time they had together and spying on them through their windows. His pretty friend-with-benefits, Tricia, who is also divorced, does her best with her sometimes overly honest opinions to force him to get back to dating. Meanwhile, his promiscuous and cynical daughter Samantha is having her first book published while struggling to come to terms with the idea of love and still refusing to speak to her mother after she left her father, and his son Rusty, who is also an aspiring writer, tries to show one troubled and vulnerable girl that he is the guy for her.

Continue: Stuck In Love Trailer

Jennifer Connelly - Winters tale movie set New York City NY USA Tuesday 15th January 2013

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly and Ripley Sobo
Jennifer Connelly and Ripley Sobo
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly and Paul Bettany - Jennifer Connelly and Paul Bettany Sunday 9th September 2012 Celebrities at the 2012 U.S. Open to watch the Women's Final

Jennifer Connelly and Paul Bettany
Jennifer Connelly and Paul Bettany

Jennifer Connelly and Cannes Film Festival Friday 18th May 2012 'Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted' premiere- during the 65th Cannes Film Festival

Jennifer Connelly and Cannes Film Festival
Jennifer Connelly and Cannes Film Festival

Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly - Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly Monday 12th March 2012 out and about with their children in Liverpool. Paul has been joined by his family whilst filming a new feature film called 'Bloods'

Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly
Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly
Paul Bettany

Jennifer Connelly Tuesday 20th September 2011 Every Woman Every Child MDG Reception at the Grand Hyatt Hotel New York City, USA

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

The Dilemma Review


Weak
A lack of focus leaves this film neither funny enough to be a comedy nor astute enough to be a drama. Although it's clearly trying to be both, there's nothing about the story or characters that grabs our attention.

Best buddies Ronny and Nick (Vaughn and James) are trying to get their business off the ground, creating muscle-car effects for electric vehicles. One day Ronny spots Nick's wife Geneva (Ryder) kissing another man (Tatum). He's afraid to tell Nick because they're bidding for their first big contract. And he can't tell his own girlfriend Beth (Connelly), because he's planning to propose. So he confronts Geneva, who tells Ronny that her marriage is complicated. So what should Ronny do next?

Continue reading: The Dilemma Review

Jennifer Connolly Wednesday 19th January 2011 leaving her London hotel London, England

Jennifer Connolly
Jennifer Connolly
Jennifer Connolly
Jennifer Connolly

Jennifer Connelly Thursday 6th January 2011 World premiere of 'The Dilemma' held at the AMC River East Theater - Arrivals Chicago, USA

Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan - Wednesday 5th January 2011 at The Late Show With David Letterman New York City, USA

Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan
Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan
Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan
Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan
Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan
Jennifer Connelly and Ed Sullivan

The Dilemma Trailer


Ronny and Nick are best buddies and business partners, their partners are good friends and they all spend a lot of their lives together in one way or another. When Ronny catches Nick's wife passionately kissing a younger and very attractive guy, he can't believe his eyes.

Continue: The Dilemma Trailer

Creation Trailer


Watch the trailer for Creation

Continue: Creation Trailer

Creation Review


Excellent
In tackling the story of what's been called "the biggest single idea in the history of thought", the filmmakers offer a fresh angle on a controversial topic. And it's an imaginative, human approach that brings it vividly to life.

In the mid-1800s, Charles Darwin (Bettany) faces a huge crisis: struggling after the death of 10-year-old daughter Annie (West), he's at odds with his wife Emma (Connelly) and his own Christian beliefs due to the results of his study of variations in species over time. Paralysed by what this will do to his marriage and his faith, he locks his research into a box. But swirling memories of Annie, encouragement from his friends (Cumberbatch and Jones), physical illness and marital strain force him to confront something he can no longer deny.

Continue reading: Creation Review

He's Just Not That Into You Review


Bad
Women are pathetic -- at least, that's the message being preached by a recent rash of horribly misguided motion pictures. In Sex and the City, they're depicted as materialistic sluts who use their fading feminine wiles to weasel all manner of money-based goodies out of their gullible meat puppets. In Mamma Mia!, we experience fading beauty bedeviled by off-key singing and gloppy green-screen romanticism. But both of those films are feminist manifestos when compared to the gender equity awfulness of He's Just Not That Into You. Any film "loosely" based on a baffling self-help tome is already asking for trouble, but once gyno-nation gets a whiff of this effort's "ladies are losers" lament, the fashionable gloves are bound to come off.

Our story centers around Gigi (Ginnifer Goodwin), a copywriter for a spices catalog. Unlucky in love, she seeks advice from her equally ineffectual coworkers Janine (Jennifer Connelly) and Beth (Jennifer Aniston). The former is in a sexless marriage with her music industry rep hubby Ben (Bradley Cooper) who happens to be bedding a wannabe singer named Anna (Scarlett Johansson). The latter can't get her live-in partner of seven years, Neil (Ben Affleck), to commit to some form of nuptials. While Janine and Beth pursue their own guidance from gal pal ad editor Mary (Drew Barrymore), Gigi develops a platonic bond with wise guy bar manager Alex (Justin Long). He's a fount of information on how guys treat girls, and with his help, our heroine hopes to find Mr. Right... or at the very least, avoid Mr. Right Now.

Continue reading: He's Just Not That Into You Review

The Day The Earth Stood Still (2008) Review


Very Good
Remakes are the bane of many a film fan's existence. Some are strident in their wholesale hatred, while others take a "wait and see" stance before eventually dismissing the attempted upgrade. Of course, by doing so, they have ignored quite a few quality films (Cronenberg's The Fly, Jackson's King Kong, Scorsese's The Departed). Yet in general, when a modern filmmaker takes on a considered classic, they run the risk of embarrassing themselves and the material being remade. A true masterwork from the '50s, Robert Wise's The Day the Earth Stood Still is considered "verboten" by purists. An update stands as a disaster waiting to happen, right? Actually, no.

When a huge spherical object lands in New York's Central Park, a first response team led by members of the military and scientific community set out to explore its purpose. Dr. Helen Benson (Jennifer Connelly) makes contact with a strange being exiting the orb, but said creature is accidentally shot by a soldier, mandating immediate medical care. Eventually, the humanoid-looking alien named Klaatu (Keanu Reeves) explains his purpose. Mankind's lack of environmental concern and overall violent nature has led other civilized planets to mandate the destruction of the entire population. While the Secretary of Defense (Kathy Bates) plans an armed solution, Helen helps Klaatu escape, and along with her stepson Jacob (Jaden Smith), she tries to convince the extraterrestrial emissary that humanity is worth saving.

Continue reading: The Day The Earth Stood Still (2008) Review

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

Reservation Road Review


Weak
Director Terry George moves swiftly from an African tragedy to an American tragedy with his docile Reservation Road. Adapted from John Burnham Schwartz's novel by George and Schwartz, a hit-and-run accident on the titular length of blacktop becomes a catalyst for a study of grief and anxiety in two American families.

Road opens as Ethan Lerner (Joaquin Phoenix) and his wife Grace (Jennifer Connelly) watch their son Josh play cello in the school orchestra on a breezy fall evening. At the same time, Dwight Arno (Mark Ruffalo) and his son Lucas are enjoying a hot dog and a Red Sox game in overtime at Fenway Park. But his team's successful step towards reversing the curse doesn't alleviate Dwight's worry about getting Lucas back to his mother (Mira Sorvino) on time. While speeding home, Dwight accidentally swerves and hits Josh as the boy is letting some fireflies go outside of a gas station. And Dwight runs.

Continue reading: Reservation Road Review

Blood Diamond Trailer


Starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Jennifer Connelly, Blood Diamond€™ is an epic drama of greed, despair and redemption set against the carnage of the civil war in Sierra Leone in the 1990s. Combining enthralling adventure with a powerful political message, it's set to attract a wide range of audiences. 

Continue: Blood Diamond Trailer

Labyrinth Review


Very Good
I bought this film on DVD because I remembered how much my kid brother and sister used to watch it, over and over and over again, thinking my young daughter might feel the same way. No such luck. She was scared silly by the puppet goblins and worried sick about the baby Toby, which Jennifer Connelly is tasked with recovering by solving the Goblin King's (David Bowie) labyrinth. The musical numbers are as memorable as Bowie's costume and hairdo, and as Jim Henson's last real film as director (he died of pneumonia in 1990), it's a fair capstone to his career. Age has given the film an even stronger air of camp, but that's just made it more of a classic. Say, you remind me of a babe...

Blood Diamond Review


Excellent
Blood Diamond has too many politics to be an action movie, too little hanky panky to be a romantic drama, and too many chase scenes to be real social activism. It's action drama against the backdrop of political turmoil -- in this case, Sierra Leone in 1999 -- where it is tricky to come off as neither tritely do-gooder nor exploitative. In this case, the effort is surprisingly successful.

Djimon Hounsou plays Solomon Vendy, a fisherman who just wants a better life for his son. But when the rebels come, he is unwillingly thrust into the midst of the violence -- his family is scattered, he is captured, their village is decimated. He is working the diamond mines at gunpoint when he catches, and hides, an epic stone -- huge, flawless, and slightly pink.

Continue reading: Blood Diamond Review

Little Children Review


Very Good
Five years after rethinking and remapping the idea of the dramatic thriller in the now-classic In the Bedroom, Todd Field finally swings back into the director's chair with an adaptation of Tom Perrotta's Little Children after a sadly unsuccessful attempt to film an adaptation of Richard Yates' Revolutionary Road. Any filmmaker would reconsider their style after five years, and Field is no different: Little Children has little or nothing to do with In the Bedroom in mood, tone or story.

In a small Northeastern community, Brad Adamson (Patrick Wilson) secretly has a huge cult following. A gaggle of housewives, including obvious peculiarity Sarah (the consistently outstanding Kate Winslet), adore Brad from afar as he takes his son to the playground (he's a stay-at-home dad) each day, whispering his nickname between them: "The Prom King." After a dare that leads to a small kiss, Sarah and Brad start spending time together at the town pool with their kids. Rumors fly and the neighborhood becomes a cauldron of suspicion as the town learns that a reformed pedophile named Ronnie (Jackie Earle Haley) has just moved back to the neighborhood.

Continue reading: Little Children Review

The Hulk Review


Very Good
Months before The Hulk director Ang Lee announced he'd rely solely on CGI to create his colossal star, fanboys from Portland to Poughkeepsie worried about how the not-so-jolly green giant would look on screen. Early trailers fuelled speculation that Hulk would resemble Shrek, which made dedicated Hulk-a-maniacs very angry. And as we know, you wouldn't like them when they're angry.

In the words of the immortal Public Enemy, don't believe the hype. Nothing you've seen does Lee's finished product justice. For the most part, the Hulk looks fantastic. He has texture, and he certainly has mass. There's the occasional slippage to video game-quality graphics, but the aftermath of Hulk's actions, the devastation left in his wake, convince us of his existence. Until you've seen the Hulk smash a tank and wrestle a helicopter in mid-air, you ain't seen nothing.

Continue reading: The Hulk Review

Requiem For A Dream Review


Bad
[As a preface to Jeremiah's review of what will certainly become the most talked-about and overrated film of the year, I'd like to reiterate the extremely graphic and nauseating imagery -- to the point where many audience members find themselves physically sick -- that Requiem for a Dream relies on to tell its story. Jeremiah is absolutely right in his analysis that ultimately, the film has absolutely no message to give. It's all right there in the title: this is simply a 102-minute eulogy, mourning the death of a dream -- or rather four dreams -- of people trying to make something out of themselves and failing miserably at it. Aronofsky has style, but he's left it to the viewer to fill in the substance. That may be the kind of movie you want to see (unlike, say, Trainspotting), but you'll have to figure that out on your own. You'll also need to decide if nausea is an appropriate response to take away from any film. This critic gives Aronofsky points for sheer guts, but there's no excuse for avoiding a story. -Ed.]

Imagine Trainspotting without any trace of humor and you're on the right track. Picture Pasolini's Salo: 120 Days of Sodom shot by some MTV music video kid interested in the novelty of his new camera. Darren Aronofsky (Pi) stacks one degrading sight atop another without implicating the viewer, nor providing any framework or reference for his visual rape of his audience - all smoke and mirrors disguising a great, vapid emptiness.

Continue reading: Requiem For A Dream Review

Dark Water (2005) Review


Very Good
As perhaps a concession to the modern age, the haunted-house story Dark Water is set not in some gloomy old mansion but in the claustrophobic confines of a dank apartment building, and it's all the better for it. But in many other ways the film is a fairly classic scary story, albeit one that heightens a mood of mournfulness over incessant spine-straightening scares. Fresh off the wide acclaim for his young Che Guevara travelogue The Motorcycle Diaries, director Walter Salles seems an odd choice for this, his first Hollywood project. But it's a similar transition to that taken by another South American, Alejandro Amenábar, who he came to Hollywood and made The Others, another solidly classical spooker gussied up with sharp talent and moody atmospherics.

And Dark Water (a remake of Hideo Nakata's 2002 film Honogurai mizu no soko kara) is nothing if not moody. It begins in the gloom of a divorce, with just-separated Dahlia (Jennifer Connelly) and Kyle (Dougray Scott) fighting over who is going to live where - shared custody of their young girl Ceci (Ariel Gade) making commuting a big issue. Righteously furious Dahlia needs a cheap place near a good school and so ends up looking at a place on Roosevelt Island, the apartment-block-choked strip of land in the East River that makes most Manhattanites shudder and think, "There but for the grace of my broker, go I..." She and Ceci tour a grim apartment there with a chatty manager (a spot-on John C. Reilly) who tries to talk up the depressing view of rain-shrouded towers and smokestacks and the building's neo-Fascist architecture; only Reilly could say "Brutalist" with such perfectly smarmy cheer.

Continue reading: Dark Water (2005) Review

Phenomena Review


Good
The Phenomena here must be how Jennifer Connelly's utter lack of acting ability on display in this film eventually translated to an Academy Award later in her career. Lessons? Dunno. Anyway, Dario Argento's movie is rather typical of his oeuvre and one of his better attempts. In this installment, a sleepwalking (literally) Connelly uses her odd ability to communicate with insects (yes, she can even hear them over the synth-ballad soundtrack!) to help an investigation into a serial killer who's plying his trade near her Swiss boarding school. Silly and hammy, it's redeemed by some interesting moments and a good amount of suspense, despite the fact that there's a giant monkey pushing Donald Pleasence in a wheelchair. And I'm not kidding.

Continue reading: Phenomena Review

Mulholland Falls Review


OK
Just so you know, there are no waterfalls in Los Angeles. The titular Mulholland Falls refers to the smarmy practice of taking a criminal to the high point of the mountainous Mulholland Drive and booting him off, only to catch up with him sometime later at the bottom.

Mulholland Falls is the preferred method of ridding 1950s L.A. of unwanted baddies, and it is most often used by a foursome of elite cops: Nick Nolte, Chazz Palminteri, Chris Penn, and Michael Madsen. Their newest mission: to find the murderer of Allison (Jennifer Connelly), a girl whose bizarre death leads the gang to a General (John Malkovich) at the Atomic Energy Commission and his number one thug (Treat Williams).

Continue reading: Mulholland Falls Review

Of Love And Shadows Review


Terrible
Nice accent, Jennifer! This Chilean-set romantic thriller (based on an Isabel Allende book) is typical of her movie-zations: overwrought, badly acted, and borderline unwatchable. It seems only to be watched by Connelly's overzealous fans -- probably because she's seen here nearly naked. Avoid.

Waking The Dead Review


Essential
Keith Gordon is one of the best filmmakers we have working today, and he's been quietly building a strong body of work which merits attention. His cult classic anti-war film, A Midnight Clear and his tour de force adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night were two of the 15 or 20 best American films to come out in the 1990s. Gordon is particularly good at visualizing internal landscapes, particularly slow collapses into paralyzing madness and terrible guilt.

It's difficult to say whether or not Waking the Dead is his best film, since it's one of those movies which seeps into you as you view it, then stays with you in the days that follow. It's certainly his most challenging in terms of tone, structure, and theme, deliberately convoluted and fragmented, moving back and forth between two different, contrasting eras (the idealistic '70s and the aggressively opportunistic '80s) and the evolution of its deeply troubled central character, Fielding Pierce (Billy Crudup).

Continue reading: Waking The Dead Review

Higher Learning Review


Weak
I first saw John Singleton's Higher Learning when I was 17. Back in 1995, my friend and I left the theater feeling like we had seen an important commentary on American society. We felt informed.

It just goes to show you how clueless teenagers are. At 23, I rented the movie again and realized that I had no idea what the hell Singleton was talking about. Certainly, a lot of big issues are broached in the movie: racism, sexuality, democracy, college education and its value. Higher Learning poses a lot of issues, but rarely does it offer any meaningful answers.

Continue reading: Higher Learning Review

The Rocketeer Review


OK
The poor man's Indiana Jones, complete with Nazi subterfuge and heroine in distress. This paean to the cliffhangers of yore never really finds its footing, unfortunately. It's a rather tired story about a lost jet pack and the daredevil (Bill Campbell -- who hasn't had a starring role since) who finds it, and so on and so forth. Very straightforward, the mystery doesn't go very far and the love story (with Jennifer Connelly) is totally stillborn. The clever use of historical figures like Howard Hughes and W.C. Fields is really the film's only highlight.

House Of Sand And Fog Review


Good
Real estate brokers would call Vadim Perelman's solemn House of Sand and Fog a fixer-upper. At first glance, the handsome House is an easy sell. It's gorgeously shot and well acted. Skilled composer James Horner even chimes in with an aptly somber score of deliberate piano key strokes and nothing more. A closer look reveals cracks in the foundation, though, meaning House wouldn't pass a thorough homeowner's inspection, as it isn't really built to cinematic code.

Based on the best-selling novel by Andre Dubus III, House constructs a legal and ethical battle between two individuals at conflicting crossroads. How much you buy into it will depend on which of the film's two antagonists you side with. Are you a compassionate bleeding heart willing to forgive even the most irresponsible and bottomed-out loser? Or are you a strict rule-abider who swears by the letter of the law and is hesitant to play the sympathy card?

Continue reading: House Of Sand And Fog Review

Requiem For A Dream Review


Very Good

Forget every movie you've ever seen about the downward spiral of drug addiction. "Drugstore Cowboy," "Sid and Nancy," "Trainspotting," "Permanent Midnight," and more recently "Jesus' Son" -- these films are almost as innocuous as "Alice in Wonderland" compared to "Requiem for a Dream."

Director Darren Aronofsky's follow-up to the uniquely mind-bending mathematical-theological thriller "Pi," this adaptation of a 1978 novel by Hubert Selby Jr. is a soul-rattling, cerebral and cinematically ingenious runaway train of gruesome overindulgence.

Set against the forlorn backdrop of a deteriorating Coney Island, "Requiem" stars a rail-thin Jared Leto ("Fight Club," "Girl, Interrupted") as Harry, a minor-league heroin dealer who has already copped a bad habit for his own product. As the movie opens he's broken into his mother's apartment to steal her TV -- which is chained to the wall because it's not the first time this has happened -- so he can pawn it to pay for a hit.

Continue reading: Requiem For A Dream Review

House Of Sand & Fog Review


OK

A parable of American self-absorption, of people never seeing outside their own little bubble until it's too late, "House of Sand and Fog" is a psychological drama in which fear and tension are made tangible from multiple points of view.

It's a film with two strong lead performances from the stirring Jennifer Connelly, as a demoralized recovering addict who loses her family home in foreclosure, and the potent Ben Kinsley as the proud Iranian immigrant who becomes the target of this woman's distain when he buys the house at auction with plans to sell it for a profit so he can support his wife and college-bound son.

It's a film about choices and consequences, and a film absent of easy black-or-white ethics, which makes for some powerful emotions. But it's also a film with many nagging problems that add up to a distracting crescendo.

Continue reading: House Of Sand & Fog Review

The Hulk Review


OK

The bad news is, the big green guy is no Gollum.

In computer-animating the not-quite-life-like title character of "The Hulk" from scratch -- instead of motion-capturing an actor who embodied the part as "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers" did in creating its memorably alive CGI co-star -- F/X house Industrial Light and Magic isn't able to shake that herky-jerky signature look of a creature born of zeros and ones.

The monster inside emotionally repressed scientist Bruce Banner (Eric Bana, "Black Hawk Down") that is unleashed by Gamma radiation has emerald eyes that lack depth and a mechanical way of blinking. When he runs, he looks like Fred Flintstone twinkle-toeing his lane approach at the blowing alley. When he's not in a rage, his body language is just a touch too mathematically smooth to seem real. And as actor Bana is morphed into the CGI Hulk, you can see the digital seams.

Continue reading: The Hulk Review

Waking The Dead Review


Good

An eerie, enigmatic, intellectual romantic tragedy about a rising politician haunted by memories of his murdered love, "Waking the Dead" touches a raw nerve with its remarkably visceral emotional intensity.

Absolutely gripping from its very first frame, the film begins in 1974 with a young Fielding Pierce (Billy Crudup) being torn apart from the inside out as he watches news coverage of a car-bombing that killed his peace activist girlfriend (Jennifer Connelly).

Although the movie has yet to reveal anything discernible about these two people, simply watching Crudup shake uncontrollably in an eruption of tears is enough to take hold of your empathy and ride it like a rodeo mustang through the heartbreak and borderline dementia that bedevil him throughout the story's decade span.

Continue reading: Waking The Dead Review

A Beautiful Mind Review


Good

It might be hard to imagine a mathematician as an exciting movie hero -- even a brilliant, mentally unstable mathematician. What's a director going to do with that? A dramatic zoom on the guy's calculator?

Yet Ron Howard's "A Beautiful Mind" is the fifth film in as many years focused on an off-kilter arithmetic genius -- and each one of them has been mesmerizing in its own way.

Fictionalized without seeming contrived, this biography of Princeton professor and Nobel Prize winner John Forbes Nash, Jr. is the story of a determined man overcoming madness on his own terms. It is a "let's make an Oscar movie" movie. It doesn't have "Good Will Hunting's" street-smart charm or "Pi's" jarring, visceral depiction of delusion. It's not intricately intellectual like "Conceiving Ada" (about Ada Byron King, great-grandmother of the modern computer) or deeply moving like "Infinity" (about Los Alamos bomb-designer Richard Feynman and his tuberculosis-afflicted wife).

Continue reading: A Beautiful Mind Review

Jennifer Connelly

Jennifer Connelly Quick Links

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Jennifer Connelly

Date of birth

12th December, 1970

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.69


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Jennifer Connelly Movies

Only the Brave Movie Review

Only the Brave Movie Review

Based on a genuinely moving true story, this film undercuts the realism by pushing its...

American Pastoral Trailer

American Pastoral Trailer

American Pastoral is based on Philip Roth's 1998 Pulitzer Prize winning novel which follows the...

Shelter Movie Review

Shelter Movie Review

Paul Bettany makes a strong impression with his first film as a writer-director, exploring the...

Noah Movie Review

Noah Movie Review

Darren Aronofsky continues to ambitiously experiment with genres in this Old Testament blockbuster, but this...

Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

The cast and crew of ‘Noah’; director Darren Aronofsky, actors Russell Crowe and Emma Watson,...

Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

Noah is a normal family man faced with major responsibility when his dark visions lead...

Winter's Tale Movie Review

Winter's Tale Movie Review

The fact that this magical romance has been retitled A New York Winter's Tale in...

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Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

When Noah is faced with a dark message from God thanks to his gift of...

Winter's Tale Trailer

Winter's Tale Trailer

Peter Lake is a wanted burglar in a desperate struggle to escape an old gangster...

Stuck in Love Movie Review

Stuck in Love Movie Review

Far too tidy to be believable, this multi-strand romance holds our attention with a warmly...

Stuck In Love Trailer

Stuck In Love Trailer

William Borgens was once a highly regarded novelist, however after a heart-breaking divorce with his...

The Dilemma Movie Review

The Dilemma Movie Review

A lack of focus leaves this film neither funny enough to be a comedy nor...

The Dilemma Trailer

The Dilemma Trailer

Ronny and Nick are best buddies and business partners, their partners are good friends and...

9 Movie Review

9 Movie Review

Inventively animated with a striking attention to detail, this offbeat thriller might have trouble finding...

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